Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


  • Record Number: 3055
  • Author(s)/Creator(s): Hayum , Andrée
  • Contributor(s):
  • Title: A Renaissance Audience Considered: The Nuns at S. Apollonia and Castagno's "Last Supper" [The author explores the possible meanings of the Castagno fresco for the nuns who commissioned the work for their refectory in the monastery of Santa Apollonia in Florence. Hayum notes Castagno's dramatic effects in the scale of figures and the spatial illusion. This kind of immediacy fits with the numerous decoration in the monastery representing nuns recieving blessings from Saint Apollonia and praying before Christ on the crucifix. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
  • Source: Art Bulletin 88, 2 ( 2006): Pages 243 - 266.
  • Description:
  • Article Type: Journal Article
  • Subject (See Also): Andrea del Castagno, Painter- Last Supper Art History- Painting Devotional Art Florence- Monastery of Santa Apollonia, a Women's Benedictine House - Refectory Hall Painting Iconography Monasticism Patronage, Artistic Refectories Women in Religion
  • Geographic Area: Italy
  • Century: 15
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  • Illustrations: Twenty-six illustrations. Figure One Taddeo Gaddi, "Last Supper with Tree of Life and Other Scenes," circa 1350 (Florence, S. Croce, refectory, fresco). Figure Two Andrea del Castagno, "Last Supper," circa 1447 (Florence, S. Apollonia, former refectory, fresco). Figure Three Castagno, "Pippo Spano," circa 1448 (Florence, Galleria degli Uffizi, fresco). Figure Four Castagno, "Queen Tomyris," circa 1448 (Florence, Galleria degli Uffizi, fresco). Figure Five Neri di Bicci, "Sacra Conversazione," 1472 (Florence, S. Apollonia). Figure Six Frontispiece representing Saint Apollonia, "Regula del Sanctissimo Benedetto Patre nostro," Venice 1529. Figure Seven Filippino Lippi, "Saints Benedict and Apollonia," circa 1483, tempera glazed with oil on panel (Pasadena, Norton Simon Foundation). Figure Eight View of frescoes in the S. Apollonia refectory by Andrea del Castagno ("Last Supper") and by Paolo Schiavo ("Resurrection, Crucifixion, and Entombment") circa 1447 (Florence, S. Apollonia, former refectory, fresco). Figure Nine Castagno, "Last Supper," detail of center, circa 1447 (Florence, S. Apollonia, former refectory, fresco). Figure Ten Castagno, "Last Supper," detail of left side with Saints Matthew and Philip, circa 1447 (Florence, S. Apollonia, former refectory, fresco). Figure 11 Castagno, "Last Supper," detail of right side with Saints Simon and James the Less, circa 1447 (Florence, S. Apollonia, former refectory, fresco). Figure 12 Castagno, "Last Supper," detail of left side with Saints Thomas and James the Greater, circa 1447 (Florence, S. Apollonia, former refectory, fresco). Figure 13 Castagno "Crucifixion," circa 1442 (Former Convento di S. Maria degli Angeli, fresco). Figure 14 Convent of S. Apollonia, plan, 1741 (Florence, Archivio di Stato, Conventi Soppressi, 82, m. 207, c.1). Figure 15 Castagno, "Last Supper", "Resurrection, Crucifiction, and Entombment" circa 1447 (Florence, S. Apollonia, former refectory, fresco). Figure 16 Castagno "Crucifixion," (S. Apollonia, fresco). Figure 17 Paolo Schiavo "Crucifixion with Nuns in Devotion" 1447- 49 (Florence, S. Apollonia, fresco). Figure 18 Mary Beth Edelson " Some Living American Women Artists/ Last Supper," 1972. Figure 19 Renée Cox "Yo Mama's Last Supper," 1996, cibachrome print. Figure 20 Pistoian painter "Scenes from the Life of Saint Irene," 1325-30 (New York, private collection). Figure 21 School of Amiens "The Priesthood of Mary," 1438 (Paris, Musée du Louvre). Figure 22 School of Hieronymus Bosch, "Crucifixion of a Female Saint" (Venice, Doge's Palace). Figure 23 Donatello "Madonna and Child" (Padua, Chiesa del Santo, detail of main altar). Figure 24 Alesso Baldovinetti, "Annunciation" (Florence, S. Miniato, Chapel of the Cardinal of Portugal). Figure 25 Andrea del Castagno, "Saint Julian," ca. 1455 (Florence, SS. Annunziata, fresco). Figure 26 Castagno "Resurrection" detail of upper portion of the end wall of the refectory (S. Apollonia).
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  • Abstract: Andrea del Castagno’s Last Supper has been well known to art historians especially once it began to appear in general survey books more than forty years ago. Its treatment, however, was often either from the retrospective vantage point of Leonardo’s more famous example in Milan or in terms of the development of this theme within the context of monastery refectories in Florence. Since Castagno’s Last Supper was commissioned for a convent of Benedictine nuns, research about gender and aspects of women’s piety is brought to bear in an exploration of how Castagno’s remarkable fresco related to its original female viewers. [Reproduced by permission of the College Art Association.]
  • Author's Affiliation: Fordham University
  • Conference Info: - , -
  • Year of Publication: 2006.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN/ISBN: 00043079
  • Material/Technique :
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