Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


175 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 29257
Author(s): Neff, Amy,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Humble Man's Wedding: Two Late Thirteenth-Century Franciscan Images of the "Miracle at Cana" : [The author analyzes two Franciscan-inspired paintings of the Miracle at Cana, a fresco in the Upper Church of San Francesco in Assisi and a full-page illustration in the “Supplicationes variae,” a devotional manual. Neff traces iconography and theolog
Source: Gothic Art and Thought in the Later Medieval Period: Essays in Honor of Willibald Sauerländer.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Penn State University Press, 2011.  Pages 292 - 323.
Year of Publication: 2011.

2. Record Number: 20001
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading the Annunciation
Source: Art History , 30., 3 (June 2007):  Pages 349 - 363.
Year of Publication: 2007.

3. Record Number: 19219
Author(s): Leone, Stephanie C.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Vogue in Fifteenth-Century Florence: The Material Culture of Marriage [In this short, introductory essay for an art exhibit, the author surveys the meaning of the sumptuously painted wedding chest ("cassone") given by the groom and used to transport the bride's trousseau. The rich iconography of specific "cassoni" is discussed including the Meeting of Esther. Title Note Supplied by Feminae].
Source: Secular Sacred: 11th-16th Century Works from the Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.   Edited by Nancy Netzer .   McMullen Museum of Art, 2006. Art History , 30., 3 (June 2007):  Pages 81 - 87.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 20339
Author(s): Ricci, Alessio
Contributor(s):
Title : Recorsivita e semplicita delle "visioni" di Francesca Romana: su alcuni aspetti sintattici e testuali del discorso mistico [The Latin translation of Giovanni Mattioti's collection of evidence for the sanctity of Frances of Rome leaves out the flavor of the Italian original. The iconography of Frances' visions is described, but some of her less tactful remarks also are exclude
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Studies in Iconography , 27., ( 2006):  Pages 231 - 255.
Year of Publication: 2006.

5. Record Number: 11759
Author(s): Hayum, Andrée
Contributor(s):
Title : A Renaissance Audience Considered: The Nuns at S. Apollonia and Castagno's "Last Supper" [The author explores the possible meanings of the Castagno fresco for the nuns who commissioned the work for their refectory in the monastery of Santa Apollonia in Florence. Hayum notes Castagno's dramatic effects in the scale of figures and the spatial illusion. This kind of immediacy fits with the numerous decoration in the monastery representing nuns recieving blessings from Saint Apollonia and praying before Christ on the crucifix. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Art Bulletin , 88., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 243 - 266.
Year of Publication: 2006.

6. Record Number: 20779
Author(s): Meyer, Mati
Contributor(s):
Title : The Levite's Concubine: Imaging the Marginal Woman in Byzantine Society [Provides comparative discussion of different representations of the rape of the concubine within the corpus of illuminated Byzantine manuscripts; extrapolates on what these different representations -particularly of clothing--reveal about contemporary clergy's attitudes towards the concepts of women, sexuality, and the function of marriage. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 27., ( 2006):  Pages 45 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2006.

7. Record Number: 14022
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Spectacular Celebration of the Assumption in Siena
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 58., 2 (Summer 2005):  Pages 435 - 463.
Year of Publication: 2005.

8. Record Number: 20783
Author(s): Sarit, Shalev-Eyni
Contributor(s):
Title : In the Days of the Barley Harvest: the Iconography of Ruth [Provides a comparative study of the iconographic devices used in the Tripartite Mahzor and the Padua Bible to represent the story of Ruth. Special attention is paid to how the relationship of the illustrations in the two documents reflects contemporary Christian interest in Jewish pictorial tradition. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 51., ( 2005):  Pages 37 - 58.
Year of Publication: 2005.

9. Record Number: 14123
Author(s): Bleyerveld, Yvonne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Powerful Women, Foolish Men: The Popularity of the "Power of Women" Topos in Art [The author briefly describes the subject matter, themes, and audiences for the Power of Women topos. Biblical stories and classical myths provided the narratives in which dominant women humiliated the men who were in love with them. Bleyerveld argues tha
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005. Artibus et Historiae , 51., ( 2005):  Pages 166 - 175.
Year of Publication: 2005.

10. Record Number: 14630
Author(s): Elliott, Janis and Cordelia Warr
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction [The authors briefly survey Angevin patronage, the nuns' practices, the pictorial program, and the architectural scheme of the church of Santa Maria Donna Regina in Naples. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Artibus et Historiae , 51., ( 2005):  Pages 1 - 12.
Year of Publication: 2004.

11. Record Number: 10830
Author(s): Hamburger, Jeffrey F.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Various Writings of Humanity": Johannes Tauler on Hildegard of Bingen's "Scivias" [The author analyzes Tauler's sermon delivered in Cologne to the Dominican nuns of St. Gertrude's in 1339. The sermon concerns in part an image in the nuns' refectory which was a copy of an illustration from Hildegard's "Scivias." Hamburger argues that Tauler adapts her visions to his particular needs, both as a mystic and a preacher. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 167 - 191. Printed in an extended version in Visual Culture and the German Middle Ages. Edited by Kathryn Starkey and Horst Wenzel. Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. New Middle Ages series. Pages 161-205.
Year of Publication: 2004.

12. Record Number: 11059
Author(s): Bisogni, Fabio.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'iconografia mariana nei secoli XI-XII [The cult of the Virgin Mary was adopted by ruling elites, lay and clerical, in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Seated figures of the Madonna, facing the viewer with the infant Jesus on her lap, predominated with their expressions of the superiority of spiritual power. These derived from Byzantine models, and less formal poses were evolved only later. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Figure poetiche e figure teologiche nella mariologia dei secoli XI e XII: Atti del II Convegno Mariologico della Fondazione Ezio Franceschini con la collaborazione della Biblioteca Palatina di Parma, Parma, 19-20 maggio 2000.   Edited by Clelia Maria Piastra and Francesco Santi .   SISMEL, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 31 - 43.
Year of Publication: 2004.

13. Record Number: 14634
Author(s): Michalsky, Tanja.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mater serenissimi principis: The Tomb of Maria of Hungary
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 61 - 77.
Year of Publication: 2004.

14. Record Number: 18562
Author(s): Bacci, Michele
Contributor(s):
Title : Kathreptis, o la Veronica della Vergine [The author explores the iconography of the mother of God from Byzantine and early Russian motifs to late medieval Italian images. The Aracoeli Madonna was the most imporant of the Western pictures of the virgin attributed to the evangelist Luke. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 11 - 37.
Year of Publication: 2004.

15. Record Number: 20789
Author(s): Stanbury, Sarah
Contributor(s):
Title : The clock in Filippino Lippi's Annunciation Tondo [Investigates the significance of Lippi's inclusion of a mechanical clock in his painting of the Annunciation in Gimignano through comparative analysis of contemporary works by Ghirlandaio and Botticelli. Issues of the cultural transition from feudal to merchant economy and domestic order are discussed, and the significance of the clock as a memento mori is disputed. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 197 - 219.
Year of Publication: 2004.

16. Record Number: 11407
Author(s): Lifshitz, Felice.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Persistence of Late Antiquity: Christ as Man and Woman in an Eighth-Century Miniature [The author discusses a miniature in which she argues that Christ is portrayed twice, once as the crucified Jesus and beneath as a female blessing figure. Lifshitz connects this to an intellectual milieu in which aristocratic women in monastic double houses were used to having spiritual authority. Furthermore they had access to late antique sources with similar outlooks including the Priscillianist tractates and the "Apocryphal Acts of the Apostles." Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 18 - 27.
Year of Publication: 2004.

17. Record Number: 14636
Author(s): Yakou, Hisashi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Contemplating Angels and the "Madonna of the Apocalypse" [The author briefly discusses antecedents for the nuns' elevated choir and then turns to the church's frescoes. Yakou in particular focuses on the "Angelic Choirs" and the "Madonna of the Apocalypse" in terms both of iconography and meditative use by the Clarissan nuns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 93 - 107.
Year of Publication: 2004.

18. Record Number: 14639
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Golden Legend" and the Cycle of the "Life of Saint Elizabeth of Thuringia-Hungary" [The author briefly traces various lives of Saint Elizabeth as sources for the cycle of paintings in Santa Maria Donna Regina. Warr also argues that as patron Mary of Hungary was involved in the project's plans especially for those paintings that honored her great-aunt Elizabeth and celebrated the sanctity of the Arpád and Anjou lines. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 155 - 174.
Year of Publication: 2004.

19. Record Number: 14638
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Passion Cycle": Images to Contemplate and Imitate amid Clarissan "clausura" [The author argues that the passion cycle in the church of Santa Maria Donna Regina emphasized an "imitatio Mariae," a devotion to the Eucharist, and Franciscan concerns for female viewers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Medieval Feminist Forum , 38., (Winter 2004):  Pages 129 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2004.

20. Record Number: 20788
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Immersed in Things of the Body: Humor and Meaning in the Annunciation by Filippo Lippi [Examines the background figures in Lippi's Annunciation at the Palazzo Barberini and the significance of their gesture and movement as an iconographic foil to the interaction between Mary and the Archangel Gabriel; examines the parallels between the work's composition and the use of humor in contemporary drama in illustrating themes of Christ's incarnation. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 173 - 196.
Year of Publication: 2004.

21. Record Number: 12606
Author(s): Starkey, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Tristan” Slippers: An Image of Adultery or a Symbol of Marriage? [Leather slippers decorated with iconography apparently representing the adulterous courtly couple Tristan and Isolde were popular in the urban centers of the Low Countries, and these shoes were perhaps given as bridal gifts or in betrothal ceremonies. Although the image of an adulterous couple may not seem appropriate for shoes associated with marriage, other iconography on the slippers (such as an orchard, falcon, chessboard, and literary inscriptions) and contemporary Dutch literature about the Tristan story indicate that the urban public was reappropriating elements of courtly culture. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 35 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2004.

22. Record Number: 11424
Author(s): Candelaria, Lorenzo.
Contributor(s):
Title : El Cavaller de Colunya. A Miracle of the Rosary in the Choirbooks of San Pedro Mártir de Toledo
Source: Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 221 - 264.
Year of Publication: 2004.

23. Record Number: 14640
Author(s): Elliott, Janis.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Last Judgement": The Cult of Sacral Kingship and Dynastic Hopes for the Afterlife [The author argues that Queen Mary of Hungary used her royal patronage to create an iconography that was personally meaningful to her as well as an embodiment of the dynastic concerns of the Angevin house. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 175 - 193.
Year of Publication: 2004.

24. Record Number: 10782
Author(s): Field, Richard S.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fifteenth-Century Woodcut of the "Death of the Virgin" in a Manuscript of "Der Stachel der Liebe" [The author examines the development and meaning of an iconographic theme, the figure of the kneeling Virgin in woodcut scenes of the Dormition. This devotional image presented Mary as humankind's stongest intercessor with both her son and God. It also served as a model for the good death with Mary kneeling in pious prayer as her earthly life ends. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 71 - 137.
Year of Publication: 2003.

25. Record Number: 8068
Author(s): Sheingorn, Pamela.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wise Mother : The Image of St.Anne Teaching the Virgin Mary [The author argues that medieval images of Saint Anne teaching the Virgin have been ignored by scholars. As a result both the importance of mothers as teachers and the prevalence of literacy among upper and middle class women has been downplayed. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 105 - 134. This article was first published in Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 32, 1 (1993): 69-80. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

26. Record Number: 12879
Author(s): Marchand, Eckart.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monastic "Imitatio Christi": Andrea del Castagno's "Cenacolo di S. Apollonia"
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 47., ( 2003):  Pages 31 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2003.

27. Record Number: 16586
Author(s): Hults, Linda C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dürer's "Four Witches" Reconsidered [The author argues that Dürer's engraving should be viewed in conjunction with the "Malleus maleficarum" as part of the developing theory on women's sexuality and witchcraft. Hults suggests that Dürer cleverly combined a variety of visual allusions includ
Source: Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Jane L. Carroll and Alison G. Stewart .   Ashgate, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 94 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2003.

28. Record Number: 10783
Author(s): Jones, Leslie C. and Jonathan J. G. Alexander
Contributor(s):
Title : The Annunciation to the Shepherdess [The authors explore the representation of shepherdesses in fifteenth century deluxe books of hours. There are a variety of types including eroticized figures, pious saint-like young women, and disorderly peasant dancers. The authors suggest that in many cases differences in social class are being emphasized for noble owners (both male and female) of these books of hours. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 165 - 198.
Year of Publication: 2003.

29. Record Number: 10903
Author(s): Schowalter, Kathleen S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Ingeborg Psalter: Queenship, Legitimacy, and the Appropriation of Byzantine Art in the West [Ingeberg of Denmark married Philippe Auguste, but he repudiated her the following day. She insisted on her legitimacy for twenty years before being restored. Schowalter argues that her psalter models itself on the one belonging to Queen Melisande and that changes in the iconography were made deliberately to emphasize Ingeborg's queenship including representations of anointing and coronation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 99 - 135.
Year of Publication: 2003.

30. Record Number: 8713
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Hyr Wombe Insaciate: The Iconography of the Feminised Monster [The author examines woodcuts and a painting in which the monsters are both feminized and sexualized. The author argues that they refer to a type of femininity that is both sexual and bestial. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies on Medieval and Early Modern Women: Pawns or Players?   Edited by Christine Meek and Catherine Lawless .   Four Courts Press, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 177 - 196.
Year of Publication: 2003.

31. Record Number: 10906
Author(s): Hamilton, Tracy Chapman.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queenship and Kinship in the French "Bible moralisée": The Example of Blanche of Castile and Vienna ÖNB 2554 [The author argues that the manuscript was commissioned by Blanche possibly during the early period of her regency. The repeated images of childbirth and Sainte Église in the illuminations emphasize Blanche's particular rights as mother and authorized regent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 177 - 208.
Year of Publication: 2003.

32. Record Number: 12880
Author(s): Michalski, Sergiusz.
Contributor(s):
Title : Venus as Semiramis: A New Interpretation of the Central Figure of Botticelli's "Primavera"
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 48., ( 2003):  Pages 213 - 222.
Year of Publication: 2003.

33. Record Number: 9056
Author(s): Williamson, Beth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Liturgical Image or Devotional Image? The London "Madonna of the Firescreen" [The author examines this midfifteenth century panel of Virgin and Child and argues that it was intended for devotional use. The viewer would be drawn to contemplate the mystery of the Incarnation through subtle reminders like the breast milk of the Virgin and the Christ child's genitals. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Objects, Imafges, and the Word: Art in the Service of the Liturgy.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2003. Artibus et Historiae , 48., ( 2003):  Pages 298 - 318.
Year of Publication: 2003.

34. Record Number: 11434
Author(s): Dunlop, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Flesh and the Feminine: Early-Renaissance Images of the Madonna with Eve at Her Feet
Source: Oxford Art Journal , 25., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 127 - 147.
Year of Publication: 2002.

35. Record Number: 6637
Author(s): Riches, Samantha J. E.
Contributor(s):
Title : St. George as a Male Virgin Martyr [the author argues that Saint George's representation borrowed from the female virgin martyrs to establish his virginity as a third gender; stories and images also emphasized his chastity by his connection to the Virgin Mary and his defeat of sexualized dragons].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002. Oxford Art Journal , 25., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 65 - 85.
Year of Publication: 2002.

36. Record Number: 9499
Author(s): Newman, Marsha.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christian Cosmology in Hildegard of Bingen's Illuminations [The author argues that Hildegard used her knowledge of natural forces to express spiritual truths. Her illuminations of mandalas, symmetrical images framed by circular borders, represent her visions and frequently depict multiple planes of existence. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Logos: A Journal of Catholic Thought and Culture (Full Text via Project Muse) 5, 1 (Winter 2002): 41-61. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

37. Record Number: 10981
Author(s): Stanton, Anne Rudloff.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Psalter of Isabelle, Queen of England 1308-1330: Isabelle as the Audience [The illustrated psalter was produced as a gift for the young queen sometime between her betrothal and marriage. It presents Biblical role models for the edification of the queen. Stanton argues that the psalter is particularly noteworthy for its emphasis on official, maternal roles and for its use of bilingual texts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Word and Image , 18., 1 (January-March 2002):  Pages 1 - 27.
Year of Publication: 2002.

38. Record Number: 12273
Author(s): von Perger, Mischa.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wer pflückt die Rose? Beschriftete Heiligenschine bei Martin Schongauer [Author deciphers and interprets texts on halos in two of Schongauer's works. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 65., 3 ( 2002):  Pages 400 - 410.
Year of Publication: 2002.

39. Record Number: 6636
Author(s): Easton, Martha.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pain, Torture, and Death in the Huntington Library "Legenda aurea" [The author analyzes the manuscript illuminations representing the torture and executions of male and female martyrs, arguing that the binary system of gender was frequently transcended].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002. Artibus et Historiae , 47., ( 2003):  Pages 49 - 64.
Year of Publication: 2002.

40. Record Number: 6617
Author(s): Randolph, Adrian W. B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Renaissance Household Goddesses: Fertility, Politics, and the Gendering of the Spectatorship [the author argues that these terracotta statuettes of Dovizia (a woman with a basket of fruit on her head who is leading a little boy), based on Donatello's statue now lost, can be read both as an embodiment of wealth and fertility and as a political, public symbol of the city and reminder of the pre-Medicean era; the author explores the implications of both female and male spectatorship].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Artibus et Historiae , 47., ( 2003):  Pages 163 - 189.
Year of Publication: 2002.

41. Record Number: 8487
Author(s): Cotsonis, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin and Justinian on Seals of the "Ekklesiekdikoi" of Hagia Sophia [The author explores the various meanings carried by the seals made for the clerical tribunal from Hagia Sophia, which present the standing figures of the Virgin and the Emperor Justinian, holding between them a model of the church Hagia Sophia. The church building in part signifies a place of mercy and refuge. Justinian was not only the builder of the church but also the patron of the clerical tribunal. The Virgin was the most powerful intermediary and an object of hope for the penitent and those in trouble. The clerics from the tribunal turned to the Virgin Mary and Justinian for help in coming to just and merciful decisions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 56 (2002): 41-55. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

42. Record Number: 7248
Author(s): Bennett, Adelaide.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mary Magdalen's Seven Deadly Sins in a Thirteenth-Century Liège Psalter-Hours [The author explores the figure of a woman with an unguent jar who is holding seven disks spelling out "SALIGIA" (the initial letters of the seven vices) whom the author identifies as Mary Magdalene. Earlier Mary Magdalene was portrayed with seven demons fleeing from her body. In the thirteenth century this became associated with the seven deadly sins as Mary Magdalene's role as a penitent, converted sinner was emphasized. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002.  Pages 17 - 34.
Year of Publication: 2002.

43. Record Number: 7249
Author(s): Drewer, Lois.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jephthah and His Daughter in Medieval Art: Ambiguities of Heroism and Sacrifice [The author argues that the meaning of Jephthah's daughter's sacrifice fluctuates widely in medieval art and exegesis. The Biblical warrior Jephthah rashly promises God that he will offer in sacrifice the first person who greets him when he returns home after his victory over the Ammonites. Jephthah's daughter's death is figured as a type of the eucharist, a brave hero willing to give her life for her people, a virgin dedicated to God (sometimes walled into an anchorhold rather than killed) and, negatively, as synagogue concerned with worldly attractions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002.  Pages 35 - 59.
Year of Publication: 2002.

44. Record Number: 7253
Author(s): Gerát, Ivan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dei saturitas. St. Elizabeth's Works of Mercy in the Medieval Pictorial Narrative ["In this article, I examine a significant and unknown part of the pictorial tradition that surrounds St. Elizabeth in Central Europe and concentrate, in particular, on one group of scenes which can be generally referred to as her works of mercy. The significant questions of identity and differences within this group are analyzed. Some aspcts of these scenes changed very subtly; I evaluate these differences in relation to their historical context and consider how they reflected the development of liturgical and devotional practices. The main focus of this paper, however, is an evaluation of the theory that pictorial images of St. Elizabeth may be in imitation of those representing Christ." Page 168.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002.  Pages 168 - 181.
Year of Publication: 2002.

45. Record Number: 7251
Author(s): Guest, Gerald B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Picturing Women in the First "Bible moralisée" ["It is the goal of this article to extend the work of Chapman and Lowden through an examination of the iconography of women in what is likely the first "Bible moralisée," Ö.N.B. 2554. Beyond this, I wish to consider how a "Bible moralisée" might have been read by a royal woman in the first half of the thirteenth century and what this might tell us about the manuscripts as artistic projects." Page 108].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002.  Pages 106 - 130.
Year of Publication: 2002.

46. Record Number: 8851
Author(s): Blanton-Whetsell, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Imagines Aetheldredae: Mapping Hagiographic Representations of Abbatial Power and Religious Patronage [The author studies the veneration of Saint Æthelthryth (or Etheldreda) in England across the Middle Ages and across both lay and religious audiences. She argues that scholars frequently divide the evidence of a saint's cult along academic disciplinary lines. They thereby miss evidence that is crucial for their understanding of a saint and those who honored her. Appendix A is an extensive inventory of representations, texts, and buildings concerning or devoted to Saint Ethelreda. Known origins are also indicated. Appendix B is a chart that tabulates the data in Appendix A. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 55 - 107.
Year of Publication: 2002.

47. Record Number: 7870
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chastity, Love, and Marriage in the Margins of the "Wharncliffe Hours" [The author argues that the marginal illustrations in the "Wharncliffe Hours" represent the theme of marriage and its moral opposites including lust and rape. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reading Texts and Images: Essays on Medieval and Renaissance Art and Patronage in Honour of Margaret M. Manion.   Edited by Bernard J. Muir .   University of Exeter Press, 2002. Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 201 - 220.
Year of Publication: 2002.

48. Record Number: 6639
Author(s): Gill, Miriam.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Piety and Impiety: Selected Images of Women in Wall Paintings in England After 1300 [The author examines paintings on three themes: Saint Anne teaching the Virgin to read, the warning to gossips, and the seven corporal works of mercy; the three mural subjects all comment on desirable female behavior].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002. Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 101 - 120.
Year of Publication: 2002.

49. Record Number: 8090
Author(s): Laskaya, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Feminized World and Divine Violence: Texts and Images of the Apocalypse [The author argues that the illustrations in late medieval Apocalypse books present a triumphant militant masculinity opposed to a variety of feminized threats including the Great Whore of Babylon, monsters, and even the verdant earth. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 299 - 341.
Year of Publication: 2002.

50. Record Number: 10645
Author(s): Karkov, Catherine E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Broken Bodies and Singing Tongues: Gender and Voice in the Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 23 "Psychomachia" [The author argues that the Anglo-Saxon reader of the "Psychomachia" and the "Passio Sancti Romani" (also by Prudentius) was encouraged through text and illustrations to see the self as masculine and the body as feminine. Karkov notes that the Anglo-Saxon "Psychomachia" manuscripts were the first to depict the Virtues and Vices as primarily female, rather than the earlier practice of Virtues as male warriors and the Vices as monsters. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 30., ( 2001):  Pages 115 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2001.

51. Record Number: 5975
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Battle of the Sexes? Punishment as a Hermeneutic in Medieval Martyrdom Iconography
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Gesta , 40., 1 ( 2001):
Year of Publication: 2001.

52. Record Number: 6403
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Origin of Special Veneration of the Mother of God at the Trinity-Sergius Monastery: The Iconographical Evidence [the author argues that some form of special veneration of the Virgin Mary began at the Trinity Monastery in the first half of the fifteenth century; the representation of Mary appearing to Sergius and offering her protection did not take on a standard form during the late Middle Ages].
Source: Russian History , 28., 40182 ( 2001):  Pages 303 - 314. Festschrift for Thomas S. Noonan
Year of Publication: 2001.

53. Record Number: 6422
Author(s): Cohen, Adam S. and Anne Derbes
Contributor(s):
Title : Bernward and Eve at Hildesheim
Source: Gesta , 40., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 19 - 38.
Year of Publication: 2001.

54. Record Number: 5693
Author(s): Villers, Caroline, Robert Gibbs, Rebecca Hellen and Annette King
Contributor(s):
Title : Simone dei Crocefissi's "Dream of the Virgin" in the Society of Antiquaries, London [The authors discuss the cleaning and restoration of the painting, arguing that the expensive pigments and care taken by the artist indicate an important commission, perhaps for a women's monastery in Bologna].
Source: Burlington Magazine , 142., 1169 (August 2000):  Pages 481 - 486.
Year of Publication: 2000.

55. Record Number: 5446
Author(s): Chavasse, Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin Mary: Consoler, Protector, and Social Worker in Quattrocento Miracle Tales [The author examines women's problems and needs as represented in such miracle texts as the late fifteenth century "Miracoli della Vergine Maria" and the poem by Lorenzo de' Oppizi, "Miracoli della Vergine della Carcere," a catalog of the miracles worked
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000. Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 26., ( 2000):  Pages 138 - 164.
Year of Publication: 2000.

56. Record Number: 8677
Author(s): De Bingen, Hildegarde and Laurence. Moulinier
Contributor(s): Børresen, Kari Elisabeth, reviewer
Title : Rhetorical Images of the Virgin: The Icon of the "Usual Miracle" at the Blachernai [The author connects the icon of Mary at the Blachernai (which was revealed every Friday by the miraculous raising of a silk cover) with a new image-type in which Mary raises her hands in prayer and has a medallion that contains the Christ child hovering on her chest. The author argues that this image was influenced by Neoplatonic ideas to represent both the presence of the Holy Spirit and the embodiment of the incarnation. The author also connects the new image type to the Komnenoi dynasty which had various political reasons to champion orthodoxy. In the Appendix the author surveys publications on seals to identify instances of the orans Virgin with the hovering medallion. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Res: Anthropology and Aesthetics , 38., (Autumn 2000):  Pages 34 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2000.

57. Record Number: 5146
Author(s): Plesch, Véronique.
Contributor(s):
Title : Enguerrand Quarton's "Coronation of the Virgin": This World and the Next, the Dogma and the Devotion, the Individual and the Community [The author argues that the painting in the Carthusian hospital chapel linked the Coronation with the Last Judgement to emphasize the importance of Mary's role as mediator, especially for those souls in purgatory].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 26., 1 (Spring 2000):  Pages 189 - 221.
Year of Publication: 2000.

58. Record Number: 5362
Author(s): Smine, Rima E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin and Child Enthroned in Syriac Lectionaries: Vatican Syr. 559 and London British Library Add. 7170 and its Byzantine Origin
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 26., ( 2000):  Pages 110 - 111.
Year of Publication: 2000.

59. Record Number: 4636
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Viewing and Commissioning Pietro Lorenzetti's Saint Humility Polyptych
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 26., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 269 - 300.
Year of Publication: 2000.

60. Record Number: 4623
Author(s): Tarr, Roger P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ecce Virgo Concipiet: The Iconography and Context of Duccio's London "Annunciation"
Source: Viator , 31., ( 2000):  Pages 185 - 213.
Year of Publication: 2000.

61. Record Number: 5361
Author(s): O'Brien, Maureen Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Gynaeceum, the Kindergarten, and the Vienna Genesis: Biblical and Extra-Biblical Imagery in Folio 16r [The author addresses the question of the group of women and children in the illustration of Joseph and Potiphar's wife].
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 26., ( 2000):  Pages 109 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2000.

62. Record Number: 4354
Author(s): Tkacz, Catherine Brown.
Contributor(s):
Title : Susanna as a Type of Christ [the author argues that from late antiquity Susanna was widely understood as a type of Christ with Susanna in the garden as a type of Christ in Gethsemane and Susanna before Daniel as a type of Christ before Pilate; Appendix A lists forty-four works of art representing Susanna as a Christological type and Appendix B lists thirty-nine primary texts presenting Susanna as a Christological type].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 20., ( 1999):  Pages 101 - 153.
Year of Publication: 1999.

63. Record Number: 4443
Author(s): Monsour, Michele.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lady With the Unicorn
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 134., 1571 (décembre 1999):  Pages 237 - 254.
Year of Publication: 1999.

64. Record Number: 5689
Author(s): Cannon, Joanna
Contributor(s):
Title : The Stoclet "Man of Sorrows": A Thirteenth-century Italian Diptych Reunited [The author argues that the small panel formed a devotional diptych with a painting of the Virgin and Child; the author points out that the two panels engage each other and draw the viewer into the drama].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 141, 1151 (February 1999): 107-112. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

65. Record Number: 5567
Author(s): Walters, Lori J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Figures in the Illustrated Manuscripts of "Le conte du Graal" and its "Continuations": Ladies, Saints, Spectators, Mediators [the author argues that the authors, illuminators, scribes, and others who contributed to the text displayed differing interpretations of female characters depending in large part whether the story was considered a romance, a hagiography, or a combination of the two].
Source: Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester , 81., 3 (Autumn 1999):  Pages 7 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1999.

66. Record Number: 5350
Author(s): Pentcheva, Bissera V.
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Image of the Virgin in Eleventh- and Twelfth-Century Constantinople [a new image of the Virgin appeared on coins in the mid-eleventh century; she appears with her hands raised in prayer and on her chest there is a medallion depicting the blessing Christ Child; the image is sometimes called the Virgin "Episkepsis" (Visitation and Protection), although several other types ("Blanchernitissa," "Panagiotissa," "Playtera," and "Znamenie") are also associated with this iconographic representation].
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 25., ( 1999):  Pages 34
Year of Publication: 1999.

67. Record Number: 5697
Author(s): Bennett, Adelaide.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman's Power of Prayer Versus the Devil in a Book of Hours, of ca. 1300 [The author argues that the manuscript is highly personalized with an emphasis on the female owner's need to repent, fight sin, and oppose the devil; even in the hours of the Virgin the initials depict worldly pleasures to be avoided].
Source: Image and Belief: Studies in Celebration of the Eightieth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 1999. Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 25., ( 1999):  Pages 89 - 108.
Year of Publication: 1999.

68. Record Number: 3954
Author(s): Gifford, E. Melanie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Van Eyck's Washington "Annunciation" : Technical Evidence for Iconographic Development
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 81,1 (March 1999): 108-116. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

69. Record Number: 4021
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Imagery of the Magdalen in Christina of Markyate's Psalter (St. Albans Psalter)
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 38, 1 (1999): 67-80. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

70. Record Number: 5030
Author(s): Clifton, James,
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Shame in Masaccio's "Expulsion from the Garden of Eden" ["Here both gestures - Eve in covering her erogenous zones, Adam in leaving his exposed and in covering only his face - suggest that, in conformity with Italian mores, it is only the woman's sexuality that is at issue and that the sin associated with her sexuality dishonours the man. Adam's exposure does not dishonour him; rather it serves to draw the insistent distinction between men and women, fundamental to the honour-shame paradigm, which is manifested most recognizably in anatomy." (Page 650)].
Source: Art History , 22., 5 (December 1999):  Pages 637 - 655.
Year of Publication: 1999.

71. Record Number: 3955
Author(s): Purtle, Carol J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Van Eyck's Washington "Annunciation" : Narrative Time and Metaphoric Tradition
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 81,1 (March 1999): 117-125. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

72. Record Number: 11863
Author(s): Morgan, Nigel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Texts and Images of Marian Devotion in English Twelfth-Century Monasticism and Their Influence on the Secular Church [The author briefly discusses surviving evidence, mostly from male Benedictine houses, which involves both devotional and theological material including liturgy, prayers, miracles, exempla, and controversial works, particularly concerning the Conception of the Virgin. Imags of Mary rely on intellectual and theological symbolism rather than on the humanized and affective portrayals that became popular in the thirteenth century. Common motifs include the Virgin as Ecclesia, Wisdom, Bride of Christ, and a crowned queen. Both images and texts were transmitted to the secular world. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Monasteries and society in medieval Britain: proceedings of the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by Benjamin Thompson Harlaxton medieval studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1999.  Pages 117 - 136.
Year of Publication: 1999.

73. Record Number: 2920
Author(s): Krüger, Annette and Gabriele Runge
Contributor(s):
Title : Lifting the Veil: Two Typological Diagrams in the "Hortus Deliciarum" [on folios 67r and v there are two circular diagrams that juxtapose Moses and Old Testament scenes with Jesus].
Source: Journal of the Warburg and Courtauld Institutes (Full Text via JSTOR) 60 (1997): 1-22. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

74. Record Number: 5957
Author(s): Jacobus, Laura.
Contributor(s):
Title : Piety and Propriety in the Arena Chapel [the author argues that the "Early Life of the Virgin" frescoes in the Arena Chapel were intended in part to convey models of behavior to the wife, mother, and daughter of Enrico Scrovegni, the patron; using devotional works and secular conduct literature the author argues that the ideals for upper class women's behavior (modesty, chastity, courtliness, humility, charity, and attention to their husbands and families) were linked to piety and represented by Giotto in the images of the Virgin and other holy women].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 12., 2 (June 1998):  Pages 177 - 205.
Year of Publication: 1998.

75. Record Number: 8522
Author(s): Vroom, Theresia de.
Contributor(s):
Title : In the Context of "Rough Music": The Representation of Unequal Couples in Some Medieval Plays [The author discusses the custom of "charivari" in which the community shamed and mocked inappropriate couples (including age disparity, adultery, and such violations of gender norms as shrewish wives and henpecked husbands). Vroom offers some examples fr
Source: European Medieval Drama , 2., ( 1998):  Pages 237 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1998.

76. Record Number: 6503
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medici-Tornabuoni "Desco da Parto" in Context [the author argues that the large and elaborately painted birth tray now in the Metropolitan Museum was given by Piero de Medici to his wife Lucrezia Tornabuoni on the birth of their son, Lorenzo de Medici; the author explores the production and use of birth trays in the celebration of childbirth in post-plague Italy].
Source: Metropolitan Museum Journal , 33., ( 1998):  Pages 137 - 151.
Year of Publication: 1998.

77. Record Number: 3147
Author(s): Caviness, Madeline H.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Contemplative Life in Washington
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 37, 2 (1998): 150-157. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

78. Record Number: 4352
Author(s): Williamson, Beth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin "Lactans" as Second Eve: Image of the "Salvatrix" [the author analyzes the iconography of a painting by Carlo da Camerino, depicting the Virgin nursing the infant Christ with Eve reclining below; Margaret Miles had argued that the painting juxtaposes Mary's goodness with Eve's sinful body (and the bodies of the female viewers); the author argues that the panel creates a "complex allegory not only of the Virgin's centrality to human redemption but also of Eve's crucial role in this process"].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 19., ( 1998):  Pages 105 - 138.
Year of Publication: 1998.

79. Record Number: 3141
Author(s): Spreadbury, Jo.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Gender of the Church: The Female Image of"Ecclesia" in the Middle Ages [explores the tensions between the female "Ecclesia" holding a chalice and women who were forbidden the priesthood and limited in their access to the sacrament].
Source: Gender and Christian religion: papers read at the 1996 Summer Meeting and the 1997 Winter Meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society.   Edited by R. N. Swanson Studies in Church History, 34.  1998. Studies in Iconography , 19., ( 1998):  Pages 93 - 103.
Year of Publication: 1998.

80. Record Number: 4353
Author(s): Paxson, James J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Nether-Faced Devil and the Allegory of Parturition [The author argues that the representation of the devil with a face in place of its genitals draws on the allegory of childbirth and thereby demonizes the female sexual body].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 19., ( 1998):  Pages 139 - 176.
Year of Publication: 1998.

81. Record Number: 5564
Author(s): Manion, Margaret M.
Contributor(s):
Title : An Unusual Image of the Assumption in a Fourteenth-Century Dominican Choir-Book [within the initial the Virgin sits beside Christ, leaning on his shoulder and holding his hand; the author argues that the close, tender relationship depicted draws upon the "Song of Songs"; this image of the Assumption was soon displaced by the majestic
Source: The Art of the Book: Its Place in Medieval Worship.   Edited by Margaret M. Manion and Bernard J. Muir .   University of Exeter Press, 1998. Studies in Iconography , 19., ( 1998):  Pages 153 - 161.
Year of Publication: 1998.

82. Record Number: 1591
Author(s): Armstead, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Interpreting Images of Women with Books in Misericords [some represent piety, while others mock women's pretensions].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 130., 1544 (septembre 1997):  Pages 57 - 74.
Year of Publication: 1997.

83. Record Number: 1599
Author(s): Lewis, Flora.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wound in Christ's Side and the Instruments of the Passion: Gendered Experience and Response [images of sexual union and childbirth as well as knightly combat were used by both women and men to contemplate the Passion].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 130., 1544 (septembre 1997):  Pages 204 - 229.
Year of Publication: 1997.

84. Record Number: 3148
Author(s): Kalas, Gregor.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queening Intercession: The Virgin Intervenes as an Empress at S. Maria Antiqua (Rome)
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 23., ( 1997):  Pages 10
Year of Publication: 1997.

85. Record Number: 5893
Author(s): Wright, Alison.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pollaiuolo's "Elevation of the Magdalen" Altar-piece and an Early Patron [the author traces the patronage of Pollaiuolo's painting to a Florentine notary in Staggia; she believes that the iconography of the penitential Magdalene receiving the Eucharist may have been requested by the patron; the Appendix transcribes three pertinent texts: the will of the patron, the patron's 1469 tax return, and the petition from Bruno di Ser Benedetto Grazzini (possibly the patron's son) for the redemption of his deceased wife's dowry (the wife Maddalena was the daughter of the painter Antonio del Pollaiuolo)].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1132 (July 1997): 444-451. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

86. Record Number: 2892
Author(s): Stroll, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maria "Regina":"Papal Symbol
Source: Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe: Proceedings of a Conference Held at King's College London, April 1995.   Edited by Anne J. Duggan .   Boydell Press, 1997.  Pages 173 - 203.
Year of Publication: 1997.

87. Record Number: 1597
Author(s): Stanton, Anne Rudloff.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Eve to Bathsheba and Beyond: Motherhood in the Queen Mary Psalter [discussion of the many strong mothers portrayed in the manuscript ; in the Old Testament preface there are illustrations of Eve, Sarah, Hagar, Rebecca, Rachel, Hannah, and Bathsheba; in the New Testament illustrations of the Psalms there are illustrations of the Virgin Mary and the mothers of such saints as Thomas Becket and Nicholas of Myra].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997.  Pages 172 - 189.
Year of Publication: 1997.

88. Record Number: 4349
Author(s): Even, Yael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Daphne (Without Apollo) Reconsidered: Some Disregarded Images of Sexual Pursuit in Italian Renaissance and Baroque Art
Source: Studies in Iconography , 18., ( 1997):  Pages 143 - 159.
Year of Publication: 1997.

89. Record Number: 1869
Author(s): Muir Wright, Rosemary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Great Whore in the Illustrated Apocalypse Cycles [traces the development of the image of the Whore of Babylon and discusses the impact that aristocratic female readers had on her representation in manuscripts both as the sovereign lady and as the evil other].
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 23., 3 (September 1997):  Pages 191 - 210.
Year of Publication: 1997.

90. Record Number: 2572
Author(s): Gourlay, Kristina E.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Dame à la Licorne: A Reinterpretation [argues that the tapestry series does not represent an allegory of the five senses but rather a romance between the maiden and the unicorn in order to celebrate or commemorate a marriage in the Le Viste family].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 130., 1544 (septembre 1997):  Pages 47 - 72.
Year of Publication: 1997.

91. Record Number: 754
Author(s): Frugoni, Chiara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Mystics, Visions, and Iconography [mystics' uses of images and their affective relationship with a more humanized deity].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval and Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Daniel Bornstein and Roberto Rusconi. Trans. by Margery J. Schneider .   University of Chicago Press, 1996. Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):  Pages 130 - 164. Originally published as "Le mistiche, le visioni e l'iconografia: rapporti ed influssi'" in Mistiche e devote nell'Italia tardomedievale. Edited by Daniel Bornstein and Roberto Rusconi (Liguori Editore, 1992). Pages 127-155.
Year of Publication: 1996.

92. Record Number: 769
Author(s): Valdez Del Alamo, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lament for a Lost Queen: The Sarcophagus of Doña Blanca in Nájera
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 78, 2 (June 1996): 311-333. Link Info Later published in Memory and the Medieval Tomb. Edited by Elizabeth Valdez del Alamo with Carol Stamatis Pendergast. Ashgate, 2000. Pages 43-79.
Year of Publication: 1996.

93. Record Number: 1841
Author(s): Boyle, Marjorie O'Rourke.
Contributor(s):
Title : Coquette at the Cross? Magdalen in the Master of the Bartholomew Altar's Deposition at the Louvre [argues that Magdalen's depiction with gloves and ointment jar refers to her compassion not her earlier life as a courtesan ; the painting may have hung in the Antonite hospital in Paris and had special meaning for the patients, particularly those suffering from St. Anthony's Fire who would have had limbs amputated].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 59., 4 ( 1996):  Pages 573 - 577.
Year of Publication: 1996.

94. Record Number: 2380
Author(s): Hooper, Bari.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Medieval Depiction of Infant-Feeding in Winchester Cathedral [misericord depicts an infant drinking from a cow's horn].
Source: Medieval Archaeology , 40., ( 1996):  Pages 230 - 233.
Year of Publication: 1996.

95. Record Number: 2543
Author(s): Martin, Nell Gifford.
Contributor(s):
Title : Vision and Violence in Some Gothic Meditative Imagery [analyzes manuscript images of ritual sacrifice (Jephthah's daughter and Abraham's offering of Isaac) and Christ's crucifixion for meanings conveyed by gender].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 17., ( 1996):  Pages 311 - 348.
Year of Publication: 1996.

96. Record Number: 2541
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ploratus et Ululatus: The Mothers in the Massacre of the Innocents at Chartres Cathedral [argues that female viewers of the Frieze cared about the welfare of their children, saw the Virgin at Chartres as a protector of children, and recognized mourning as a particularly female responsibility ; also surveys twelfth-century representations of the Massacre in manuscript illuminations and sculpture].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 17., ( 1996):  Pages 95 - 141.
Year of Publication: 1996.

97. Record Number: 1360
Author(s): Bennett, Adelaide.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Thirteenth-Century French Book of Hours for Marie [Marie, a laywoman, is named in one of the prayers; the manuscript is significant for its numerous and varied representations of women. Sixteen out of twenty-one historiated initials portray laywomen in religious devotion or in family scenes].
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , 54., ( 1996):  Pages 21 - 37.
Year of Publication: 1996.

98. Record Number: 1097
Author(s): Betcher, Gloria J.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Tempting Theory: What Early Cornish Mermaid Images Reveal about the First Doctor's Analogy in "Passio Domini" [traditional representation of mermaids as temptresses in Cornish church bench-ends and wall paintings is reconciled with the play's use of the mermaid to symbolize the dual nature of Jesus Christ].
Source: Early Drama, Art, and Music Review , 18., 2 (Spring 1996):  Pages 65 - 76.
Year of Publication: 1996.

99. Record Number: 6312
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Mater et sponsa: Einige Bemerkungen zur Kunst der Zisterzienser in Böhmen
Source: Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 47., ( 1996):  Pages 313 - 327.
Year of Publication: 1996.

100. Record Number: 2345
Author(s): Owen-Crocker, Gale R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pomp, Piety, and Keeping the Woman in Her Place: The Dress of Cnut and Emma in BL MS Stowe 944
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

101. Record Number: 230
Author(s): Long, Jane C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Salvation Through Meditation: The Tomb Frescoes in the Holy Confessors Chapel at Santa Croce in Florence [one prominently portrays a female donor]
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 1 (1995): 77-88. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

102. Record Number: 1547
Author(s): Walter, Christopher.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Portrait of Saint Paraskeve [manuscript illuminations, wall paintings, and icons represent various saints with the name Paraskeve (of Epibata, of Iconium, the Roman, etc.)].
Source: Byzantinoslavica , 56., 3 ( 1995):  Pages 753 - 757.
Year of Publication: 1995.

103. Record Number: 1608
Author(s): Kottenhoff, Margarete.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Miniaturen des "Livre de la Cité des Dames" als historiche Quellen
Source: Historisches Jahrbuch , 115., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 335 - 361.
Year of Publication: 1995.

104. Record Number: 1612
Author(s): Fabrié, Marie- Luce.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images de la femme dans les consoles sculptées de la fin du gothique en Languedoc Oriental
Source: La Femme dans l' histoire et la société méridionales (IXe-XIXe S.): Actes du 66e congrés. .   Fédération historique du Languedoc méditerranéen et du Roussillon, 1995. Historisches Jahrbuch , 115., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 243 - 254.
Year of Publication: 1995.

105. Record Number: 1987
Author(s): Mango, Marlia Mundell.
Contributor(s):
Title : Artemis at Daphne [mythological hunting motifs on brass buckets and a mosaic pavement at Daphne near Antioch are analyzed].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 263 Issue title: Bosphorus: Essays in the Honour of Cyril Mango. Ed. by Stephanos Efthymiadis, Claudia Rapp, and Dimitris Tsougarakis.
Year of Publication: 1995.

106. Record Number: 2722
Author(s): Jensen, Robin M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Femininity of Christ in Early Christian Iconography [suggests that feminine attributes of Jesus, including long, curly hair, smooth, beardless cheeks, and small, protruding breasts, were borrowed from savior deities of the mystery cults, especially Dionysus and Orpheus].
Source: Studia Patristica , 29., ( 1995):  Pages 269 - 282. Papers Presented at the Twelfth International Conference on Patristic Studies Held in Oxford. Historia, Theologica et Philosophica, Critica et Philologica
Year of Publication: 1995.

107. Record Number: 2768
Author(s): Thümmel, Hans Georg.
Contributor(s):
Title : Muttergottesikonen und Mariengnadenbilder
Source: Byzantinoslavica , 56., 3 ( 1995):  Pages 759
Year of Publication: 1995.

108. Record Number: 5558
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Noces feintes: sur quelques lectures de deux thèmes iconographiques dans les "cassoni" florentins [The author analyzes the scenes painted on a wedding cassone, formerly from the Rose Art Museum; scholars had believed that the scenes illustrated the story of lovers who reconciled their warring families from the "Istorietta Amorosa," but the author argu
Source: I Tatti Studies: Essays in the Renaissance , 6., ( 1995):  Pages 11 - 30.
Year of Publication: 1995.

109. Record Number: 15
Author(s): Henderson, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Miraculous Childbirth and the Portinari Altarpiece
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 77, 2 (June 1995): 249-261. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

110. Record Number: 233
Author(s): Karkov, Catherine E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Unspun Heroes: Iconography of the Spinning Woman in the Middle Ages
Source: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 25., 2 (Spring 1995):  Pages 159
Year of Publication: 1995.

111. Record Number: 150
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Case of the Beata Simona: Iconography, Hagiography, and Misogyny in Three Paintings by Taddeo di Bartolo
Source: Art History , 18., 2 (June 1995):  Pages 154 - 184.
Year of Publication: 1995.

112. Record Number: 340
Author(s): Vasvari, Louise O
Contributor(s):
Title : Joseph on the Margin: The Mérode Tryptic and Medieval Spectacle [Joseph as Cuckold in paintings and in mystery plays]
Source: Mediaevalia , 18., ( 1995):  Pages 163 - 189. (1995 (for 1992)) Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1995.

113. Record Number: 238
Author(s): Harf-Lancner, Laurence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Serpente et le sanglier. Les manuscrits enluminés des deux romans français de "Mélusine"
Source: Moyen Age , 101., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 65 - 87.
Year of Publication: 1995.

114. Record Number: 229
Author(s): Campbell, C. Jean.
Contributor(s):
Title : Courting, Harlotry, and the Art of Gothic Ivory Carving
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 1 (1995): 11-19. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

115. Record Number: 187
Author(s): Hunt, Lucy-Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fine Incense of Virginity: A Late Twelfth Century Wallpainting of the Annuciation at the Monastery of the Syrians, Egypt
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 19., ( 1995):  Pages 182 - 232.
Year of Publication: 1995.

116. Record Number: 231
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bride Stripped Bare: A Rare Type of the Disrobing of Christ
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 2 (1995): 126-146. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

117. Record Number: 149
Author(s): Sekules, Veronica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beauty and the Beast: Ridicule and Orthodoxy in Architectural Marginalia in Early Fourteenth-Century Lincolnshire [sculpted corbels, several of women representing various sins].
Source: Art History , 18., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 37 - 62.
Year of Publication: 1995.

118. Record Number: 2447
Author(s): Ousterhout, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin of the Chora: An Image and Its Contexts [discussion of the mosaic icon of the Virgin in the church of the Chora Monastery in terms of its part in a decorative program that called upon a complex symbolism; also discusses the importance of the Virgin "orans" motif in the related images known as "Blachernitissa," "Episkepsis," and "Platytera"].
Source: The Sacred Image East and West.   Edited by Robert Ousterhout and Leslie Brubaker .   Illinois Byzantine Studies IV. University of Illinois Press, 1995. Art History , 18., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 91 - 109.
Year of Publication: 1995.

119. Record Number: 488
Author(s): Hawkes, A. Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : An Iconography of Female "Humilitas": The Wirksworth Slab and Its Audience [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 53].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

120. Record Number: 428
Author(s): Mulder- Bakker, Anneke B.
Contributor(s): Madou, Mireille, in collaboration with
Title : Introduction [sections on iconography, the "Acta Sanctorum," models of female sanctity, and the cultural force of the laity].
Source: Sanctity and Motherhood: Essays on Holy Mothers in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Anneke B. Mulder-Bakker Garland Medieval Casebooks, 14.   Garland Publishing, 1995. Studies in Iconography , 17., ( 1996):  Pages 2 - 30.
Year of Publication: 1995.

121. Record Number: 2694
Author(s): Schiferl, Ellen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Caritas and the Iconography of Italian Confraternity Art [explores the iconography of the Madonna della Misericordia, the Madonna of Humility, and the Flagellation of Christ within the lay context of the confraternity where the themes of charity, humility, and mercy were expressed by love for one's neighbor, love for God, and the hope of salvation; also includes an appendix that lists Italian confraternity art, both sculpture and painting, for each of the three themes, 1300-1515].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 14., ( 1995):  Pages 207 - 246.
Year of Publication: 1995.

122. Record Number: 5577
Author(s): Morgan, Nigel.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Coronation of the Virgin by the Trinity and Other Texts and Images of the Glorification of Mary in Fifteenth-Century England
Source: England in the Fifteenth Century: Proceedings of the 1992 Harlaxton Symposium. .  Harlaxton Medieval Studies , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 223 - 241.
Year of Publication: 1994.

123. Record Number: 9777
Author(s): Miligi, Giuseppe.
Contributor(s):
Title : Il pittore e la clarissa [Eustocha of Messina had ties to the Observant wing of the Franciscan Order. The painter Antonello da Messina lived in Messina at the same time and also had Franciscan ties. Pictures of Eustochia have their own iconography, but some also believe Antonello used her as a model for his Madonnas. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Francescanesimo al femminile: Chiara d'Assisi ed Eustochia da Messina.   Edited by Giuseppe Miligi et al .   EDAS, 1994. Harlaxton Medieval Studies , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 59 - 114.
Year of Publication: 1994.

124. Record Number: 899
Author(s): Cotsonis, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virgin with the "Tongues of Fire" on Byzantine Lead Seals
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 49 (1994): 221-227. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

125. Record Number: 11665
Author(s): Barasch, Frances K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Norwich Cathedral: The Bauchun Chapel Legend of the Accused Queen [Thirty-two sculpted bosses in Bauchun Chapel retell the Virgin's miracle of the queen falsely accused. The author argues that the sculptors drew on a number of different sources including the "Gesta Romanorum," an early Latin miracle of the Virgin, and Gautier de Coinci's retelling of the miracle in verse. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Early Drama, Art, and Music Review , 15., 2 (Spring 1993):  Pages 63 - 75.
Year of Publication: 1993.

126. Record Number: 12728
Author(s): Hull, Vida J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sex of the Savior in Renaissance Art: The Revelations of Saint Bridget and the Nude Christ Child in Renaissance Art [Bridget's description of the nude Christ child at the Nativity, written during the fourteenth century, had a strong influence on fifteenth century visual representations of the Christ child, who was often depicted as naked infant with genitals in open view. The exposure of the Christ child's penis is a moment of revelation that displays His gender and also exemplifies His humanity. This was a common motif in the Brigittine scenes of the Nativity and the Adoration of the Shepherds, but was later transferred into other contexts, such as the Adoration of the Magi and devotional images of the Virgin and Child. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 77 - 112.
Year of Publication: 1993.

127. Record Number: 12729
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Donatello's Bronze 'David': Grillanda, Goliath, Groom? [Art historians have explored many perspectives on Donatello's youthful and androgynous representation of the nude David including psychoanalytic and homoerotic perspectives, but these male centered approaches overlook the possibility of a female audience for the statue. Paintings on contemporary Florentine cassoni (wedding chests), including scenes from the life of David (like his battle with Goliath or his subsequent wedding to a royal bride) or seemingly unrelated depictions of scantily clad males (often painted underneath the lids), establish the possibility of a wedding context for Donatello's sensuous nude. In the context of nuptial imagery, this representation of David might appeal to a prospective bride as well as the narcissistic or homoerotic desire of an imagined male audience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 113 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1993.

128. Record Number: 8734
Author(s): Kornbluth, Genevra A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Susanna Crystal of Lothar II: Chastity, the Church, and Royal Justice [The author considers the iconography of the Susanna Crystal (which illustrates the Old Testament story) and its relation to contemporary Lotharingian politics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 31, 1 (1992): 25-39. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

129. Record Number: 10364
Author(s): Shell, Janice and Grazioso Sironi
Contributor(s):
Title : Cecilia Gallerani: Leonardo’s Lady with an Ermine [The authors identify the sitter for Leonardo’s portrait as Cecilia Gallerani, the mistress of Duke Ludovico Sforza. It is not the lady’s resemblance to other women in other contemporary portraits but the iconography of the painting that identifies her. She holds an ermine (weasel) because Sforza's emblem was the ermine, or because the Greek word for ermine is “gale” (a pun on the lady’s surname). Cecilia may also have been the model for the pointing angel in Leonardo’s “Virgin of the Rocks.” The Appendix transcribes six Latin documents concerning Cecilia. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 13., 25 ( 1992):  Pages 47 - 66.
Year of Publication: 1992.

130. Record Number: 6603
Author(s): Blum, Shirley Neilsen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hans Memling's "Annunciation" with Angelic Attendants [the author argues that Memling's interpretation is unique in his emphasis on Mary and the doctrinal meaning of the moment of the incarnation; the author cites imagery and iconography that convey purity, the nuptial bed, and the blessed womb].
Source: Metropolitan Museum Journal , 27., ( 1992):  Pages 43 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1992.

131. Record Number: 8633
Author(s): Block, Elaine C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Half Angel - Half Beast: Images of Women on Misericords [The author investigates the reasons why carvings of women appear on misericords, and shows how these carvings evoke women's negative associations with abstract vices, beasts, and devils. A comprehensive list of women on misericords appears at the end of the article. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinardus: Yearbook of the International Reynard Society , 5., ( 1992):  Pages 17 - 34.
Year of Publication: 1992.

132. Record Number: 10223
Author(s): Rushing, James A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Iwein as Slave of Woman: the “Maltererteppich” in Freiburg [The story of the Arthurian knight Iwein was known to medieval audiences not only through literary texts but also through pictorial representations, such as an early fourteenth-century tapestry in the Augustinermuseum in Freiburg. This wall-hanging features a series of medallions, two of which depict Iwein’s adventures. The other medallions feature examples of “Frauensklaven” or “Minnesklaven” (men humiliated by their submission to women), including some well-known figures like Samson and Delilah and Aristotle and Phyllis. Although the meaning of the tapestry is unclear, the images remove Iwein from his original function as an exemplary figure and insert him into a new context: a pictorial representation of the “Frauensklaven” topos. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 124 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1992.

133. Record Number: 10225
Author(s): King, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval and Renaissance Matrons, Italian-style [Women were able to commission art and architecture in fourteenth and fifteenth century Italy in a variety of ways, even if their involvement in the production of images and construction of buildings wasn’t as widespread as men’s. For instance, wealthy widows could control the making of large, public images such as funerary altarpieces, while nuns could commission artwork and buildings through convent endowments. Through their acts of patronage, these “matrons” challenged conventional expectations that women inhabit a small, private sphere. The author also analyzes how women chose to represent themselves visually within the works they commissioned. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 372 - 393.
Year of Publication: 1992.

134. Record Number: 10279
Author(s): Ladis, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Immortal Queen and Mortal Bride: the Marian Imagery of Ambrogio Lorenzetti's Cycle at Montesiepi [The author describes the depiction of Mary as both a bride and a queen in one fourteenth-century cycle. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gazette des beaux-arts , 119., (mai-juin 1992):  Pages 189 - 200.
Year of Publication: 1992.

135. Record Number: 10380
Author(s): Blanchard, Joel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Compilation and Legitimation in the Fifteenth Century: "Le Livre de la Cite des Dames" [The author traces the complicated rhetorical processes involved in Christine’s adaptation of her literary sources; compilation is the central organizational principle of the work. The author suggests that we evaluate Christine’s work on the basis of its aesthetic value, and not base our judgments on an analysis of the work’s content. The author concludes by describing how the illustrations in a manuscript of “Le Livre” have an autobiographical function. In addition to depicting Christine herself, the illustrations use images of books and allegorical figures to legitimize Christine as an author. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Gazette des beaux-arts , 119., (mai-juin 1992):  Pages 228 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1992.

136. Record Number: 20784
Author(s): Zalewska, Katarzyna
Contributor(s):
Title : Corona Beatissime Virginis Mariae Das mittelalterliche gemalte Marientraktat aus der Bernhardinerkirche in Breslau [Examines the scenes illustrated in the pictorial medallions of the panel painting, with particular emphasis on their relationship to contemporary Franciscan interpretations of the Coronation of the Virgin. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 51., ( 1992):  Pages 57 - 65.
Year of Publication: 1992.

137. Record Number: 20786
Author(s): Thürlemann, Felix
Contributor(s):
Title : Das Lukas-Tryptichon in Stolzenhain: Ein verlorenes Hauptwerk von Robert Campin in einer Kopie aus der Werkstatt Derick Baegerts [Compares the different versions of the triptych's middle panel and related issues of provenance; also examines Baegerts work with that of Campin (specifically the Merode Triptych). Minute details of the painting-such as the scenic background and use of evangelists' symbols-are used to delineate the work of Baegert from that of his workshop. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 51., ( 1992):  Pages 524 - 564.
Year of Publication: 1992.

138. Record Number: 10272
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The midwife in the Holkham Bible Picture Book [The article suggests that the illuminations of the Nativity in the Holkham Bible Picture Book confuse the figures of St. Anastasia and Salome, the midwife at Mary's birth. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Notes and Queries , 1 (March 1992):  Pages 22 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1992.

139. Record Number: 8690
Author(s): Gilchrist, Roberta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blessed Art Thou Among Women: the Archaeology of Female Piety [The author discusses the orientation, archaeological, and iconographic details of medieval British cloisters and other women’s monastic buildings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman is a Worthy Wight: Women in English Society c. 1200-1500.   Edited by P.J.P. Goldberg .   Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992. Notes and Queries , 1 (March 1992):  Pages 212 - 226.
Year of Publication: 1992.

140. Record Number: 9488
Author(s): Friedman, John B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nicholas's "Angelus ad Virginem" and the mocking of Noah [The author considers the humorous inversion in the “Miller’s Tale” of the Noah and Gabriel Biblical episodes within the context of other, similar kinds of medieval literary and artistic parodies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of English Studies , 22., ( 1992):  Pages 162 - 180.
Year of Publication: 1992.

141. Record Number: 9495
Author(s): French, Katherine L.
Contributor(s):
Title : The legend of Lady Godiva and the image of the female body [The article examines versions of the Lady Godiva legend to determine how the people of Coventry voiced their concerns about issues of social order and disorder. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 18., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 3 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1992.

142. Record Number: 10522
Author(s): Frugoni, Chiara.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Imagined Woman [The author provides an overview of visual representations of women in the medieval Christian West. Women were represented in a variety of art forms (including manuscripts, paintings, frescos, and sculptures). These images of women reflected perceived expectations of their roles (as virgins, wives, or widows) and reinforced Church doctrine on the sexual regulation of women, women’s roles within marriage, and women’s perceived duties within the domestic and religious spheres. The author argues that most of these representations are misogynistic; although women sometimes appear as saints (like the Virgin Mary) they often take the form of sinners and temptresses (like Eve). The author also examines how the visual arts use women as personifications of virtues and vices or other abstract concepts. In addition, the author argues that images provide insights into women’s private and daily lives, as well as the nature of women’s literacy and the variety of their occupations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Journal of Medieval History , 18., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 336 - 422.
Year of Publication: 1992.

143. Record Number: 10734
Author(s): Bynum, Caroline Walker.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Body of Christ in the Later Middle Ages: A Reply to Leo Steinberg [The author argues against Steinberg’s notion that Renaissance painters focused on Christ’s penis in order to make a theological statement about sexuality; she suggests instead that fifteenth-century artists show Jesus as both male and female, and saw his as a generative body. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Human Body in Medieval Religion. Caroline Walker Bynum .   MIT Press, 1991. Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 79 - 118.
Year of Publication: 1991.

144. Record Number: 11069
Author(s): Camille, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gothic Signs and the Surplus: The Kiss on the Cathedral [The kiss was a sign with many meanings, and its symbolic significance in medieval visual and verbal representations is manifold. A sculpture on the West Front of Amiens Cathedral depicts the sin of lechery through the image of a man and woman kissing, yet the kiss did not always stand in for representations of sexual intercourse (legitimate or illicit). The kiss could have spiritual and allegorical significance (e.g., visual representations of the Song of Songs), legal force (e.g., feudal and courtly rituals), treacherous or transgressive overtones (e.g., representations of Judas and Christ or other same-sex couples kissing), mystical meanings, or devotional purposes (e.g., the kiss of peace). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 151-170. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

145. Record Number: 11217
Author(s): Twomey, Michael W.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christ’s Leap and Mary’s Clean Catch in “Piers Plowman” B.12.136-44a and C.14.81-88a [In his allegorical poem, William Langland combines conventional images of Christ and Mary in order to represent how Christ’s love and Mary’s purity played a key role in the foundation of the Church. The poet achieves this effect through poetic devices, including allusion and metaphor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 5., ( 1991):  Pages 165 - 174.
Year of Publication: 1991.

146. Record Number: 10993
Author(s): Morgan, Nigel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Texts and Images of Marian Devotion in Thirteenth-Century England [Many lay practices focused on the Virgin Mary developed in the thirteenth century. They required a basic knowledge of Latin to read books of hours. Many of the most popular ideas, such as Mary the intercessor, were found in art. Much of thirteenth century Marian art from England has been lost; but illuminated manuscripts employ the most common motifs, including Mary pleading bare-breasted for sinful humanity. The Appendix presents Middle English language texts of Marian antiphons, hymns, and prayers of the Sarum Hours from an early fifteenth century manuscript of "The Prymer or Lay Folks' Prayer Book." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: England in the Thirteenth Century: Proceedings of the 1989 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by W.M. Ormrod Harlaxton Medieval Studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1991. Yearbook of Langland Studies , 5., ( 1991):  Pages 69 - 103.
Year of Publication: 1991.

147. Record Number: 11225
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Relic, Some Pictures and the Mothers of Florence in the Late Fourteenth Century
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 30, 2 (1991): 91-99. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

148. Record Number: 10893
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Marian Politics in Quattrocento Florence: The Renewed Dedication of Santa Maria del Fiore in 1412 [The author argues that the political leaders of Florence chose in 1412 to identify the state with the Virgin Mary in the rededication of the cathedral to "Santa Maria del Fiore." The lily symbolized not only Mary's purity but also the city of Florence. M
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 44., 4 (Winter 1991):  Pages 673 - 719.
Year of Publication: 1991.

149. Record Number: 10891
Author(s): Hunt, Lucy-Anne
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman’s Prayer to Saint Sergios in Latin Syria: Interpreting a Thirteenth-century Icon at Mount Sinai [The icons at Saint Catherine’s Monastery at Mount Sinai include one depicting a black-veiled woman keeling in prayer before an equestrian Saint Sergios. The symbolic significance of the woman’s black veil is unknown, but the painting may indicate the imp
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 15., ( 1991):  Pages 96 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1991.

150. Record Number: 11216
Author(s): Cooper, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Personification in "Piers Plowman" [Although most allegorical writings associate personifications with femininity (abstract nouns often being grammatically feminine in Latin and Romance languages), Langland’s Middle English poem genders personifications based on what attribute they are intended to represent, sometimes representing them as male and sometimes as female. The Seven Deadly Sins, for instance, are not personified as abstract concepts but are exemplified in the behavior of representative individuals (both men and women). Rather than seeing various figures in the poem as allegorical, medieval rhetoricians would claim they are metonyms (parts or attributes representing the larger whole). Thus male figures in the poem can be read as representing particular aspects of the (male) poet’s self. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 5., ( 1991):  Pages 31 - 48.
Year of Publication: 1991.

151. Record Number: 11818
Author(s): Cassell, Anthony K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Santa Lucia as Patroness of Sight: Hagiography, Iconography, and Dante [The role of Saint Lucy in Dante's Divine Comedy is manifold, as the saint bears multiple symbolic and allegorical meanings in the poem. Early accounts of her life present the saint as an exemplum of fortitude, but later narratives depict her as a beautiful virgin martyr whose eyes were plucked out. Representations of Saint Lucy in art often feature her holding her eyes on a dish or platter, highlighting her role as the patroness of sight. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 71 - 88.
Year of Publication: 1991.

152. Record Number: 10730
Author(s): Lindley, Phillip.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sculptural Memorials of Queen Eleanor and their Context [The author shows that the vertical, multiplied images of Eleanor on her memorials and tomb effigies in effect elide secular and ecclesiastical iconography, and make her appear saintly. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 69 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1991.

153. Record Number: 12682
Author(s): Corrie, Rebecca W.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Political Meaning of Coppo di Marcovaldo's Madonna and Child in Siena
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 1 (1990): 61-75. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

154. Record Number: 12681
Author(s): Blum, Pamela Z.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Statue-Column of a Queen from Saint-Thibaut, Provins, in the Glencairn Museum
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 2 (1990): 214-233. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

155. Record Number: 12699
Author(s): Brown, David Alan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Leonardo and the Ladies with the Ermine and the Book [Although Isabella d'Este and Cecilia Gallerani were both active, fashionable, and learned patrons of letters, Leonardo da Vinci (who was patronized by both) depicts the women very differently in his paintings. Cecilia appears in Leonardo's "Lady with the Ermine" as a lively woman whose gaze faces the viewer, but Isabella d'Este appears in Leonardo's drawings as more stately and reserved, sometimes pointing at a book. Isabella likely played a large role in shaping her own image in her portraits, preferring more formal and Classical motifs including the profile pose. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 11., 21 ( 1990):  Pages 47 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1990.

156. Record Number: 12736
Author(s): Takacs, Sarolta A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Manuel Philes’ Meditation on an Icon of the Virgin Mary [This devotional poem by the fourteenth century Greek poet represents a progression from a meditation of a concrete object (an icon of the Virgin Mary) to a mystical or metaphysical plane of understanding. The author gives a line by line analysis of the language of the poem, which employs numerous rhetorical devices to connect allusions to the burning bush (which typographically prefigures the Virgin Mary) to imagery of divine fire. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 15., ( 1990):  Pages 277 - 288.
Year of Publication: 1990.

157. Record Number: 12744
Author(s): Balas, Edith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cybele and Her Cult in Andrea Mantegna's "The Triumph of Caesar" [English adaptation of French abstract: The article explains in detail the presence, never before noted, of the pagan goddess Cybele in the series of paintings by Mantegna, "The Triumph of Caesar." Mantegna draws upon Classical and early medieval art and literature in order to present Cybele in different roles: political, military, and religious. The author analyzes Cybele in relation to her cult, suggesting that, during the time of Julius Caesar, she became a national goddess. She was carried along from Gaul by the army for protection, and was brought into Rome in triumph as a spoil of war. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 115., (January 1990):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1990.

158. Record Number: 12754
Author(s): Lewis, Suzanne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Apocalypse of Isabella of France: Paris, Bibl. Nat. MS Fr. 13096. The Appendix outlines the picture cycle and text of the manuscript, listing the text (by chapter and verse number) and subject matter of images on each folio [Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):  Pages 224 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1990.

159. Record Number: 12755
Author(s): Leveto, Paula D.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Marian Theme of the Frescoes in Santa Maria at Castelseprio
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 391 - 413.
Year of Publication: 1990.

160. Record Number: 12756
Author(s): Carrasco, Magdalena Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spirituality in Context: The Romanesque Illustrated Life of Saint Radegund of Poitiers (Poitiers, Bibliotheque Municipale, MS 250)
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 414 - 435.
Year of Publication: 1990.

161. Record Number: 12802
Author(s): Enright, Michael J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Goddess Who Weaves: Some Iconographic Aspects of Bracteates of the Fürstenberg Type [The author identifies a possible Nordic weaving goddess on a bracteate, and suggests that further study in this area may allow scholars to perceive continuities between German paganism and the High Middle Ages. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 24., ( 1990):  Pages 54 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1990.

162. Record Number: 12692
Author(s): Kaske, R. E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Amnon and Thamar on a Misericord in a Hereford Cathedral [Although the majority of misericords appear to depict secular scenes, one misericord in the Hereford Cathedral may in fact depict a Biblical scene: the episode of Amnon and Thamar (here, Amnon makes advances toward his half-sister Thamar just before he rapes her). Rather than being too unsuitable or obscure for an appearance on a misericord, this episode of rape and incest was well known and often moralized by medieval commentators. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 1 - 10.
Year of Publication: 1990.

163. Record Number: 12734
Author(s): Barber, Charles.
Contributor(s):
Title : The imperial panels at San Vitale: a reconsideration [Two sixth century mosaics in the aspe of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy, depict the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I (on the left) and his wife Theodora (on the right). Although the Emperor and Empress appear to be represented identically (with purple clothing, haloes, and similar postures), other types of iconography in the panels differentiate the role and status of the figures according to their gender. The Emperor, flanked by priests and soldiers, carries objects that indicate his priestly and military roles. The Empress, dressed in more lavish clothing and jewels and enclosed in a depiction of architectural space, reflects Byzantine society’s legal and social relegation of women (even aristocratic ones) to the domestic sphere. Nonetheless, Theodora’s position in image (in the center with males on one side of her, females, on the other) places her at the boundary between the sexes, as a transgressive figure who straddles both public and private spheres. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 14., ( 1990):  Pages 19 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1990.

164. Record Number: 12766
Author(s): Kalavrezou, Ioli Despina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of the Mother: When the Virgin Mary Became Meter Theou [The author discusses the ways in which Mary’s motherhood became an increasingly important feature of Byzantine hagiography and iconography. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers , 44., ( 1990):  Pages 165 - 172.
Year of Publication: 1990.

165. Record Number: 12700
Author(s): Fabianski, Marcin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Federigo da Montefeltro's "Studiolo" in Gubbio Reconsidered. Its Decoration and Its Iconographic Program: An Interpretation [The series of painted panels in a duke's study, attributed to fifteenth century painter Joos van Gent (also known as Justus of Ghent or Giusto da Guanto), depict men kneeling before female personifications of the Liberal Arts. Although the exact attribution, purpose, or arrangement of the panels is unknown, the author suggests a team of artists was instructed to follow a program of iconography of the Arts and Virtues, with revisions to the program (including the inclusion of a duke's likeness and an oration scene) made at the request of the patron. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 11., 22 ( 1990):  Pages 199 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1990.

166. Record Number: 12680
Author(s): Valdez Del Alamo, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Triumphal Visions and Monastic Devotion: The Annunciation Relief of Santo Domingo de Silos
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 2 (1990): 167-188. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

167. Record Number: 15595
Author(s): Bedos, Rezak, Brigitte
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Women in French Sigillographic Sources [The author analyzes surviving seals used to authenticate the owners' agreements on charters and other documents. The iconography falls into three categories: 1) Images on women's Seals, 2) Female representations on women's seals, 3) Female representations on other seals. The article was later republished in Form and Order in Medieval France: Studies in Social and Quantitative Sigillography. By Brigitte Bedos-Rezak. Variorum, 1993. Article 10. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History.   Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal .   University of Georgia Press, 1990.  Pages 1 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1990.

168. Record Number: 12745
Author(s): Harbison, Craig.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexuality and Social Standing in Jan van Eyck's Arnolfini Double Portrait [The painting of Giovanni Arnolfini and his wife Giovanna Cenami depict the couple holding hands while standing in the bedroom, but the rest of the iconography and inscriptions throughout the image do not necessarily suggest that the double portrait is the visual equivalent of a marriage certificate or contract. The visual representation of husband and wife (including gestures and iconography) is instead a more generalized image of marriage that reflects the importance of fertility and defined sexual roles for men and women. Furthermore, the artist's detailed depiction of domestic space projects the social status, courtly aspirations, and religious values of the merchant class Arnolfini couple. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 43., 2 (Summer 1990):  Pages 249 - 291.
Year of Publication: 1990.

169. Record Number: 12747
Author(s): Emison, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Word Made Naked in Pollaiuolo's "Battle of the Nudes" [It is unknown whether Antonio Pollaiuolo's late fifteenth century engraving of nude men engaged in battle refers to a text or not. While previous depictions of nude males (such as figures of David) often relied upon an explicit or implicit textual reference and depicted the youthful male as the ideal of masculine beauty, Pollaiulo's engraving does not clearly invoke any text and offers a virile, adult ideal for the male nude. Interpretations of the engraving have varied, as some of the items throughout the image (such as weapons and chains) could have allegorical significance if they are interpreted as iconography. The author suggests that works of art produced during Pollaiuolo's time that feature nudes, which some have tried to interpret as depicting certain classical myths, epics, or moments in history, may communicate as images without reference to any text. Artists may produce works of art for purely formal or aesthetic reasons with no subject or text in mind. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Art History , 13., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 261 - 275.
Year of Publication: 1990.

170. Record Number: 12746
Author(s): Bergman, Robert P.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Earliest Eleousa: A Coptic Ivory in the Walters Gallery [The author sets the date of the ivory Virgin and Child between the late sixth and early seventh century, and the iconography of the sculpture (which resembles other ivories carved in a similar style) confirms its attribution to an early Christian Egyptian workshop. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , 48., ( 1990):  Pages 37 - 56.
Year of Publication: 1990.

171. Record Number: 2986
Author(s): Holbert, Kelly.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Vindication of a Controversial Early Thirteenth-Century "Vierge Ouvrante" in the Walters Art Gallery
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , ( ):  Pages 101 - 121.
Year of Publication:

172. Record Number: 30914
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Arnolfini Portrait
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , ( ):
Year of Publication:

173. Record Number: 36960
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Heraldic sirens on a capital
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , ( ):
Year of Publication:

174. Record Number: 37259
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Joseph, from the Merode Altarpiece
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , ( ):
Year of Publication:

175. Record Number: 1507
Author(s): Even, Yael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Andrea del Castagno's "Eve": Female Heroes as Anomalies in Italian Renaissance Art
Source: Woman's Art Journal (Full Text via JSTOR) 14, 2 (Fall 1993/Winter 1994): 37-42. Link Info
Year of Publication: