Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


54 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 43203
Author(s): Slefinger, John,
Contributor(s):
Title : Historicizing the Allegorical Eye: Reading Lady Mede
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 16., ( 2020):  Pages 85 - 100.
Year of Publication: 2020.

2. Record Number: 42121
Author(s): Lopez, Maria Isabel Rodriguez,
Contributor(s):
Title : La personificación del mar: evolución y transformaciones iconográficas del Mundo Clásico al Medioevo
Source: Revista Digital de Iconografia Medieval , 9., 17 ( 2017):  Pages 125 - 140. Available open access on the Revista Digital de Iconografía Medieval site: https://www.ucm.es/data/cont/docs/621-2017-06-23-Personificaci%C3%B3n%20del%20mar.pdf.
Year of Publication: 2017.

3. Record Number: 29191
Author(s): Timmermann, Achim,
Contributor(s):
Title : Frau Venus, the Eucharist, and the Jews of Landshut
Source: Judaism and Christian Art: Aesthetic Anxieties from the Catacombs to Colonialism.   Edited by Herbert L. Kessler and David Nirenberg .   university of Pennsylvania Press, 2011. Revista Digital de Iconografia Medieval , 9., 17 ( 2017):  Pages 183 - 202.
Year of Publication: 2011.

4. Record Number: 29256
Author(s): Rowe, Nina,
Contributor(s):
Title : Rethinking "Ecclesia" and "Synagoga" in the Thirteenth Century [The author argues that the representation of "Synagoga" in the sculptural programs at Bamberg, Reims, and Strasbourg was meant to project a view of Judaism as subordinate to "Ecclesia" triumphant and to the kingly rulers on the portals. Title note suppl
Source: Gothic Art and Thought in the Later Medieval Period: Essays in Honor of Willibald Sauerländer.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Penn State University Press, 2011. Revista Digital de Iconografia Medieval , 9., 17 ( 2017):  Pages 264 - 291.
Year of Publication: 2011.

5. Record Number: 15806
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Gerson's Stance on Women [Anderson argues that scholarly opinion about Jean Gerson has been excessively negative. Gerson was capable of being controlling with his sisters and suspecting the inspiration of mystics like Bridget of Sweden, whom he blamed in part for the Great Schism. He was, however, capable of being supportive of devout women; and his criticisms of male figures who erred must be taken into account. Moreover, Gerson was capable of supporting Joan of Arc and, for a time, Ermine of Reims, despite their not fitting into passive roles. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: A Companion to Jean Gerson.   Edited by Brian Patrick McGuire Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition: A Series of handbooks and reference works on the intellectual and religious life of Europe, 500-1700 .   Brill, 2006. Revista Digital de Iconografia Medieval , 9., 17 ( 2017):  Pages 293 - 315.
Year of Publication: 2006.

6. Record Number: 12611
Author(s): Denny-Brown, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : How Philosophy Matters: Death, Sex, Clothes, and Boethius [Lady Philosophy’s garment has an important symbolic significance, yet Boethius still depicts it as a material object. The materiality of Philosophy’s garment unsettles her supposed status as a purely immaterial abstraction. The corporeal status of her sexually-violated body and the gaps in her garment align her with the Muses of Poetry, negating a perception of Philosophy as pure, perfect, or whole. Her imperfect garment and female body thus symbolize human loss, corruption and mortality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Revista Digital de Iconografia Medieval , 9., 17 ( 2017):  Pages 177 - 191.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 12612
Author(s): Kay, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Flayed Skin as "objet a": Representation and Materiality in Guillaume de Deguileville’s "Pelerinage de vie humaine" [Allusions to flaying and stripping human flesh abound in Guillaume’s didactic allegory, which features female personifications embodying various abstractions. In the case of the Deadly Sins, flaying skin is linked to bodily punishment; in the case of Virtues, flayed skin alludes to Scripture and written documents (manuscripts being written on parchment, or flayed animal skin). Although Guillaume’s flaying theme presents skin as in some ways pointing towards a sublime immortality, the materiality of skin also represents the mortality of the body. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Revista Digital de Iconografia Medieval , 9., 17 ( 2017):  Pages 193 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 10853
Author(s): Keen, Catherine M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the Medieval City: Viewing the Body Politic from Exile in Early Italian Verse [Keen examines poems by four authors in exile (Dante, Cino da Pistoia, Pietro dei Faitinelli, and Niccolò del Rosso) in which the natal city is depicted as a beautiful woman; sometimes she is to be pitied, but other times she is hateful. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Revista Digital de Iconografia Medieval , 9., 17 ( 2017):  Pages 155 - 171.
Year of Publication: 2004.

9. Record Number: 14696
Author(s): Lee, Becky R.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Hysteric and Psychedelic Psychologist: A Revaluation of the Mysticism of Margery Kempe in the Light of the Transpersonal Psychology of Stanislav Grof
Source: Studia Mystica , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 102 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 6617
Author(s): Randolph, Adrian W. B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Renaissance Household Goddesses: Fertility, Politics, and the Gendering of the Spectatorship [the author argues that these terracotta statuettes of Dovizia (a woman with a basket of fruit on her head who is leading a little boy), based on Donatello's statue now lost, can be read both as an embodiment of wealth and fertility and as a political, public symbol of the city and reminder of the pre-Medicean era; the author explores the implications of both female and male spectatorship].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Revista Digital de Iconografia Medieval , 9., 17 ( 2017):  Pages 163 - 189.
Year of Publication: 2002.

11. Record Number: 7833
Author(s): Sluhovsky, Moshe.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Devil in the Convent
Source: American Historical Review , 107., 5 (December 2002):  Pages 1378 - 1411.
Year of Publication: 2002.

12. Record Number: 7825
Author(s): Elliott, Dyan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing Double: John Gerson, the Discernment of Spirits, and Joan of Arc
Source: American Historical Review , 107., 1 (February 2002):  Pages 26 - 54.
Year of Publication: 2002.

13. Record Number: 6220
Author(s): Keen, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the city: desire, distance, and politco-erotic manoeuvres in early Italian verse
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. American Historical Review , 107., 1 (February 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

14. Record Number: 10645
Author(s): Karkov, Catherine E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Broken Bodies and Singing Tongues: Gender and Voice in the Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 23 "Psychomachia" [The author argues that the Anglo-Saxon reader of the "Psychomachia" and the "Passio Sancti Romani" (also by Prudentius) was encouraged through text and illustrations to see the self as masculine and the body as feminine. Karkov notes that the Anglo-Saxon "Psychomachia" manuscripts were the first to depict the Virtues and Vices as primarily female, rather than the earlier practice of Virtues as male warriors and the Vices as monsters. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 30., ( 2001):  Pages 115 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2001.

15. Record Number: 5557
Author(s): Caciola, Nancy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mystics, Demoniacs, and the Physiology of Spirit Possession in Medieval Europe
Source: Comparative Studies in Society and History , 42., 2 (April 2000):  Pages 268 - 306.
Year of Publication: 2000.

16. Record Number: 8591
Author(s): Cowling, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Verbal and Visual Metaphors in the Cambridge Manuscript of the "Douze dames de rhétorique" (1463) [The text developed as an exchange of correspondence between the young, eager Jean Robertet and the respected older poet Georges Chastelain. Several of the manuscript versions include elaborate illustrations. The author explores how the artist was able to express the involved metaphors and prompt an allegorical reading of the images. The Appendix presents the text and English translations of the "enseignes" or self-descriptions of the twelve ladies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 3., ( 2000):  Pages 94 - 118.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 10159
Author(s): Benedetti, Roberto.
Contributor(s):
Title : Teodora e il travestimento mistico nel diciottesimo dei "Miracles de Nostre Dame par personnages" [The legend of Theodora of Alexandria, found in the "Miracles de Notre Dame par personnages," was composed in French and based on the "Legenda Aurea." Theodora adopted men's clothing to escape attempted seduction, and she embraced the life of a monk. Accused of rape, she endured that calumny in silence. Such hagiographic tales did not soften condemnation of cross dressing outside of carnival season. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Études Médiévales , 1., ( 1999):  Pages 21 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1999.

18. Record Number: 5434
Author(s): Paxson, James J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender Personified, Personification Gendered, and the Body Figuralized in "Piers Plowman" [The author first considers the tradition of personifications embodied as females and then argues that the gender of Meed and Anima are key feature in Langland's allegory].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 65 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1998.

19. Record Number: 2556
Author(s): Brown, Elizabeth A. R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ritual Brotherhood in Western Medieval Europe [discussion of compacts and ceremonies, the secular nature of the evidence in contrast to Byzantine liturgies, and the social and political aspects including the unlikelihood of a sexual relationship].
Source: Traditio , 52., ( 1997):  Pages 357 - 381.
Year of Publication: 1997.

20. Record Number: 2554
Author(s): Rapp, Claudia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ritual Brotherhood in Byzantium [presents sources for the study of "adelphopoiesis," traces changes in the practice and concept of ritual brotherhood over time, and places it within the larger context of social networks which included marriage, godparenthood, and adoption].
Source: Traditio , 52., ( 1997):  Pages 285 - 326.
Year of Publication: 1997.

21. Record Number: 2555
Author(s): Shaw, Brent D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ritual Brotherhood in Roman and Post-Roman Societies [argues that ritual brotherhood was a common arrangement in frontier societies, particularly in the Balkans, where protection and defense came from personal relationships rather than political institutions].
Source: Traditio , 52., ( 1997):  Pages 327 - 355.
Year of Publication: 1997.

22. Record Number: 7185
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Symbols, Performers, and Sponsors: Female Musical Creators in the Late Middle Ages [The author examines representations of "Musica," one of the seven liberal arts, as a woman along with reports of women performing music and commissioning music. The author argues that women had a much greater role in creating music than modern scholars have realized. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rediscovering the Muses: Women's Musical Traditions.   Edited by Kimberly Marshall .   Northeastern University Press, 1993. Traditio , 52., ( 1997):  Pages 140 - 168.
Year of Publication: 1993.

23. Record Number: 9529
Author(s): Brownlee, Kevin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Commentary and the Rhetoric of Exemplarity: Griseldis in Petrarch, Philippe de Mezieres, and the "Estoire" [The story of patient Griselda was retold throughout the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries in different languages; in each treatment of the story, authors see Griselda as an exemplary figure, but they disagree on what exactly she exemplifies. Petrarch portrays Griselda’s submission to her husband figuratively (she represents a Christian’s submission to God). For Philippe, Griselda’s story has both figurative and literal meanings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: South Atlantic Quarterly , 91., 4 (Fall 1992):  Pages 865 - 890.
Year of Publication: 1992.

24. Record Number: 10807
Author(s): Sheingorn, Pamela.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virtues of Hildegard's “Ordo Virtutum”; or, It Was a Woman's World [The author argues that Hildegard's “Ordo Virtutum” uses female personifications of Virtues in a way that employs a concept of the universal as female rather than male. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Ordo Virtutum of Hildegard of Bingen: Critical Studies.   Edited by Audrey Ekdahl Davidson .   Medieval Institute Publications, 1992. South Atlantic Quarterly , 91., 4 (Fall 1992):  Pages 43 - 62.
Year of Publication: 1992.

25. Record Number: 11218
Author(s): Carlson, Paula J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lady Meed and God’s Meed: The Grammar of 'Piers Plowman' B 3 and C 4 [In revising his poem, William Langland expands a passage (in what is known as the B-text) into a longer passage (in what is known as the C-text) that describes the debate between Conscience and Lady Meed. Much of modern readers’ confusion about the meaning of the C-text passage lies in the misleading punctuation in W. W. Skeat’s printed edition of the poem. The editor’s punctuation choices obscure the sustained grammatical metaphor Langland uses in the revised C-text. In this new passage, the relationship between nouns and adjectives are meant to describe (by way of analogy) the relationship between God and humanity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 46., ( 1991):  Pages 291 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1991.

26. Record Number: 11216
Author(s): Cooper, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Personification in "Piers Plowman" [Although most allegorical writings associate personifications with femininity (abstract nouns often being grammatically feminine in Latin and Romance languages), Langland’s Middle English poem genders personifications based on what attribute they are intended to represent, sometimes representing them as male and sometimes as female. The Seven Deadly Sins, for instance, are not personified as abstract concepts but are exemplified in the behavior of representative individuals (both men and women). Rather than seeing various figures in the poem as allegorical, medieval rhetoricians would claim they are metonyms (parts or attributes representing the larger whole). Thus male figures in the poem can be read as representing particular aspects of the (male) poet’s self. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 5., ( 1991):  Pages 31 - 48.
Year of Publication: 1991.

27. Record Number: 11823
Author(s): Lucas, Angela M. and Peter J. Lucas
Contributor(s):
Title : The Presentation of Marriage and Love in Chaucer's "Franklin's Tale" [Chaucer's depiction of the husband and wife this poem conveys the intimacy of a marital relationship in which the spouses are mutually bound to one another through love (rather than obedience). Nonetheless, the public wedding ceremony between the spouses in the poem demonstrates the importance of outwardly displaying the husband's "maistrie" or dominance in the marriage relationship. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Studies , 72., 6 ( 1991):  Pages 501 - 512.
Year of Publication: 1991.

28. Record Number: 12700
Author(s): Fabianski, Marcin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Federigo da Montefeltro's "Studiolo" in Gubbio Reconsidered. Its Decoration and Its Iconographic Program: An Interpretation [The series of painted panels in a duke's study, attributed to fifteenth century painter Joos van Gent (also known as Justus of Ghent or Giusto da Guanto), depict men kneeling before female personifications of the Liberal Arts. Although the exact attribution, purpose, or arrangement of the panels is unknown, the author suggests a team of artists was instructed to follow a program of iconography of the Arts and Virtues, with revisions to the program (including the inclusion of a duke's likeness and an oration scene) made at the request of the patron. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 11., 22 ( 1990):  Pages 199 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1990.

29. Record Number: 11192
Author(s): Harris, Barbara J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Property, Power, and Personal Relations: Elite Mothers and Sons in Yorkist and Early Tudor England [Women were often marginalized by patriarchal power structures that placed the father at the head of the family, but the birth of a son often elevated the wife’s position. Since the first son was greatly valued in a system of primogenitural inheritance, noble mothers often had close emotional ties to their sons. The political and social future of the family often rested on the mother’s ability to manage the household, display the family’s wealth and status, and negotiate marriages and other alliances for the family’s children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 15, 3 (Spring 1990): 606-632. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

30. Record Number: 28750
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Title : Rebecca and Eliezer
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Meister_der_Wiener_Genesis_002.jpg/250px-Meister_der_Wiener_Genesis_002.jpg
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31. Record Number: 28820
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Title : Personification of Ktisis (“Foundation”/”Donation”/”Creation”)
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32. Record Number: 28950
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Title : Effects of Good Government (detail)
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33. Record Number: 28956
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Title : Desco da parto [Birth tray] depicting The Triumph of Love
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Title : Hercules at the Crossroads
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/7b/Narrenschiff_-_Heracles_on_the_crossroads.jpg/250px-Narrenschiff_-_Heracles_on_the_crossroads.jpg
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Title : Philosophy and the Seven Liberal Arts
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/71/Septem-artes-liberales_Herrad-von-Landsberg_Hortus-deliciarum_1180.jpg/250px-Septem-artes-liberales_Herrad-von-Landsberg_Hortus-deliciarum_1180.jpg
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Title : Portrait of Princess Anicia Juliana
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37. Record Number: 30909
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Title : Primavera (Spring)
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38. Record Number: 30915
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Title : Birth of Venus
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39. Record Number: 30925
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Title : Moon
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40. Record Number: 30927
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Title : Liberal Arts of the Quadrivium
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41. Record Number: 30928
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Title : Seven Liberal Arts
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42. Record Number: 30931
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Title : Synagoga
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43. Record Number: 30951
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Title : Medal of Cecilia Gonzaga (reverse)
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Title : Diptych Panel, detail, Personification of Rome
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Title : Probus Magnus Panel
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46. Record Number: 31657
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Title : Humility Presenting Hope with the Severed Head of Pride
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47. Record Number: 31687
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Title : The Crowning of Heinrich II and Kunigunde, from the Pericopes of Henry II
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48. Record Number: 31689
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Title : Fortune Turning her Wheel, from the Moralia in Job
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49. Record Number: 32405
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Title : The Kilpeck Sheela-na-Gig
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50. Record Number: 35098
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Title : Crowned bust of a woman
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51. Record Number: 35185
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Title : The Soul Entrusts her Heart to the Fear of God and to Contrition
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52. Record Number: 36214
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Title : Personified figures of Humility and Pride from Somme le roi
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53. Record Number: 36279
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Title : Heinrich Suso sees Eternal Wisdom as Christ and a goddess
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54. Record Number: 43160
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Title : Philosophy presents the seven liberal arts
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