Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


  • Record Number: 8637
  • Author(s)/Creator(s): Connor , Carolyn L.
  • Contributor(s):
  • Title: Documents: The Epigram in the Church of Hagios Polyeuktos in Constantinople and Its Byzantine Response [the author argues that Anicia Juliana herself may have composed the seventy-six line epigram that was inscribed inside and outside her magnificent church; later building inscriptions as well as books reacted to her family pride, sumptuous descriptions, and learned rhetoric that was reflected in her influential encomium/dedication; the appendices include a transcription of the Greek epigram that was inscribed in Hagios Polyeuktos; an English translation of the epigram; the Greek epigrams that were inscribed in the church of Saint Euphemia, a church that Juliana refurbished; a transcription of the Greek epigram from the Vienna Dioscurides manuscript (cod. med. gr. 1, fol. 6 verso) which forms an acrostic on Juliana's name; a transcription of the Greek epigram on the frieze of the church of Saints Sergius and Bacchus built by Justin and Theodora shortly after Hagios Polyeuktos].
  • Source: Byzantion 69, 2 ( 1999): Pages 479 - 527.
  • Description:
  • Article Type: Journal Article
  • Subject (See Also): Anicia Juliana, Byzantine Princess Architecture- Religious Art History- General Byzantium Constantinople/Istanbul- Hagios Polyeuktos Epigraphy Greek Literature Laudatory Literature Lay Piety Literature- Verse Noble Women Patronage, Artistic Patronage, Ecc
  • Geographic Area: Eastern Mediterranean
  • Century: 6
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  • Primary Evidence:
  • Illustrations: Six figures. Figure One Schematic plan of Hagios Polyeuktos. Figure Two Carved peacock niche with part of the epigram inscribed. FIgure Three Carved peacock body from Hagios Polyeuktos. Figure Four Corner block of the entablature from Hagios Polyeuktos. Figure Five Manuscript illumination of Anicia Juliana flanked by female personifications (Vienna, Nationalbibliothek, cod. med. gr. 1, folio 6 verso). Figure Six Manuscript illumination of a peacock (Vienna, Nationalbibliothek, cod. med. gr. 1, folio 1 verso). The author theorizes that Juliana adopted the peacock as her personal emblem.
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  • Author's Affiliation: University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill
  • Conference Info: - , -
  • Year of Publication: 1999.
  • Language: English;Greek
  • ISSN/ISBN: 03782506
  • Material/Technique :
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