Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


73 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 20864
Author(s): Roselli, Emanuela
Contributor(s):
Title : Anna Comnena e la tragedia greca [Anna Komnena quoted Greek tragedy, sometimes through intermediate sources. At other times, she quoted directly from Euripides. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medioevo Greco: Rivista di Storia e Filologia Bizantina , 8., ( 2008):  Pages 275 - 281.
Year of Publication: 2008.

2. Record Number: 27116
Author(s): Giovini, Marco
Contributor(s):
Title : "A nugace in castum": L’Itinerario salvifico di "Callimaco," "Adulescens" innamorato de Rosvita [The "Callimachus" of Hrotsvitha is based on the plays of Terence with poetic influences from Prudentius. The play focuses on the desires of Callimachus for a married Christian woman. He even desires her dead body. The play ends with the conversion of Callimachus to a Christian life. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Mediaevalia , 28., 2 ( 2007):  Pages 137 - 164.
Year of Publication: 2007.

3. Record Number: 12611
Author(s): Denny-Brown, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : How Philosophy Matters: Death, Sex, Clothes, and Boethius [Lady Philosophy’s garment has an important symbolic significance, yet Boethius still depicts it as a material object. The materiality of Philosophy’s garment unsettles her supposed status as a purely immaterial abstraction. The corporeal status of her sexually-violated body and the gaps in her garment align her with the Muses of Poetry, negating a perception of Philosophy as pure, perfect, or whole. Her imperfect garment and female body thus symbolize human loss, corruption and mortality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Mediaevalia , 28., 2 ( 2007):  Pages 177 - 191.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 7401
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage, Sexual Pleasure, and Learned Brides in the Wedding Orations of Fifteenth-Century Italy
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 55., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 379 - 433.
Year of Publication: 2002.

5. Record Number: 8852
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : (In)Famous Men: The Continence of Scipio and Formations of Masculinity in Fifteenth-Century Tuscan Domestic Painting [The author explores the representation of Scipio Africanus in Florentine "cassoni" paintings on wedding furniture and argues for a range of masculinities. Some paintings celebrate his sexual restraint with Scipio returning the captured princess to her betrothed. However, other paintings present him as a conqueror with booty, an exemplar of masculine financial and political success for the bridegroom viewer. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 109 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 8054
Author(s): Damen, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hrotsvit's "Callimachus" and the Art of Comedy [The author provides a brief introduction to his English translation of Hrotsvitha's play, "Callimachus." He concentrates on the classical sources and the comedic elements that were revealed through performance. He also discusses the challenges of translating Hrotsvitha's humor, both verbal and visual. The Latin text and the author's English translation are appended. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women Writing Latin from Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe. Volume 2: Medieval Women Writing Latin.   Edited by Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey .   Routledge, 2002. Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 37 - 91.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 6974
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Le cadavre adoré: Sappho à Byzance? [The author argues that, although Sappho was admired by Byzantine writers, she was quoted very sparingly. This was because her complete texts were no longer available; only grammatical texts and rhetoric handbooks preserved short excerpts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantion , 71., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 233 - 250.
Year of Publication: 2001.

8. Record Number: 7904
Author(s): Amsler, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rape and Silence: Ovid's Mythography and Medieval Readers
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Byzantion , 71., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 61 - 96.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 7439
Author(s): Giovini, Marco.
Contributor(s):
Title : O admirabile Veneris ydolum: un carme d'amore paidico del X secolo e il mito di Deucalione ["O admirabile Veneris ydolum" is the oldest surviving Latin love poem from the Middle Ages. The poem is a pastiche of classical allusions. Among these is a reference to the tale of Deucalion and Pyrrha who repopulated the earth by throwing stones (the bones of Mother Earth) over their shoulders. The poet knew this story through Ovid. The article includes the text of the Latin poem and an Italian translation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studi Medievali , 40., 1 (Giugno 1999):  Pages 261 - 278.
Year of Publication: 1999.

10. Record Number: 3772
Author(s): Whitney, Elspeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Witches, Saints and Other "Others": Women and Deviance in Medieval Culture [The author provides an introductory overview of the ideas about women that set the stage for the witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999. Byzantion , 71., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 295 - 312.
Year of Publication: 1999.

11. Record Number: 3395
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Dominus/"Ancilla": Rhetorical Subjectivity and Sexual Violence in the Letters of Heloise
Source: The Tongue of the Fathers: Gender and Ideology in Twelfth-Century Latin.   Edited by David Townsend and Andrew Taylor .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. Studi Medievali , 40., 1 (Giugno 1999):  Pages 35 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1998.

12. Record Number: 3403
Author(s): Kennedy, Angus J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Florus and Diocletian: A Crux in Christine de Pizan's "Livre du Corps de Policie [note explaining Christine's reference to Florus; the source was actually from the "Flores Chronicorum"].
Source: Medium Aevum , 67., 2 ( 1998):  Pages 313 - 315.
Year of Publication: 1998.

13. Record Number: 1914
Author(s): O'Connor, Eugene.
Contributor(s):
Title : Panormita's Reply to His Critics: The "Hermaphroditus" and the Literary Defense
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 50, 4 (Winter 1997): 985-1010. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

14. Record Number: 2573
Author(s): Varriano, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Leonardo's Lost "Medusa" and Other Medici Medusas from the "Tazza Farnese" to Caravaggio
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 130., 1544 (septembre 1997):  Pages 73 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1997.

15. Record Number: 7939
Author(s): Baldassarri, Stefano Ugo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Adfluit incautis insidiosus amor: la precettistica Ovidiana nel "Filostrato" di Boccaccio [Boccaccio's "Filostrato" makes extensive use of Ovid's works, particularly in its account of Troilus and Criseyde. Ovid's "Heroides" was a particular source for the account of Helena and Paris. "Filostrato" was a youthful work, more dependent on classical models than were Boccaccio's mature writings.]
Source: Rivista di Studi Italiani , 14., 2 (Dicembre 1996):  Pages 20 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1996.

16. Record Number: 647
Author(s): O' Connor, Eugene.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hell's Pit and Heaven's Rose: The Typology of Female Sights and Smells in Panormita's "Hermaphroditus"
Source: Medievalia Et Humanistica New Series , 23., ( 1996):  Pages 25 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1996.

17. Record Number: 5505
Author(s): Escot, Pozzi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hildegard's Christianity: An Assimilation of Pagan and Ancient Classical Traditions
Source: Wisdom Which Encircles Circles: Papers on Hildegard of Bingen.   Edited by Audrey Ekdahl Davidson .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1996. Medievalia Et Humanistica New Series , 23., ( 1996):  Pages 53 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1996.

18. Record Number: 3495
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Marks of the Hidden Flame: Three Faces of Dido in Curial e Güelfa
Source: Neophilologus , 80., 1 (January 1996):  Pages 53 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1996.

19. Record Number: 1987
Author(s): Mango, Marlia Mundell.
Contributor(s):
Title : Artemis at Daphne [mythological hunting motifs on brass buckets and a mosaic pavement at Daphne near Antioch are analyzed].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 263 Issue title: Bosphorus: Essays in the Honour of Cyril Mango. Ed. by Stephanos Efthymiadis, Claudia Rapp, and Dimitris Tsougarakis.
Year of Publication: 1995.

20. Record Number: 367
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman, Authority, and the Book in the Middle Ages [a female author's response to Richard de Fournival's "Bestiaire d' Amour"].
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Medievalia Et Humanistica New Series , 23., ( 1996):  Pages 61 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1995.

21. Record Number: 935
Author(s): Calabrese, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Citations from Antiquity in Renaissance Medical Treatises on Love [physicians viewed erotic love as a pathological state akin to melancholy].
Source: Parergon: Bulletin of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Renaissance Studies. New Series , 12., 1 (July 1994):  Pages 1 - 13.
Year of Publication: 1994.

22. Record Number: 1486
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Nude Judith from Padua and the Reception of Donatello's Bronze David [argues that the bronze statuette of Judith is modelled on Donatello's David and shares with it an ambiguous, eroticized vision of the usual heroic nude].
Source: Comitatus , 25., ( 1994):  Pages 59 - 80. [contributions are accepted from graduate students and those who have received their doctorate within the last three years]
Year of Publication: 1994.

23. Record Number: 1549
Author(s): Anderson, J. C. and M. J. Jeffreys
Contributor(s):
Title : The Decoration of the Sevastokratorissa's Tent [Greek text, English translation, and commentary on two poems describing Eirene's tent; the authors see parallels in the secular motifs of muses and peacocks with decorations found on ivory boxes].
Source: Byzantion , 64., 1 ( 1994):  Pages 8 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1994.

24. Record Number: 2641
Author(s): Fontaine, Resianne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The facts of Life: The Nature of the Female Contribution to Generation According to Judah ha-Cohen's "Midrash ha-Hokhma" and Contemporary Texts [influences of Aristotle, Galen, Averroes, Avicenna, and rabbinic thought on Judah ha-Cohen's explanation in his encyclopedia, "Midrash ha-Hokhma"; brief consideration of the female contribution toward human reproduction in two other thirteenth-century Jewish encyclopedias, Shemtov Ibn Falaquera's "De ‘ot ha-Pilosofim" and Gershom ben Salomo's "Sh‘ar ha-Shamayim"].
Source: Medizinhistorisches Journal , 29., 4 ( 1994):  Pages 333 - 362.
Year of Publication: 1994.

25. Record Number: 7943
Author(s): Whitney, Susan B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Flexippe [The author suggests that the name Flexippe for one of the nieces of Criseyde is intended to remind readers of Plexippus, Meleager's uncle, whom Meleager slays for taking his gift from Atalanta. This portion of "Troilus and Criseyde" has a number of allusions to tragic figures and events which color Criseyde's gradual acceptance of the love of Troilus. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: English Language Notes , 30., 2 (December 1992):  Pages 1 - 4.
Year of Publication: 1992.

26. Record Number: 11068
Author(s): Nichols, Stephen G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France’s Commonplaces [In her lais, Marie espouses the low culture of oral tradition and Breton folk tales over the literate Latin tradition, which was held in high esteem. The poetic technique of her lais combines classical rhetoric and popular narrative elements (like the use of vernacular and common proverbs). Her innovative use of commonplaces departs from Classical traditions and reforms the attitudes toward women and sexuality expressed in canonical Latin poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 134-148. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

27. Record Number: 11070
Author(s): Huot, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Daisy and the Laurel: Myths of Desire and Creativity in the Poetry of John Froissart [Froissart’s poetic persona fuses the identities of the cleric and the lover, and thus his poetry is both learned and secular. He adapts Ovidian myths (particularly those focusing on Apollo, a figure of both poetry and wisdom) to construct a mythographic basis for his intellectualized poetic identity and love psychology. At the same time, he adapts numerous mythic allusions to transform the daisy into a symbol of erotic desire, loss, and memory. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 240-251. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

28. Record Number: 12694
Author(s): O'Connor, Eugene M.
Contributor(s):
Title : More on the "Priapeum" of Jacobus Cremonensis [This fifteenth century Latin poem describes an erotic encounter between the Classical fertility god Priapus and the nymph Dione. The author corrects and expands the commentary written on the poem by a previous editor, Ian Thompson. In his commentary, Thompson failed to recognize that many of the Latin terms in the poem are not euphemisms but sexually explicit terms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 389 - 391.
Year of Publication: 1990.

29. Record Number: 12699
Author(s): Brown, David Alan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Leonardo and the Ladies with the Ermine and the Book [Although Isabella d'Este and Cecilia Gallerani were both active, fashionable, and learned patrons of letters, Leonardo da Vinci (who was patronized by both) depicts the women very differently in his paintings. Cecilia appears in Leonardo's "Lady with the Ermine" as a lively woman whose gaze faces the viewer, but Isabella d'Este appears in Leonardo's drawings as more stately and reserved, sometimes pointing at a book. Isabella likely played a large role in shaping her own image in her portraits, preferring more formal and Classical motifs including the profile pose. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 11., 21 ( 1990):  Pages 47 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1990.

30. Record Number: 12744
Author(s): Balas, Edith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cybele and Her Cult in Andrea Mantegna's "The Triumph of Caesar" [English adaptation of French abstract: The article explains in detail the presence, never before noted, of the pagan goddess Cybele in the series of paintings by Mantegna, "The Triumph of Caesar." Mantegna draws upon Classical and early medieval art and literature in order to present Cybele in different roles: political, military, and religious. The author analyzes Cybele in relation to her cult, suggesting that, during the time of Julius Caesar, she became a national goddess. She was carried along from Gaul by the army for protection, and was brought into Rome in triumph as a spoil of war. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 115., (January 1990):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1990.

31. Record Number: 12735
Author(s): Garland, Lynda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Be Amorous, But Be Chaste…’: Sexual morality in Byzantine learned and vernacular romance [Aristocratic Byzantine readers enjoyed romances, which often derived tales of love and adventure from Hellenstic or ancient Greek influences and traditions. From the twelfth century onwards, authors of romances in Greek often borrowed themes from ancient pagan texts including the idea of passionate erotic love, yet unlike Classical authors, Byzantine writers strictly presented marriage as the ultimate goal to which all characters strive. Despite threats to their chastity, these romances featured heroes and heroines who remain chaste until the wedding ceremony that ends the story. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 14., ( 1990):  Pages 62 - 120.
Year of Publication: 1990.

32. Record Number: 12747
Author(s): Emison, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Word Made Naked in Pollaiuolo's "Battle of the Nudes" [It is unknown whether Antonio Pollaiuolo's late fifteenth century engraving of nude men engaged in battle refers to a text or not. While previous depictions of nude males (such as figures of David) often relied upon an explicit or implicit textual reference and depicted the youthful male as the ideal of masculine beauty, Pollaiulo's engraving does not clearly invoke any text and offers a virile, adult ideal for the male nude. Interpretations of the engraving have varied, as some of the items throughout the image (such as weapons and chains) could have allegorical significance if they are interpreted as iconography. The author suggests that works of art produced during Pollaiuolo's time that feature nudes, which some have tried to interpret as depicting certain classical myths, epics, or moments in history, may communicate as images without reference to any text. Artists may produce works of art for purely formal or aesthetic reasons with no subject or text in mind. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Art History , 13., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 261 - 275.
Year of Publication: 1990.

33. Record Number: 11196
Author(s): Ahern, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nudi Grammantes: The Grammar and Rhetoric of Deviation in Inferno XV [Male genitalia have a complex range of metaphorical meanings. Certain writers in the medieval rhetorical tradition align sexuality and rhetoric, comparing forms unorthodox sexuality (like sodomy) with perversions of language. Most notably, Brunetto Latini, a grammarian and sodomite who appears in the Inferno, uses a series of puns involving the word “fico” (fig or tree), confusing the word’s natural (biological) and grammatical gender. In Latin and Italian, this word (meaning both tree and fruit) could metaphorically stand for either the male or the female sexual organs. Brunetto’s learned yet ambiguous use of language thus suggests his own sexual deviancy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 4 ( 1990):  Pages 466 - 486.
Year of Publication: 1990.

34. Record Number: 28577
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Fanciulla [Young Girl]
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Andrea_del_verrocchio_%28cerchia%29%2C_una_fanciulla%2C_1475-85.JPG/250px-Andrea_del_verrocchio_%28cerchia%29%2C_una_fanciulla%2C_1475-85.JPG
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35. Record Number: 28579
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Profile of a Woman
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/83/Antonio_del_Pollaiolo_-_Portrait_of_a_Young_Woman_-_WGA18048.jpg/250px-Antonio_del_Pollaiolo_-_Portrait_of_a_Young_Woman_-_WGA18048.jpg
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36. Record Number: 28718
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of a Woman
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Antonio_Pollaiuolo_005.jpg/250px-Antonio_Pollaiuolo_005.jpg
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37. Record Number: 28727
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of a Woman
Source:
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38. Record Number: 28730
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Medal of Giulia Astallia (obverse)
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Giancristoforo_romano_%28attr.%29,_giulia_astrallia,_1485_c.,_recto.JPG/250px-Giancristoforo_romano_%28attr.%29,_giulia_astrallia,_1485_c.,_recto.JPG
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39. Record Number: 28738
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of a Woman
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Jacometto_Veneziano_008.jpg/250px-Jacometto_Veneziano_008.jpg
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40. Record Number: 28744
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of a Man and Woman at a Casement
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Lippo_lippi_woman.jpg/250px-Lippo_lippi_woman.jpg
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41. Record Number: 28750
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Rebecca and Eliezer
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Meister_der_Wiener_Genesis_002.jpg/250px-Meister_der_Wiener_Genesis_002.jpg
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42. Record Number: 28751
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Young Lady of Fashion
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Paolo_Ucello_001.jpg/250px-Paolo_Ucello_001.jpg
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43. Record Number: 28753
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Federico da Montefeltro and His Wife Battista Sforza
Source:
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44. Record Number: 28754
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Simonetta Vespucci as Cleopatra
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Piero_di_Cosimo_043.jpg/250px-Piero_di_Cosimo_043.jpg
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45. Record Number: 28761
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Simonetta Vespucci as Mythological Nymph
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Sandro_Botticelli_-_weiBliches_Brustbild.png/250px-Sandro_Botticelli_-_weiBliches_Brustbild.png
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46. Record Number: 28818
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Dukatenkacker (“Ducat Shitter”)
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Dukatenschei%C3%9Fer_Hotel_Kaiserworth_Goslar.jpg/250px-Dukatenschei%C3%9Fer_Hotel_Kaiserworth_Goslar.jpg
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47. Record Number: 28841
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Pallas and the Centaur
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/aa/Palas_y_el_Centauro.jpg/250px-Palas_y_el_Centauro.jpg
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48. Record Number: 28929
Author(s):
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Title : Pyramus and Thisbe
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/33/Cambrai_221109_02_Pyrame_et_Thisb%C3%A9.jpg/250px-Cambrai_221109_02_Pyrame_et_Thisb%C3%A9.jpg
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49. Record Number:
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Title : Women's Bath
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/8c/Albrecht_D%C3%BCrer_-_The_Women%27s_Bath_-_WGA7041.jpg/250px-Albrecht_D%C3%BCrer_-_The_Women%27s_Bath_-_WGA7041.jpg
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50. Record Number:
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Title : Men's Bath
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/a0/D%C3%BCrer_-_Das_M%C3%A4nnerbad.jpg/250px-D%C3%BCrer_-_Das_M%C3%A4nnerbad.jpg
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51. Record Number: 30909
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Title : Primavera (Spring)
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52. Record Number: 30915
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Title : Birth of Venus
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53. Record Number: 30918
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Title : Expulsion from Eden
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54. Record Number: 30919
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Title : Temptation of the Idler/Dream of the Doctor
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55. Record Number: 30920
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Title : Four Witches/Four Naked Women
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56. Record Number: 30921
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Title : Obsequies of St. Fina
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57. Record Number: 30925
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Title : Moon
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58. Record Number: 30951
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Title : Medal of Cecilia Gonzaga (reverse)
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59. Record Number:
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Title : Profile of a Woman
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60. Record Number:
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Title : Diptych Panel, detail, Personification of Rome
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61. Record Number:
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Title : Casket Panel with Rape of Europa
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62. Record Number:
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Title : Probus Magnus Panel
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63. Record Number:
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Title : Arcita and Palemone Admire Emilia in Her Garden
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64. Record Number: 30953
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Title : The Story of Paris
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65. Record Number: 30962
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Title : Visitation
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66. Record Number: 31500
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Title : Claudia Quinta
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67. Record Number: 31857
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Title : Ariadne with a Maenad and Satyr
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68. Record Number: 35436
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Title : Disc Brooch with Bust of a Helmeted Woman, probably Athena
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69. Record Number: 35566
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Title : Sappho teaching her students
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70. Record Number: 37478
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Title : Symmachi tablet
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71. Record Number: 37630
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Title : Hestia Polyolbos tapestry
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72. Record Number: 37636
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Title : Dido on her funeral pyre
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73. Record Number: 37662
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Title : Plate with Venus and Adonis
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