Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


37 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 39175
Author(s): Wei, John C.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Penitential Theology to the Canon Law of Magic
Source: Gratian the Theologian. John C. Wei .   Catholic University of America Press, 2016.  Pages 186 - 226.
Year of Publication: 2016.

2. Record Number: 32413
Author(s): Izbicki, Thomas M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Antoninus of Florence and the Dominican Witch Theorists
Source: Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 347 - 361.
Year of Publication: 2012.

3. Record Number: 14648
Author(s): Golinelli, Paolo.
Contributor(s):
Title : La fanciulla giusquiamo: Un rito medievale di propiziazione della pioggia tra storia e antropologia [Magical practices intended to control rain are found documented in canon law at least as early as the eleventh-century Corrector of Burchard of Worms. Some of these rites involved employment of a naked virgin. Churchmen tried to substitute pious practices for these rites, compromising opposition to "superstition" in order to meet the needs of their flocks. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chiesa, vita religiosa, societa nel Medioevo italiano: Studi offerti a Giuseppina De Sandre Gasparini.   Edited by Mariaclara Rossi and Gian Maria Varanini .   Herder, 2005. Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 415 - 427.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 13628
Author(s): Rider, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Between Theology and Popular Practice: Medieval Canonists on Magic and Impotence [The author argues that canon lawyers in the twelfth and thirteenth centuries created a set of rules to deal with impotence. Their writings indicate that they knew about lay magical practices. Some canonists urged those who were bewitched to seek magical cures. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Boundaries of the Law: Geography, Gender, and Jurisdiction in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Anthony Musson .   Ashgate, 2005. Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 53 - 66.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 10821
Author(s): Irvine, Martin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Priests, Prophets, and Magicians: Max Weber and Pierre Bourdieu vs. Hildegard of Bingen [The author investigates Hildegard's status as a prophet using Weber's ideal of priest, prophet, and magician as interpreted by Pierre Bourdieu. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 3 - 22.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 6612
Author(s): Walker, Alicia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Myth and Magic in Early Byzantine Marriage Jewelry: The Persistence of Pre-Christian Traditions [the author argues that early Byzantine marriage rings were intended to promote and protect marital harmony; "In contrast to the marriage belt from the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and the belt buckle from the Metropolitan Museum, Byzantine marriage rings do not express an overt association with pagan traditions. But, the resonance of their inscriptions with pagan magical texts may still indicate a perpetuation, on some level, of non-Christian practices and beliefs within the social context of Byzantine marriage." p. 69]
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 59 - 78.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 9339
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Feminization of Magic and the Emerging Idea of the Female Witch in the Late Middle Ages [This article explores Johannes Nider's text "Formicarius," written around 1437, and the first to state that women were more likely to be witches. Previously theologians had expressed concern over necromancy performed by learned men. However, women now posed a threat because their natures suited them to witchcraft, a feminized form of magic requiring sexual submission to the devil. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 120-134. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 6616
Author(s): Johnson, Geraldine A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beautiful Brides and Model Mothers: The Devotional and Talismanic Functions of Early Modern Marian Reliefs [The author discusses fifteenth century madonna and child reliefs in regard to their production, devotional uses, levels of contemplation evoked, and as magical objects for marriage and the procreation of male babies].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002.  Pages 135 - 161.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 5374
Author(s): Elsakkers, Marianne.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Pain You Shall Bear Children (Gen. 3:16): Medieval Prayers for a Safe Delivery [The author argues in part that the rhythms of the "Peperit" charm helped a pregnant woman adjust to the different stages of labor; the Appendix reproduces the texts of four versions of the "Peperit" charm].
Source: Women and Miracle Stories: A Multidisciplinary Exploration.   Edited by Anne-Marie Korte Studies in the History of Religions, 88.   Brill, 2001. Hispanic Review , 69., 3 (Summer 2001):  Pages 179 - 207.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 6052
Author(s): Bailey, Michael D.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Sorcery to Witchcraft: Clerical Conceptions of Magic in the Later Middle Ages
Source: Speculum , 76., 4 (October 2001):  Pages 960 - 990.
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 6632
Author(s): Skemer, Don C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Amulet Rolls and Female Devotion in the Late Middle Ages [medieval written amulets in scroll form rarely survive, but those that do frequently are intended to guarantee safety in pregnancy and childbirth; these amulets might be read aloud, bound to the woman or even fed to her; many of the surviving rolls are dedicated to Margaret of Antioch, the patron saint of pregnant women; this article edits one such roll (with the Latin text presented in the appendix) and provides a plate with a picture of the original; its mention of Saint Sigismund, a Burgundian martyr, may point to an origin in or near the ancient Burgundian realm; some of the charms are general ones, intended to provide generalized protection; but others make specific reference to childbirth, the greatest period of danger in many women's lives; other religious objects, including books of hours, were expected to serve similar protective purposes].
Source: Scriptorium , 55., 2 ( 2001):  Pages 197 - 227.
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 20897
Author(s): Brusegan, Rosanna
Contributor(s):
Title : Yseut e Richeut [Beroul and other writers about Tristan and Isolde knew the tales of Richeut, a courtesan who evolved into a devoted mother. Isolde is compared to Richeut when she shows her conniving and sensual side. Differences remained, including the causal role of magic in Isolde's relationship with Tristan compared to Richeut's use of magic merely to accomplish her ends. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medioevo Romanzo , 25., ( 2001):  Pages 284 - 300.
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 8667
Author(s): Samplonius, Kees.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sibylla borealis: Notes on the Structure of "Voluspá" [The author explores the figure of the "volva" in "Voluspá," an eddic poem. She is a seer who does magic and is modelled in part on the sibyl of antiquity, although there is some evidence for her earlier historical existence. The author argues that the volva's mixture of pagan and Christian elements is done deliberately to provide different levels of meaning for varied audiences. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Germanic Texts and Latin Models: Medieval Reconstructions.   Edited by K. E. Olsen, A. Harbus, and T. Hofstra .   Based on papers presented at an international conference held July 1-3, 1998 at the University of Groningen. Peeters, 2001. Medioevo Romanzo , 25., ( 2001):  Pages 185 - 229.
Year of Publication: 2001.

14. Record Number: 8493
Author(s): Cárdenas-Rotunno, Anthony J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rojas's Celestina and Claudina: In Search of a Witch [The author argues that Rojas never presents either Celestina or her teacher Claudina as witches. While Claudina was accused once as a witch, in the "Celestina" they use magic but have not renounced Christianity nor made pacts with the devil. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Hispanic Review , 69., 3 (Summer 2001):  Pages 277 - 297.
Year of Publication: 2001.

15. Record Number: 5716
Author(s): Maxwell-Stuart, P. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Emergence of the Christian Witch [The author briefly traces the development of ideas about witches from late Antiquity through the fifteenth century; aimed at a popular audience, there are no footnotes].
Source: History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 38 - 43.
Year of Publication: 2000.

16. Record Number: 6690
Author(s): Troncarelli, Fabio.
Contributor(s):
Title : Immagini di streghe nei manoscritti medievali [increased belief in witches in the late Middle Ages also involved more frequent illustration of them and their revels; lascivious human figures were combined with animal or demonic figures, often in orgiastic scenes; like Venus, lascivious witches were symbols of lust, in contrast to sacred love; satanic love magic was one of the crimes attributed to witches].
Source: Imaging Humanity/Immagini dell' umanità.   Edited by John Casey, Mary Warnement, Jim Whelton, and Anne Wingenter .   Bordighera, 2000. History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 79 - 92.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 4136
Author(s): Meek, Christine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men, Women, and Magic: Some Cases from Late Medieval Lucca
Source: Women in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Christine Meek .   Four Courts Press, 2000. Scriptorium , 55., 2 ( 2001):  Pages 43 - 66.
Year of Publication: 2000.

18. Record Number: 2975
Author(s): Park, Katharine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medicine and Magic: The Healing Arts [discusses a range of services from licensed doctors, informal healers, and priests].
Source: Gender and Society in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Judith C. Brown and Robert C. Davis .   Longman, 1998. History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 129 - 149.
Year of Publication: 1998.

19. Record Number: 1377
Author(s): Nenno, Nancy P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Between Magic and Medicine: Medieval Images of the Woman Healer [the figures of Queen Îsôt and Feimurgan demonstrate worries that women healers provoked: unregulated practices, superstition, use of magic, even dependence on demonic aid].
Source: Women Healers and Physicians: Climbing a Long Hill.   Edited by Lilian R. Furst .   University Press of Kentucky, 1997. History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 43 - 63.
Year of Publication: 1997.

20. Record Number: 3668
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Imaginative Conceptions in Renaissance Italy [The author argues that women were encouraged to fulfill their maternal role through a wide variety of images and objects that emphasized the delivery of healthy, male babies].
Source: Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.   Edited by Geraldine A. Johnson and Sara F. Mathews Grieco .   Cambridge University Press, 1997. History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 42 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1997.

21. Record Number: 9803
Author(s): Motz, Lotte.
Contributor(s):
Title : Note on a Bracteate from Trollhättan [The author identifies the object held by a female figure on a bracteate ( ) as a yarn winder. Motz argues that such a tool used in spinning and weaving was also used by women in magical practices to ensure prosperity for the coming year. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Collegium Medievale , 9., ( 1996):  Pages 153 - 155.
Year of Publication: 1996.

22. Record Number: 2343
Author(s): Hill, Thomas D.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Old English Dough Riddle and the Power of Women's Magic: The Traditional Context of Exeter Book Riddle No. 45
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

23. Record Number: 1586
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Concept of the Witches' Sabbath [analysis of four early texts from the 1430's ; the author argues that the witches' sabbath gained quick acceptance because it explained how common people could take command of a learned form of magic].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 2 (Fall 1996):  Pages 419 - 439.
Year of Publication: 1996.

24. Record Number: 590
Author(s): Weston, L. M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Medicine, Women's Magic: The Old English Metrical Childbirth Charms
Source: Modern Philology (Full Text via JSTOR) 92, 3 (February 1995): 279-293. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

25. Record Number: 1983
Author(s): Keil, Gundolf.
Contributor(s):
Title : Folter als Regeneration. Zur Logik von Hexerei im Mittelalter
Source: Mediaevistik , 8., ( 1995):  Pages 75 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 2123
Author(s): Goodich, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexuality, Family, and the Supernatural in the Fourteenth Century [the author looks at saints' miracles for evidence of familial problems involving illicit sexuality or violence; the supernatural comes into play both as the cause of the problem (temptaion by the devil, bewitching love potions, or evil magic) and its miraculous solution (the intervention of the saint or holy person following pious vows and prayers by family members)].
Source: Journal of the History of Sexuality , 4., 4 (April 1994):  Pages 493 - 516.
Year of Publication: 1994.

27. Record Number: 3464
Author(s): Valbuena, Olga Lucia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sorceresses, Love Magic, and the Inquisition of Linguistic Sorcery in "Celestina"
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (Full Text via JSTOR) 109, 2 (March 1994): 207-224. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

28. Record Number: 5958
Author(s): McMahon, James V.
Contributor(s):
Title : Valkyries, Midwives, Weavers, and Shape-Changers: Atli's Mother the Snake
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 66., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 475 - 487.
Year of Publication: 1994.

29. Record Number: 4632
Author(s): Carpenter, Dwayne E.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Sorcerer Defends the Virgin: Merlin in the "Cantigas de Santa Maria" [in "Cantiga 108" Merlin disputes the Incarnation with a Jew; the Virgin punishes the Jew by giving him a deformed son who serves as an instrument to convert many Jews].
Source: Bulletin of the Cantigueiros de Santa Maria , 5., (Spring 1993):  Pages 5 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1993.

30. Record Number: 10283
Author(s): Sayers, William.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexual Identity, Cultural Integrity, Verbal and Other Magic in Episodes from "Laxdoela saga" and "Kormáks saga" [The article examines several episodes from two sagas in order to show how threats of verbal magic, questionable sexual identity, and cultural permeability were conceptualized and tolerated in Icelandic society. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Arkiv för nordisk filologi , 107., ( 1992):  Pages 131 - 155.
Year of Publication: 1992.

31. Record Number: 11773
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Erotic Magic in Medieval Europe [The author argues that while medieval treatises on magic express a belief in the power of spells used to provoke and manipulate love and sex, medieval literature shows love as a force uncontrollable even by magic. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Sex in the Middle Ages: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Joyce E. Salisbury .   Garland Publishing, 1991. Arkiv för nordisk filologi , 107., ( 1992):  Pages 30 - 55.
Year of Publication: 1991.

32. Record Number: 11045
Author(s): Jochens, Jenny.
Contributor(s):
Title : Old Norse Magic and Gender: Þáttr Þorvalds ens Víðforla [The author studies fourteen scenes of the supernatural in Norse family sagas, and argues that, in thirteenth-century Scandinavia, men joined women in the exercise of pagan magic. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 63., 3 (Summer 1991):  Pages 305 - 317.
Year of Publication: 1991.

33. Record Number: 12743
Author(s): Keefer, Sarah Larratt.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Monastic Echo in an Old English Charm [The Old English metrical poem most commonly known as “Charm for Delayed Birth” is often interpreted as a magical incantation intended to protect a woman from a spontaneous miscarriage or stillbirth. Although the poem may have origins in pagan practices, the poem’s references to Bethlehem and the Nativity give it Christian relevance. Moreover, the poem repeatedly echoes monastic references to scripture and liturgy, giving the poem an oral quality that could serve a prayerful or devotional purpose instead of just being a pagan incantation with Christian terminology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 71 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1990.

34. Record Number: 31815
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Rune Stick with a Charm for the Protection of Kristina
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

35. Record Number: 31849
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Pendant Amulet in the Shape of a Woman, Possibly a Valkyrie
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

36. Record Number: 36961
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Scenes of Host Desecration
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

37. Record Number: 37630
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Hestia Polyolbos tapestry
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):
Year of Publication: