Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


72 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 27576
Author(s): Georgiadou, Sofia,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Architectural Projects of Nikephoros I Komnenos Doukas (1266/8-1296/8) and Anna Palaiologina in Arta, Epiros
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 83 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2009.

2. Record Number: 24050
Author(s): Smith, Kathryn A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Book, Body, and the Construction of Self in the Taymouth Hours [The author analyzes miniatures and bas de page illustrations in a book of hours made for an English royal woman in the 1330s. Smith finds evidence of models of appropriate devout behavior for the laity. The portrait of the book owner at prayer during mass shows her with hands extended and the book of hours at her side. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009.  Pages 173 - 204.
Year of Publication: 2009.

3. Record Number: 11759
Author(s): Hayum, Andrée
Contributor(s):
Title : A Renaissance Audience Considered: The Nuns at S. Apollonia and Castagno's "Last Supper" [The author explores the possible meanings of the Castagno fresco for the nuns who commissioned the work for their refectory in the monastery of Santa Apollonia in Florence. Hayum notes Castagno's dramatic effects in the scale of figures and the spatial illusion. This kind of immediacy fits with the numerous decoration in the monastery representing nuns recieving blessings from Saint Apollonia and praying before Christ on the crucifix. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Art Bulletin , 88., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 243 - 266.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 11758
Author(s): Heller, Ena Giurescu.
Contributor(s):
Title : Access to Salvation: The Place (and Space) of Women Patrons in Fourteenth-century Florence [The author provides a case study of Monna Andrea Acciaiuoli's patronage of her husband's family chapel in Santa Maria Novella. She commissioned the glass windows and the altarpiece. Heller raises the question of whether Monna Andrea and other female patrons had access to these family chapels beyond the rood screen. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. Art Bulletin , 88., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 161 - 183.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 14124
Author(s): Legaré, Anne-Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : La librairye de Madame: Two Princesses and Their Libraries [The author briefly surveys the manuscripts belonging to Margaret of York and Margaret of Austria. Margaret of York acquired a small number of French religious texts in line with her roles as wife and potential mother. In contrast her step-granddaughter c
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005. Art Bulletin , 88., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 206 - 219.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 14118
Author(s): De Jonge, Krista.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Principal Residences in Mechelen: The Court of Cambrai and the Court of Savoy [The author briefly discusses Margaret of York's rebuilding of the residence known as the "Court of Cambrai" in Mechelen, Belgium. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005. Art Bulletin , 88., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 56 - 66.
Year of Publication: 2005.

7. Record Number: 11530
Author(s): Bourdua, Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Guariento's Crucifix for Maria Bovolini in San Francesco, Bassano: Women and Franciscan Art in Italy During the Later
Source: Pope, Church and City: Essays in Honour of Brenda M. Bolton.   Edited by Frances Andrews, Christoph Egger and Constance M. Rousseau Medieval Mediterranean .   Brill, 2004. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 309 - 323.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 14633
Author(s): Clear, Matthew J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maria of Hungary as Queen, Patron, and Exemplar [The author considers Mary of Hungary's areas of influence including her role as regent ("vicar") during her husband's absences, her economic resources for political and religious activities, and her importance to her many family members as a support and a role model. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 45 - 60.
Year of Publication: 2004.

9. Record Number: 20789
Author(s): Stanbury, Sarah
Contributor(s):
Title : The clock in Filippino Lippi's Annunciation Tondo [Investigates the significance of Lippi's inclusion of a mechanical clock in his painting of the Annunciation in Gimignano through comparative analysis of contemporary works by Ghirlandaio and Botticelli. Issues of the cultural transition from feudal to merchant economy and domestic order are discussed, and the significance of the clock as a memento mori is disputed. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 197 - 219.
Year of Publication: 2004.

10. Record Number: 14635
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Architectural Context of Santa Maria Donna Regina [The author briefly surveys three aspects of the church's architecture: the organization of the spaces, the particular needs of Clarissan churches, and the development of the church's design in relation to other Neapolitan churches, especially the cathedral with the tomb of Charles I. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 79 - 92.
Year of Publication: 2004.

11. Record Number: 14640
Author(s): Elliott, Janis.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Last Judgement": The Cult of Sacral Kingship and Dynastic Hopes for the Afterlife [The author argues that Queen Mary of Hungary used her royal patronage to create an iconography that was personally meaningful to her as well as an embodiment of the dynastic concerns of the Angevin house. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 175 - 193.
Year of Publication: 2004.

12. Record Number: 10901
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Tomb of Adelaide of Maurienne and the Visual Imagery of Capetian Queenship [The author argues that while Adelaide's seal establishes her authority through stable conservative imagery, her tomb sculpture marks her as an individual with a special connection to the sacred site. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 45 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2003.

13. Record Number: 10908
Author(s): Stanton, Anne Rudloff.
Contributor(s):
Title : Isabelle of France and Her Manuscripts, 1308-58 [The manuscripts range in time across the queen's career. Some appear to have been used as readings for her children, while others were psalters and books of hours for Isabelle's private devotions. Women feature prominently in the illuminations, and political issues, such as Edward's shortcomings as a king, apparently are also a preoccupation. Title note supplied by Feminae. ].
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 225 - 252.
Year of Publication: 2003.

14. Record Number: 10659
Author(s): Murphy, Kevin J.F.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lilium inter spinas: Bianca Spini and the Decoration of the Spini Chapel in Santa Trinita [The author argues that Bianca, the widowed daughter of a wealthy and powerful member of the Spini family, commissioned an altarpiece for the family chapel with references to her personal identity. As a widow who evidently chose not to remarry, Bianca struggled with her husband's family for restitution of her dowry. The frequent suspicions about unmarried women's virtue seem to be answered in the Spini altarpiece painting of the Assumption by the Virgin's purity and authority. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Italian History and Culture , 8., ( 2002):  Pages 51 - 65.
Year of Publication: 2002.

15. Record Number: 7250
Author(s): Golden, Judith K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Instruction, Marie de Bretagne, and the Life of St. Eustace as Illustrated in British Library Ms. Egerton 745 [The author argues that Egerton 745 was commissioned by Marie de Bretagne, daughter of a duke of Brittany and granddaughter of a king and queen of England (hence the saints' lives included for two Breton saints and Edward the Confessor). She had the manuscript prepared for her son, choosing to emphasize role models, especially Saint Eustace, who were good husbands, fathers, and Christians. The Appendix lists and describes twenty-two works of art that represent the cycle of St. Eustace's life. Also included is a table that charts the various episodes represented in the twenty-two art works. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):  Pages 60 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2002.

16. Record Number: 6216
Author(s): Hamilton, Tracy Chapman.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Fabrication of Gendered Memory: Queenship, Topography, and Scholastic Patronage of the Colleges de Navarre and Bourgogne in Fourteenth-Century Paris
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Studies in Iconography , 25., ( 2004):
Year of Publication: 2002.

17. Record Number: 8425
Author(s): Bourdua, Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Altichiero's "Anchona" for Margareta Lupi: A Context for a Lost Painting [The author uses documents, including an expense list for Margareta's trousseau, to establish the existence of the now-lost painting and the relationships around the condottiere Bonifacio Lupi. He commissioned the small panel painting by Altichiero for Ma
Source: Burlington Magazine , 144., 1190 (May 2002):  Pages 291 - 293.
Year of Publication: 2002.

18. Record Number: 6239
Author(s): Gaunt, Simon B.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Women Patrons of Neri di Bicci [The author surveys the works that ten secular women commissioned from the painter Neri di Bicci between 1453 and 1475; the author analyzes the group of women in terms of marital status and social class and compares them with the men who requested art wor
Source: Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Sheryl E. Reiss and David G. Wilkins .   Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, Volume 54. Truman State University Press, 2001. Italian History and Culture , 8., ( 2002):  Pages 51 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2001.

19. Record Number: 5539
Author(s): Baader, Gerhard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Elections of Abbesses and Notions of Identity in Fifteenth- and Sixteenth-Century Italy, with Special Reference to Venice
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 54, 2 (Summer 2001): 389-429. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

20. Record Number: 5540
Author(s): Radke, Gary M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nuns and Their Art: The Case of San Zaccaria in Renaissance Venice [the nuns of San Zaccaria, mostly of good birth, had a symbiotic relationship with the city of Venice; public and private interests supported the nuns; and they responded by, among other things, patronizing art that was seen by visitors to their church; during the fifteenth century the nuns both redecorated their original church and, in the 1460s, built a new church alongside the old; the nuns not only funded these projects, they supervised the work to see that their wishes were heeded].
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 54, 2 (Summer 2001): 430-459. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

21. Record Number: 6238
Author(s): Crum, Roger J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Controlling Women or Women Controlled? Suggestions for Gender Roles and Visual Culture in the Italian Renaissance Palace ["I suggest that Renaissance husbands may have involved women in the patronage process, the stewardship of material goods, and the education of children through works of art to involve them directly in the family's material wealth and to engender lineage-sustaining loyalty to the marital family. This message would have been reinforced by the themes of humility, chastity, obedience, and dutiful motherhood that characterize the greater part of Renaissance 'cassoni,' 'spalliere,' and domestic devotional works that these women beheld on a daily basis. And, of course, all of these goods were introduced into and helped to shape a palace environment that was itself highly gendered in terms of space, function, and communication." (Page 45)].
Source: Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Sheryl E. Reiss and David G. Wilkins .   Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, Volume 54. Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 37 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2001.

22. Record Number: 6240
Author(s): Jenkens, A. Lawrence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Caterina Piccolomini and the Palazzo delle Papesse in Siena [the author surveys the works that ten secular women commissioned from the painter Neri di Bicci between 1453 and 1475; the author analyzes the group of women in terms of marital status and social class and compares them with the men who requested art works in Neri's records; women ordered significantly more works for display in churches rather than in homes and their works were more costly with gilt and expensive colors].
Source: Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Sheryl E. Reiss and David G. Wilkins .   Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, Volume 54. Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 77 - 91.
Year of Publication: 2001.

23. Record Number: 6236
Author(s): Wilkins, David G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: Recognizing New Patrons, Posing New Questions [The author identifies secular women as important patrons of art whose identities and motivations need to be explored].
Source: Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Sheryl E. Reiss and David G. Wilkins .   Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, Volume 54. Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 1 - 17.
Year of Publication: 2001.

24. Record Number: 6237
Author(s): Kohl, Benjamin G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fina da Carrara, née Buzzacarini: Consort, Mother, and Patron of Art in Trecento Padua [the author provides some information about Fina's family, the Buzzacarini, and about the Carrara including the four children that Fina bore; Fina's patronage activities concern her tomb in the Baptistery with frescoes by Giusto de'Menabuoi; the author notes the portraits of Fina represented there, not only the donor portrait but the representation of Fina and her three daughters as onlookers at the birth of John the Baptist].
Source: Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Sheryl E. Reiss and David G. Wilkins .   Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, Volume 54. Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 19 - 35.
Year of Publication: 2001.

25. Record Number: 10643
Author(s): Dunlop, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Once More on the Patronage of Ambrogio Lorenzetti's Frescoes at S. Galgano Montesiepi [In suggesting a new patron for the frescoes (a lay-brother associated with the monastery), Dunlop explores the Virgin Mary's role in the paintings done by Lorenzetti. The theme of calling and acceptance is represented both in the Annunciation and in the one scene from Galgano's life. Mary is also presented as the Queen of Heaven to her Cistercian knightly followers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 63., ( 2000):  Pages 387 - 403.
Year of Publication: 2000.

26. Record Number: 4872
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : An Abbess and a Painter: Emilia Pannocchieschi d'Elci and a Fresco From the Circle of Simone Martini
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 14., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 273 - 300.
Year of Publication: 2000.

27. Record Number: 3775
Author(s): Havice, Christine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Approaching Medieval Women Through Medieval Art [the author provides an introductory overview touching on the images of medieval women (legendary and historical figures) in art and the roles that women played in the production of art, including recipients, sponsors, authors, and artists].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999. Byzantion , 69., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 345 - 389.
Year of Publication: 1999.

28. Record Number: 5142
Author(s): Thomas, Anabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Moving on from Joan Kelly Gadol [The author considers six recent books about women and Renaissance art, of which three deal with the Middle Ages ("Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy," "Women in Italian Renaissance Art," and "Renaissance Women Patrons"].
Source: Oxford Art Journal (Full Text via JSTOR) 22, 2 (1999): 144-153. Louise Bourgeois. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

29. Record Number: 7359
Author(s): Mckitterick, Rosamond.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Femmes, les arts et la culture en occident dans le haut moyen âge [The author examines the efforts made by learned women during the Carolingian era to promote Biblical knowledge and reform the liturgy. In monasteries high-born women copied important texts and wrote in all the valued literary genres. Royal and noblewomen, including Gisela, the sister of Charlemagne, and Rotrude, his daughter, developed relationships as patrons and allies with scholars and churchmen from whom they commissioned texts which responded to their religious needs. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Femmes et pouvoirs des femmes à Byzance et en Occident (VIe -XIe siècles). Colloque international organisé les 28, 29 et 30 mars 1996 à Bruxelles et Villeneuve d'Ascq.   Edited by Stéphane Lebecq, Alain Dierkens, Régine Le Jan, and Jean-Marie Sansterre .   Centre de Recherche sur l'Histoire de l'Europe du Nord-Ouest, Université Charles de Gaulle-Lille 3, 1999. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 63., ( 2000):  Pages 149 - 161.
Year of Publication: 1999.

30. Record Number: 4750
Author(s): Connor, Carolyn L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Documents: The Epigram in the Church of Hagios Polyeuktos in Constantinople and Its Byzantine Response [the author argues that Anicia Juliana herself may have composed the seventy-six line epigram that was inscribed inside and outside her magnificent church; later building inscriptions as well as books reacted to her family pride, sumptuous descriptions, and learned rhetoric that was reflected in her influential encomium/dedication; the appendices include a transcription of the Greek epigram that was inscribed in Hagios Polyeuktos; an English translation of the epigram; the Greek epigrams that were inscribed in the church of Saint Euphemia, a church that Juliana refurbished; a transcription of the Greek epigram from the Vienna Dioscurides manuscript (cod. med. gr. 1, fol. 6 verso) which forms an acrostic on Juliana's name; a transcription of the Greek epigram on the frieze of the church of Saints Sergius and Bacchus built by Justin and Theodora shortly after Hagios Polyeuktos].
Source: Byzantion , 69., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 479 - 527.
Year of Publication: 1999.

31. Record Number: 5680
Author(s): Thomas, Anabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Date for Neri di Bicci's S. Giovannino dei Cavalieri "Coronation of the Virgin" [the author presents document transcriptions in the article's Appendix that prove that Neri di Bicci was selected by the nuns of S. Niccolò dei Frieri to paint an altarpiece in 1488; further document extracts indicate the nuns' additional efforts to make the high altar more splendid].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1127 (February 1997): 103-106. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

32. Record Number: 5681
Author(s): Callegari, Raimondo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bernardo Bembo and Pietro Lombardo; News from the "Nonianum" [The author argues that the newly discovered low-relief sculpture of the Virgin and Child was commissioned by the humanist Bernardo Bembo and sculpted by Pietro Lombardo who, with his workshop, did many such images of the Virgin and Child in the 1480s].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1137 (December 1997): 862-866. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

33. Record Number: 1869
Author(s): Muir Wright, Rosemary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Great Whore in the Illustrated Apocalypse Cycles [traces the development of the image of the Whore of Babylon and discusses the impact that aristocratic female readers had on her representation in manuscripts both as the sovereign lady and as the evil other].
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 23., 3 (September 1997):  Pages 191 - 210.
Year of Publication: 1997.

34. Record Number: 815
Author(s): Anderson, Jaynie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rewriting the History of Art Patronage [women as patrons of art].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 2 (June 1996):  Pages 129 - 138.
Year of Publication: 1996.

35. Record Number: 816
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Painting in Late Fourteenth Century Padua: The Patronage of Fina Buzzacarini
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 2 (June 1996):  Pages 139 - 155.
Year of Publication: 1996.

36. Record Number: 1841
Author(s): Boyle, Marjorie O'Rourke.
Contributor(s):
Title : Coquette at the Cross? Magdalen in the Master of the Bartholomew Altar's Deposition at the Louvre [argues that Magdalen's depiction with gloves and ointment jar refers to her compassion not her earlier life as a courtesan ; the painting may have hung in the Antonite hospital in Paris and had special meaning for the patients, particularly those suffering from St. Anthony's Fire who would have had limbs amputated].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 59., 4 ( 1996):  Pages 573 - 577.
Year of Publication: 1996.

37. Record Number: 2515
Author(s): Halpin, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anglo-Saxon Women and Pilgrimage [discusses trips to the Continent, to English shrines, and pilgrimages of the "heart" through devotional texts and art; includes a brief analysis of four devotional objects, a crucifix, two manuscript illuminations, and an embroidered alb, that were commissioned by women].
Source: Anglo-Norman Studies , 19., ( 1996):  Pages 97 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1996.

38. Record Number: 24735
Author(s): Despres, Denise L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mary of the Eucharist: Cultic Anti-Judaism in Some Fourteenth-Century English Devotional Manuscripts
Source: From Witness to Witchcraft: Jews and Judaism in Medieval Christian Thought.   Edited by Jeremy Cohen .   Harrassowitz Verlag, 1996. Anglo-Norman Studies , 19., ( 1996):  Pages 375 - 401.
Year of Publication: 1996.

39. Record Number: 817
Author(s): Shepherd, Rupert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesca Venusta, the "Battle of San Ruffillo" and Giovanni Sabadino degli Arienti [Arienti's account of famous women mentions Francesca Venusta's patronage; She was a wealthy widow who probably commissioned the mural for the church of San Francesco to celebrate the Bolognese victory in 1361 over the forces of Bernabò Visconti].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 2 (June 1996):  Pages 156 - 170.
Year of Publication: 1996.

40. Record Number: 5676
Author(s): Karkov, Catherine E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesco Botticini's Palmieri Altar-piece [Matteo Palmieri commissioned the altarpiece from Botticini; the panel includes donor portraits of his wife Niccolosa (in a Benedictine habit) and himself; after Matteo's death Botticini and Niccolosa executed a document in 1477 agreeing that the contract for the altarpiece had been fulfilled; Niccolosa and Matteo's nephew acquired a chapel in S. Pier Maggiore where the altarpiece was installed and where Matteo was buried; the Appendix provides transcriptions of six documents, four concerning Botticini, one about the Palmieri chapel, and the first being the agreement between Niccolosa and Botticini].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 138, 1118 (May 1996): 308-314. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

41. Record Number: 3676
Author(s): Caviness, Madeline H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anchoress, Abbess, and Queen: Donors and Patrons or Intercessors and Matrons?
Source: The Cultural Patronage of Medieval Women.   Edited by June Hall McCash .   University of Georgia Press, 1996.  Pages 105 - 154. Reprinted in Art in the Medieval West and its Audience. By Madeline H. Caviness. Ashgate Variorum, 2001. Article 6.
Year of Publication: 1996.

42. Record Number: 819
Author(s): Tolley, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : States of Independence: Women Regents as Patrons of the Visual Arts in Renaissance France
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 2 (June 1996):  Pages 237 - 258.
Year of Publication: 1996.

43. Record Number: 3681
Author(s): Underhill, Frances A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Elizabeth de Burgh: Connoisseur and Patron [The author surveys Elizabeth de Burgh's extensive patronage of literary, academic, and artistic endeavors; she devoted her greatest efforts to Clare College, an unusual choice of patronage for the time.]
Source: The Cultural Patronage of Medieval Women.   Edited by June Hall McCash .   University of Georgia Press, 1996. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 2 (June 1996):  Pages 266 - 287.
Year of Publication: 1996.

44. Record Number: 230
Author(s): Long, Jane C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Salvation Through Meditation: The Tomb Frescoes in the Holy Confessors Chapel at Santa Croce in Florence [one prominently portrays a female donor]
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 1 (1995): 77-88. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

45. Record Number: 5673
Author(s): Gordon, Dillian and Anabel Thomas
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Document for the High Altar-piece for S. Benedetto Fuori della Porta Pinti, Florence [the document from the State Archives in Florence records the commission in 1407 of an altarpiece at S. Benedetto by a wealthy layman].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 137, 1112 (November 1995): 720-722. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

46. Record Number: 5651
Author(s): Gardner, Julian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nuns and Altarpieces: Agendas for Research [the author examines a group of late thirteenth-century paintings from Italian nunneries and a group of fourteenth-century convent altarpieces, mostly from Florence; he then considers the social, cultural, and physical conditions in which these artworks were created and viewed; he concludes by asking what kind of control did the nuns have over artworks that were commissioned through middlemen and, for that matter, did the nuns even see the altarpieces located beyond the grills required by "clausura"].
Source: Römisches Jahrbuch der Bibliotheca Hertziana , 30., ( 1995):  Pages 27 - 57.
Year of Publication: 1995.

47. Record Number: 5669
Author(s): Von Teuffel, Christa Gardner.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Contract for Perugino's "Assumption of the Virgin" at Vallambrosa [between 1498 and 1500, Perugino was commissioned to paint the altarpiece for the monks at Vallambrosa by Don Biagio Milanesi, member of a wealthy family and general of the order; the Appendix presents five documents related to the painting, including the contract, further instructions, a subcontract, a record of payment, and excerpts from Don Biagio's brother's will, demonstrating the family's support of the Vallambrosan order].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 137, 1106 (May 1995): 307-312. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

48. Record Number: 9519
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queen Sancia of Mallorca and the Convent Church of Sta. Chiara in Naples [The author argues that the convent church building significantly departs from previous models of architectural planning in the Poor Clare tradition. In part she attributes this to Queen Sancia's deep devotion to the original ideals of Francis which prompted her to found a double house and redesign the church layout so that the nuns could see the host while remaining unseen by the laity and the Friars. The queen also was reacting to ecclesiastical controversies in which her own relatives took leading roles as proponents of the Franciscan Spirituals against Pope John XXII. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 40., ( 1995):  Pages 69 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1995.

49. Record Number: 4684
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women as Patrons: Nuns, Widows, and Rulers
Source: Siena, Florence, and Padua: Art, Society, and Religion, 1280-1400. Volume II: Case Studies.   Edited by Diana Norman .   Yale University Press in association with The Open University, 1995.  Pages 242 - 266.
Year of Publication: 1995.

50. Record Number: 1683
Author(s): McKitterick, Rosamond.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ottonian Intellectual Culture in the Tenth Century and the Role of Theophano
Source: The Empress Theophano: Byzantium and the West at the Turn of the First Millennium.   Edited by Adelbert Davids .   Cambridge University Press, 1995.  Pages 169 - 193.
Year of Publication: 1995.

51. Record Number: 149
Author(s): Sekules, Veronica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beauty and the Beast: Ridicule and Orthodoxy in Architectural Marginalia in Early Fourteenth-Century Lincolnshire [sculpted corbels, several of women representing various sins].
Source: Art History , 18., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 37 - 62.
Year of Publication: 1995.

52. Record Number: 95
Author(s): Wood, Jeryldene M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Breaking the Silence: The Poor Clares and the Visual Arts in Fifteenth-Century Italy
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 48, 2 (Summer 1995): 262-286. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

53. Record Number: 5052
Author(s): Kamerick, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Patronage and Devotion in the Prayer Book of Anne of Brittany, Newberry Library MS 83 [The author analyzes the prayer book, arguing that the individualized contents reflect the queen's concerns including safe delivery from childbirth, private prayers during Mass, and the steps necessary to earn indulgences].
Source: Manuscripta , 39., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 40 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1995.

54. Record Number: 515
Author(s): Havice, Christine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Production of Art in the Middle Ages: The Significance of Context [women as artists, sponsors, and authors].
Source: Double Vision: Perspectives on Gender and the Visual Arts.   Edited by Natalie Harris Bluestone .   Associated University Presses, 1995. Manuscripta , 39., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 67 - 94.
Year of Publication: 1995.

55. Record Number: 2694
Author(s): Schiferl, Ellen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Caritas and the Iconography of Italian Confraternity Art [explores the iconography of the Madonna della Misericordia, the Madonna of Humility, and the Flagellation of Christ within the lay context of the confraternity where the themes of charity, humility, and mercy were expressed by love for one's neighbor, love for God, and the hope of salvation; also includes an appendix that lists Italian confraternity art, both sculpture and painting, for each of the three themes, 1300-1515].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 14., ( 1995):  Pages 207 - 246.
Year of Publication: 1995.

56. Record Number: 1532
Author(s): Lozinski, Jean Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Henri II, Aliénor d'Aquitane et la cathédrale de Poitiers
Source: Cahiers de Civilization Médiévale , 37., ( 1994):  Pages 91 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1994.

57. Record Number: 1810
Author(s): Gould, Cecil.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Early History of Leonardo's "Vierge aux Rochers" in the Louvre [argues that the earlier version of the painting was commandered by Il Moro as a wedding gift for his niece, Bianca Maria Sforza, and her new husband, the Emperor Maximilian I].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 124., 1511 (décembre 1994):  Pages 215 - 222.
Year of Publication: 1994.

58. Record Number: 1807
Author(s): Maginnis, Hayden B.J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Duccio's Rucellai: "Madonna" and the Origins of Florentine Painting
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 123., 1503 (avril 1994):  Pages 147 - 164.
Year of Publication: 1994.

59. Record Number: 3516
Author(s): Roberts, Ann M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chiara Gambacorta of Pisa as Patroness of the Arts [the author argues that Prioress Chiara Gambacorta had an important role in commissioning and in choosing the subject, style, and imagery of the paintings produced for the convent of San Domenico, many of which represented female saints including Catherine of Siena and Bridget of Sweden].
Source: Creative Women in Medieval and Early Modern Italy: A Religious and Artistic Renaissance.   Edited by E. Ann Matter and John Coakley .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994. Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 123., 1503 (avril 1994):  Pages 120 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1994.

60. Record Number: 10225
Author(s): King, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval and Renaissance Matrons, Italian-style [Women were able to commission art and architecture in fourteenth and fifteenth century Italy in a variety of ways, even if their involvement in the production of images and construction of buildings wasn’t as widespread as men’s. For instance, wealthy widows could control the making of large, public images such as funerary altarpieces, while nuns could commission artwork and buildings through convent endowments. Through their acts of patronage, these “matrons” challenged conventional expectations that women inhabit a small, private sphere. The author also analyzes how women chose to represent themselves visually within the works they commissioned. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 372 - 393.
Year of Publication: 1992.

61. Record Number: 14681
Author(s): Blockmans, Wim.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Devotion of a Lonely Duchess [The author briefly surveys the life of Margaret of York, concentrating on her involvement in politics, art patronage, charity in particular toward children, support of the church, and commissioning of manuscripts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margaret of York, Simon Marmion, and "The Visions of Tondal": Papers Delivered at a Symposium organized by the Department of Manuscripts of the J. Paul Getty Museum in Collaboration with the Huntington Library and Art Collections, June 21-24, 1990.   Edited by Thomas Kren .   J. Paul Getty Museum, 1992. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 29 - 46.
Year of Publication: 1992.

62. Record Number: 10298
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Art, Enclosure and the "Cura Monialium": Prolegomena in the Guise of a Postscript [The author addresses the question of female spirituality in the Middle Ages by looking both at monastic architecture and female patronage within the visual arts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 108-134. Link InfoReprinted in The Visual and the Visionary: Art and Female Spirituality in Late Medieval Germany. By Jeffrey F. Hamburger. Zone Books, 1998. Pages 35-109.
Year of Publication: 1992.

63. Record Number: 8486
Author(s): Guerrini, Paola.
Contributor(s):
Title : Il Bessarione a Grottaferrata: un'ipotesi sulla donazione dell'icona [Bessarion of Nicaea, while a cardinal resident in Rome, was commendatory abbot of the abbey at Grottaferrata. Among his donations to the abbey was an icon of the Virgin Mary painted in a Byzantine pictorial style. Although some elements of the painting are common to Rome in the Middle Ages, some elements, especially the inclusion of Saint Nilus in the triptych, are purely local to Grottaferrata. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studi Medievali , 32., 2 (Dicembre 1991):  Pages 807 - 814.
Year of Publication: 1991.

64. Record Number: 10891
Author(s): Hunt, Lucy-Anne
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman’s Prayer to Saint Sergios in Latin Syria: Interpreting a Thirteenth-century Icon at Mount Sinai [The icons at Saint Catherine’s Monastery at Mount Sinai include one depicting a black-veiled woman keeling in prayer before an equestrian Saint Sergios. The symbolic significance of the woman’s black veil is unknown, but the painting may indicate the imp
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 15., ( 1991):  Pages 96 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1991.

65. Record Number: 12700
Author(s): Fabianski, Marcin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Federigo da Montefeltro's "Studiolo" in Gubbio Reconsidered. Its Decoration and Its Iconographic Program: An Interpretation [The series of painted panels in a duke's study, attributed to fifteenth century painter Joos van Gent (also known as Justus of Ghent or Giusto da Guanto), depict men kneeling before female personifications of the Liberal Arts. Although the exact attribution, purpose, or arrangement of the panels is unknown, the author suggests a team of artists was instructed to follow a program of iconography of the Arts and Virtues, with revisions to the program (including the inclusion of a duke's likeness and an oration scene) made at the request of the patron. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 11., 22 ( 1990):  Pages 199 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1990.

66. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Vision of the Soul of Guy de Thurno
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/b4/Vision_d%27ame_1475.jpg/250px-Vision_d%27ame_1475.jpg
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67. Record Number: 31175
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Central Panel from the Humility Polyptych - Umilta and a lay patron
Source:
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68. Record Number: 31216
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Sarcophagus of Doña Berenguela (or Berengaria)
Source:
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69. Record Number: 31273
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Processional Cross
Source:
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70. Record Number: 34208
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Count Hugh I of Vaudemont embraces Aigeline of Burgundy
Source:
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71. Record Number: 36277
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Donor portraits of Margaret Blackburn and her husband Nicholas
Source:
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72. Record Number: 36351
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Queen Urraca
Source:
Year of Publication: