Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


Translation of the Month

November 2017 [Posted November 2018]

Legenda vetus, Acta processus canonizationis, et Miracula Sanctae Margaritae de Hungaria = The Oldest Legend, Acts of the Canonization Process, and Miracles of Saint Margaret of Hungary. Central European University Press, 2018. ISBN 9789633862186.

Simone Martini, Female saint identified by some scholars as Saint Margaret of Hungary
Simone Martini, Female saint identified by some scholars as Saint Margaret of Hungary, circa 1330, Assisi, Lower Basilica of Saint Francis (Source: Wikimedia Commons, public domain)

"This bilingual volume (Latin text with English translation) is the second in the series presenting hagiographical narratives from medieval Central Europe. It contains the most important hagiographical corpus of medieval Hungarian history: that of Saint Margaret (1242–1270), daughter of King Béla IV, who lived her life as a Dominican nun. Margaret's cult started immediately after her death and the demand to examine her sanctity was first formulated in 1272. The canonization process recommenced in 1276, followed by further initiatives across the centuries. Margaret was eventually canonized only in 1943.

Besides the full Latin text and the English translation of her oldest legend, written between 1272 and 1275, this volume contains the acts of the 110 testimonies of the papal investigation concerning her sainthood, recorded between July and October 1276 and prepared from existing source editions. In addition, the editors include a series of recently discovered documents, including a petition by the bishop of Várad (Oradea) to promote the cause, and the notarial records of a set of miracles that occurred at Margaret's grave in the second half of the fifteenth century.

The book ends with a selected bibliography of Saint Margaret and of her hagiography."—Description reproduced from the publisher's website.

Ikone der Heiligen Eudokia, Einlegearbeit in Stein und Elfenbein, 10. Jh.Indexers select a translation each month that is significant in the ideas it presents.  This gives users an opportunity to see a range of newly translated medieval works of importance for women's and gender studies.  It also will build an archive of references to translations that will be useful as classroom readings.

Depending upon the content, an entire work may be indexed as a single title like the vita of a saint or the collected cartularies of a countess.  But in many cases the translation deals only in part with issues involving women and gender.  In those instances, indexing goes to a deeper level, identifying and describing specific sections within a text.  For example, there are 93 records for pertinent sections in the Siete Partidas.

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