Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


176 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 27566
Author(s): Higley, Sarah
Contributor(s):
Title : Dressing up the Nuns: The “Lingua ignota” and Hildegard of Bingen’s Clothing [The author analyzes the words that Hildegard invented for women’s clothing in the “Lingua ignota.” The abbess placed an emphasis on hierarchy and order, marking the special status of virgins. Higley connects this to the crowns and floor-length veils worn by Hildegard’s nuns on feast days. The canoness Tenxwind wrote Hildegard complaining about this practice as immodest. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 93 - 109.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 20610
Author(s): Hough, Carole
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Law in Seventh-Century England [The author gives a close reading to sections concerning women from four sets of laws (from the Kentish kings AEthelberht I, Hlothhere and Eadric, and Wihtred, and King Ine from Wessex). She concludes in part that the codes take care to specify women's rights and duties. Title note provided by Feminae.].
Source: Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 207 - 230.
Year of Publication: 2007.

3. Record Number: 20609
Author(s): Carroll, Jayne and Christina Lee
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Anglo-Saxon England and the Impact of Christine Fell - In troduction [In this brief article the authors explore Christine Fell's scholarship and her influence on women's studies in connection with Anglo-Saxon England. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 201 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2007.

4. Record Number: 20611
Author(s): Klinck, Anne L
Contributor(s):
Title : To have and to hold: The Bridewealth of Wives and the "Mund" of Widows in Anglo-Saxon England [The author examine women's status, particularly brides and widows, and the control that men exercised over them. Klinck brings in Anglo-Saxon vocabulary from legal sources as evidence. She also considers recent historiographic developments. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 231 - 245.
Year of Publication: 2007.

5. Record Number: 20336
Author(s): Bertini Malgiarini, Patrizia and Ugo Vignuzzi
Contributor(s):
Title : Matilde a Helfta, Melchiade in Umbria (e oltre): un antico volgarizzamento umbro del "Liber specialis gratiae" [Mechthild von Hackeborn's "Liber specialis gratiae" was translated into Italian in the 15th or 16th century. It probably was made for nuns. The translation renames Mechthild "Melchiadis," as do other non-German versions. The appendix provides a compariso
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 291 - 307.
Year of Publication: 2006.

6. Record Number: 20330
Author(s): Pozzi, Giovanni
Contributor(s):
Title : Il linguaggio della scrittura mistica: Santa Caterina [Medieval mystics tried expressing their experiences in various forms, including autobiography, narrative, and metaphysical discourse. Women mystics frequently employed autobiography, a diary or personal letters. Catherine of Siena dictated prayers, lette
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 3 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2006.

7. Record Number: 20331
Author(s): Librandi, Rita
Contributor(s):
Title : Dal lessico della "Lettere" di Santa Caterina da Siena: La concretezza della fusione [Catherine of Siena used prophetic language in her letters. Although we lack a critical edition, the vocabulary of the letters can be studied for its use of metaphor. Her emphasis on images of spiritual feeding contrasts vividly with her extreme fasting i
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 19 - 40.
Year of Publication: 2006.

8. Record Number: 20332
Author(s): Santi, Francesco
Contributor(s):
Title : La scrittura nella scrittura di Caterina da Siena [The later Middle Ages saw an abandonment of confidence in language by intellectuals, with a related decline in exegesis of the Bible. Catherine of Siena used passages from the Bible, but she frequently used only a single phrase instead of full quotations
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 41 - 69.
Year of Publication: 2006.

9. Record Number: 20333
Author(s): Leonardi, Lino
Contributor(s):
Title : Il problema testuale dell'epistolario Cateriniano [Catherine of Siena dictated her letters, and her oral language is reflected in the surviving texts. Modern editions too easily iron out the evidence of orality. The surviving manuscript traditions reflect the work of different secretaries and hagiographe
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 71 - 90.
Year of Publication: 2006.

10. Record Number: 20334
Author(s): Frosini, Giovanna
Contributor(s):
Title : Lingua e testo nel manoscritto Viennese delle letter di Caterina [Each collection of the letters of Catherine of Siena bears witness not just to the saint but to her secretaries and the compilers of individual manuscripts. The Vienna MS [ONB 3514] derives from the monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore. It brings together
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 91 - 125.
Year of Publication: 2006.

11. Record Number: 20337
Author(s): Trifone, Pietro
Contributor(s):
Title : Gli ingegnosi caprici di un linguaiolo: appunti sul "Vocabolario cateriniano" di Girolamo Gigli [Girolamo Gigli (d. 1722) composed his "Vocabolario cateriniano" as a part of a campaign against the Florentine domination of accepted Italian style. Gigli used passages from the saint's writings to illustrate local Sienese usages he wished to defend. The
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 189 - 203.
Year of Publication: 2006.

12. Record Number: 20339
Author(s): Ricci, Alessio
Contributor(s):
Title : Recorsivita e semplicita delle "visioni" di Francesca Romana: su alcuni aspetti sintattici e testuali del discorso mistico [The Latin translation of Giovanni Mattioti's collection of evidence for the sanctity of Frances of Rome leaves out the flavor of the Italian original. The iconography of Frances' visions is described, but some of her less tactful remarks also are exclude
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Nottingham Medieval Studies , 51., ( 2007):  Pages 231 - 255.
Year of Publication: 2006.

13. Record Number: 14649
Author(s): Rando, Daniela.
Contributor(s):
Title : Libri e letture per la vita eremetica: un esempio al femminile dal Veneto [Pious women from Venice occasionally became hermits near Treviso. We can trace some of their reading through the will of Caterina Centania, who founded the Hieronymites of Santa Maria della Rocca and left books to the prior of a monastery near Treviso. Included among these vernacular works of piety are texts in Italian, including in the regional dialect. Some are translations of well-known devotional texts, including pious poetry and Marian texts. The article appendix presents the will of Caterina Centania (1467). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chiesa, vita religiosa, societa nel Medioevo italiano: Studi offerti a Giuseppina De Sandre Gasparini.   Edited by Mariaclara Rossi and Gian Maria Varanini .   Herder, 2005. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 539 - 553.
Year of Publication: 2005.

14. Record Number: 14568
Author(s): Green, Jonathan P.
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Gloss on Hildegard of Bingen's "Lingua Ignota"
Source: Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 217 - 234.
Year of Publication: 2005.

15. Record Number: 14698
Author(s): Luongo, F. Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saintly Authorship in the Italian Renaissance: The Quattrocento Reception of Catherine of Siena's Letters [The author argues that fifteenth century readers saw Catherine's letters as an important source of moral guidance. Furthermore their being written in the Italian vernacular was not a detraction. Catherine's mysticism conveyed authority as surely as Latin and Greek did for the classics. These trends crystalize in the edition of Catherine's letters printed by Aldus Manutius in 1500. He combines spiritual and literary goals with a new typeface for the saint's inspired vernacular. [Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 8., ( 2005):  Pages 1 - 46.
Year of Publication: 2005.

16. Record Number: 20781
Author(s): Kovacs, Lenke
Contributor(s):
Title : The Staging of the "Ludus de assumptione beatae Mariae virginis" (cod. 960, University Library, Innsbruck) [Describes the variations of stage settings and performance venues used for Assumption plays, emphasizing how practical concerns (such as needing to silence the audience) were incorporated into play scripts. Examines the relationship between the Virgin Mary and the Bride in the Song of Songs, and the depiction of Jews and Jerusalem. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 25 - 34.
Year of Publication: 2005.

17. Record Number: 10826
Author(s): Simons, Walter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Staining the Speech of Things Divine: The Uses of Literacy in Medieval Beguine Communities [The author examines different kinds of evidence including vernacular texts written by Beguines, wills that bequeathed manuscripts to or from Beguines, and daily activities of Beguines involving the written word. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 85 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2004.

18. Record Number: 10827
Author(s): Hemptinne, Thérèse.de
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading, Writing, and Devotional Practices: Lay and Religious Women and the Written Word in the Low Countries (1350-1550) [The author argues in part that manuscripts in the vernacular served as a means of connection among female relatives and friends, both urban laywomen and those in religious life (Beguines as well as nuns). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 111 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2004.

19. Record Number: 10828
Author(s): Desplenter, Youri.
Contributor(s):
Title : Songs of Praise for the "Illiterate": Latin Hymns in Middle Dutch Prose Translation [The author focuses on a group of manuscripts which provide vernacular translations of breviary hymns. Desplenter argues that the manuscripts' intended users were mostly women, both Franciscan tertiaries and canonesses of the Windesheim Chapter. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 127 - 142.
Year of Publication: 2004.

20. Record Number: 11427
Author(s): Parker, Holt N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Humanism: Nine Factors for the Woman Learning
Source: Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 581 - 616.
Year of Publication: 2004.

21. Record Number: 14637
Author(s): Fleck, Cathleen A
Contributor(s):
Title : To exercise yourself in these things by continued contemplation: Visual and Textual Literacy in the Frescoes at Santa Maria Donna Regina [The author argues that the Donna Regina fresco program was planned to enhance the resident nuns' understanding and meditation on the tenets of the faith. Furthermore many of the nuns would have had a visual literacy as well as a textual literacy to understand the sophisticated iconography and the Latin inscriptions. The nuns also would need to summon up relevant Biblical texts and other readings from memory. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 109 - 128.
Year of Publication: 2004.

22. Record Number: 11094
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse, Religious Reform and the Late Middle Ages [The author examines later Middle English texts that borrowed heavily from the "Ancrene Wisse." For the most part their authors were interested in adapting the anchoritic life for devout lay men and women. In some cases the texts have a pronounced puritan streak. The "Ancrene Wisse's" theme of living a life of perfection appealed to many reformist authors in fourteenth century England. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 197 - 226.
Year of Publication: 2003.

23. Record Number: 10906
Author(s): Hamilton, Tracy Chapman.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queenship and Kinship in the French "Bible moralisée": The Example of Blanche of Castile and Vienna ÖNB 2554 [The author argues that the manuscript was commissioned by Blanche possibly during the early period of her regency. The repeated images of childbirth and Sainte Église in the illuminations emphasize Blanche's particular rights as mother and authorized regent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 177 - 208.
Year of Publication: 2003.

24. Record Number: 11087
Author(s): Dance, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : The AB Language: The Recluse, the Gossip, and the Language Historian [The AB language is the dialect of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the "Katherine Group." It came from the Herefordshire/Shropshire area. In style and vocabulary it combines the homespun with the learned. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 57 - 82.
Year of Publication: 2003.

25. Record Number: 9637
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : This Living Hand: Thirteenth-Century Female Literacy, Materialist Immanence, and the Reader of the "Ancrene Wisse" [The author first surveys the manuscripts of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the languages that early readers would have used. Then she analyzes the broadly historical context of thirteenth century female religious readers. In the final section, Robertson focuses
Source: Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 1 - 36. Abridged version published in Medieval Literature: Criticism and Debates. Edited by Holly A. Crocker and D. Vance Smith. Routledge, 2014. Pages 162-179.
Year of Publication: 2003.

26. Record Number: 11089
Author(s): Trotter, D. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anglo-French Lexis of "Ancrene Wisse": A Re-evaluation [The author argues that the text of the "Ancrene Wisse" demonstrates at a very early period a high number of Anglo-French loan words as well as the combination of Anglo-French morphemes, e.g. turpelnesse (Anglo-French stem with Middle English verb ending). This familiarity shows the depth of language contact in England at the beginning of the thirteenth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 83 - 101.
Year of Publication: 2003.

27. Record Number: 9675
Author(s): Niles, John D.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Problem of the Ending of "The Wife's Lament" [The author argues that the closing section of the "Wife's Lament" (lines 42-52a) has been misread. It is not a tender lament from a separated lover. Instead it is an angry curse directed at the husband who abandoned her. Niles suggests that modern gender assumptions prevented critics from recognizing the anger, vengeance, and other strong emotions expressed by the female speaker. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 78., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 1107 - 1150.
Year of Publication: 2003.

28. Record Number: 6635
Author(s): Warren, Ann K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virginal Effects: Text and Identity in "Ancrene Wisse" [The author argues that the anchoritic construction of virginity is mainly dependent on language which makes visible an "inner" core].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002. Speculum , 78., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 36 - 48.
Year of Publication: 2002.

29. Record Number: 9510
Author(s): Walters, Lori J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Royal Vernacular: Poet and Patron in Christine de Pizan's "Charles V" and the "Sept Psaumes Allégorisés [The author argues that Christine speaks as a female Evangelist, substituting Middle French for Biblical Hebrew. Christine does much to affirm the sanctity and authority of Middle French. Walters also underlines the serious political issues addressed in b
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. Speculum , 78., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 145 - 182.
Year of Publication: 2002.

30. Record Number: 9508
Author(s): Powell, Morgan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Translating Scripture for "Ma Dame de Champagne": The Old French "Paraphrase" of Psalm 44 ("Eructavit") [The author analyzes the Old French translation of Psalm Forty-Four made for Marie de Champagne. The poet sets his wedding song for Christ and his bride, Holy Church, within the context of the secular court which is seen as the equivalent of heaven. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. Speculum , 78., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 83 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2002.

31. Record Number: 8680
Author(s): Poe, Elizabeth W.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cantairitz e Trobairitz: A Forgotten Attestation of Old Provençal "Trobairitz" [The author points out another instance of the word "troibairitz," appearing in Terramagnino da Pisa's Occitan grammar, the "Doctrina d'Acort." There it clearly means "poetess" and is presented as the female equivalent of "trobador." The author argues that the word was known to Terramagnino, and he must have seen it in one of his Occitan source texts which is now lost. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanische Forschungen , 114., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 206 - 215.
Year of Publication: 2002.

32. Record Number: 9511
Author(s): Wiberg Pedersen, Else Marie
Contributor(s):
Title : Can God Speak in the Vernacular? On Beatrice of Nazareth's Flemish Exposition of the Love for God [The author examines the "Seven manieren van heiliger Minnen," a vernacular text written by Beatrice, a prioress of the Cistercian convent of Nazareth in present day Belgium near Antwerp. Wiberg Pedersen also looks at Beatrice's "vita," written in Latin by an unknown monk. The monk also translated her "Seven manieren" text into Latin for inclusion with the "vita." Wiberg Pedersen argues that the Church was frequently uncomfortable with women who wrote theological texts, particularly in the vernacular. Nevertheless Beatrice and other "mulieres religiosae" found various orthodox outlets for their writings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. Romanische Forschungen , 114., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 185 - 208.
Year of Publication: 2002.

33. Record Number: 9331
Author(s): Monahan, Jennifer.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Matilda: The Self-Fashioning of a Duchess [The author examines how Matilda, Countess of Tuscany, identified herself in documents in order to understand what kind of image she fashioned for herself as a female ruler. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 1-13. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

34. Record Number: 410
Author(s): Gilkison, Jean.
Contributor(s):
Title : Language and Gender in Diego de San Pedro's "Cárcel de Amor"
Source: Journal of Hispanic Research , 3., ( 2002):  Pages 113 - 124.
Year of Publication: 2002.

35. Record Number: 5963
Author(s): Barrett, Jeanelle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sticks and Stones: The Conflict Between Language and Sexism in Chaucer's Humor
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Journal of Hispanic Research , 3., ( 2002): Conference website.
Year of Publication: 2001.

36. Record Number: 6166
Author(s): Bammesberger, Alfred.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Meaning of Old English "Eowend(e)"
Source: Notes and Queries , 4 (December 2001):  Pages 371 - 372.
Year of Publication: 2001.

37. Record Number: 11164
Author(s): Kornexl, Lucia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Word Formation, Sex, and Gender in Old English: An Intimate Relationship?
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference Paper presented at the Tenth Biennial Meeting of the International Society of Anglo-Saxonists, University of Helsinki, August 6-11, 2001, "Anglo-Saxons and the North
Year of Publication: 2001.

38. Record Number: 4876
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Obstetrical and Gynecological Texts in Middle English [The author complies a list of Middle English manuscripts that contain different texts on childbirth, women’s health, sexuality, and cosmetics. Some of the manuscripts also contain medicinal and culinary recipes. Many of the medical complications are attributed to the female healer Trota (or Trotula) of Salerno, but others are attributed to male authors like Galen and Hippocrates. Although the Trotula texts were popular in late medieval England, the manuscripts indicate that the most widely disseminated medical text was “The Sekeness of Wymmen” by Gilbertus Anglicus. The textual and codicological evidence of these manuscripts suggests that both men and women (and both physicians and laypersons) possessed and read these texts. The author describes each manuscript and lists its contents, and the appendix transcribes a new manuscript (the Middle English "Nature of Wommen") that has never been described. Originally published in Studies in the Age of Chaucer 14 (1992): 53-88. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: 2000. Magistra , 6., 2 (Winter 2000): Originally published in Studies in the Age of Chaucer 14 (1992): 53-88.
Year of Publication: 2000.

39. Record Number: 5010
Author(s): Buck, R. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Language in the Anglo-Saxon Leechbooks
Source: Women and Language , 23., 2 (Fall 2000):  Pages 41 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2000.

40. Record Number: 5455
Author(s): Renevey, Denis.
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction--Female Vernacular Theology [defined by the authors as "this subcategory embodies religious works either written and performed by women, written for women, and/or, to a lesser degree, representing women." (Page 5).].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000. Women and Language , 23., 2 (Fall 2000):  Pages 1 - 5.
Year of Publication: 2000.

41. Record Number: 4883
Author(s): Cornish, Alison.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Lady Asks: The Gender of Vulgarization in Late Medieval Italy
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (Full Text via JSTOR) 115, 2 (March 2000): 166-180. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2000.

42. Record Number: 5454
Author(s): Salamone, Nadia Cannata.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Making of the Italian Literary Canon [The author explores women's roles as the audience for literature in the vernacular written in courtly circles].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000.  Pages 498 - 512.
Year of Publication: 2000.

43. Record Number: 10127
Author(s): Lindley, Carrie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wundenlocc and "Hupseax": Gender Expression and Transgression in the Old English "Judith"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Session 537: "Old English Poetry III."
Year of Publication: 2000.

44. Record Number: 4840
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Infancy and Education in the Writings of Gertrud the Great of Helfta
Source: Magistra , 6., 2 (Winter 2000):  Pages 5 - 30.
Year of Publication: 2000.

45. Record Number: 4332
Author(s): Elsakkers, Marianne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Raptus ultra Rhenum: Early Ninth-Century Saxon Laws on Abduction and Rape [The author consults four law codes: "Leges Saxonum," "Lex Chamavorum," "Lex Frisionum," and "Lex Thuringorum."
Source: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik , 52., ( 1999):  Pages 27 - 53.
Year of Publication: 1999.

46. Record Number: 4681
Author(s): Sayers, William.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'ancien judéo-français étupé "ayant un prépuce, incirconcis": glose-biblique- et insulte religieuse? [The author analyzes a Jewish-French word, étupé (literally plugged, blocked, in this case uncircumsised) used in Biblical glosses to refer to the non-Jewish, probably indicating disdain].
Source: Zeitschrift für Romanische Philologie , 115., ( 1999):  Pages 234 - 243.
Year of Publication: 1999.

47. Record Number: 4686
Author(s): Marchand, James W.
Contributor(s):
Title : Quoniam, Wife of Bath's Prologue D. 608 [The author cites several humorous uses of "quoniam" for vagina in Latin, French, Spanish, and Provençal texts].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 100., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 43 - 49.
Year of Publication: 1999.

48. Record Number: 4388
Author(s): Lacey, Antonia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Language and the Mystic Voice: Reading from Luce Irigaray to Catherine of Siena [The author applies the symbolic and semiotic language theories of Irigaray to the writings of Catherine of Siena; the author argues that Catherine found her authority in a self-affirming relationship with Christ].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 100., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 329 - 342.
Year of Publication: 1999.

49. Record Number: 5297
Author(s): Jacobs, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Extra-Marital Contracts in the "Canterbury Tales" [The author argues that Chaucer's lovers delay consummation and pledge a contractual, legalistic promise to one another in imitation of marriage and courtship practices].
Source: Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 6., ( 1999):  Pages 25 - 33.
Year of Publication: 1999.

50. Record Number: 3993
Author(s): Hough, Carole.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Widow's "Mund" in AEthelberht 75 and 76 [The author argues that the text refers to the protection that widows were able to extend to their household and dependants.]
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 98., 1 (January 1999):  Pages 1 - 16.
Year of Publication: 1999.

51. Record Number: 3537
Author(s): Müller, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : How To Do Things with Mystical Language: Marguerite d'Oingt's Performative Writing
Source: Performance and Transformation: New Approaches to Late Medieval Spirituality.   Edited by Mary A. Suydam and Joanna E. Ziegler .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 98., 1 (January 1999):  Pages 27 - 45.
Year of Publication: 1999.

52. Record Number: 11864
Author(s): Dutton, Marsha L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's Two Nuns [The author argues that Chaucer presents the Second Nun as a positive figure in contrast to the Prioress who is verbally and intellectually incompetent. The Prioress mistranslates Latin and tells a tale of vengeance that subordinates Christ to both Mary and the martyrs. The Second Nun instead emphasizes God's love and grace. Her Saint Cecilia is not an innocent victim because she chooses to follow Christ, knowing that the risks are worth eternal life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Monasteries and society in medieval Britain: proceedings of the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by Benjamin Thompson Harlaxton medieval studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1999. JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 98., 1 (January 1999):  Pages 296 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1999.

53. Record Number: 4753
Author(s): Kemp, Theresa D.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Lingua Materna" and the Conflict Over Vernacular Religious Discourse in Fifteenth-Century England [the author examines varied clerical writings that react to or make use of the vernacular; each text "depicts the struggle over who should have access to religious discourse as a gendered contest between a potentially transgressive vernacular, feminized as the 'Lingua Materna,' or 'the mother tongue,' and the authoritative Latin of the male-dominated Church"; clerics who used the vernacular to teach the laity had to distinguish between good uses that they masculinized and bad uses, such as demystifying theology, which they saw as a feminization].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 78., 3 (Summer 1999):  Pages 233 - 257.
Year of Publication: 1999.

54. Record Number: 3957
Author(s): Migiel, Marilyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Encrypted Messages: Men, Women, and Figurative Language in "Decameron" 5.4 [The author argues that the deeper message of the story concerns the consolidation of male power and the upholding of patriarchal values.]
Source: Philological Quarterly , 77., 1 (Winter 1998):  Pages 1 - 13.
Year of Publication: 1998.

55. Record Number: 4287
Author(s): Rapp, Beverlee Sian.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman Speaks: Language and Self-Representation in Hildegard's Letters [The author suggests that Hildegard adopts a comforting motherly tone when writing to women, while she has a variety of approaches to men: supplicatory, humble yet confident, and bold as the mouthpiece of God].
Source: Hildegard of Bingen: A book of Essays.   Edited by Maud Burnett McInerney .   Garland Publishing, 1998. Zeitschrift für Romanische Philologie , 115., ( 1999):  Pages 3 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1998.

56. Record Number: 3525
Author(s): Ferrante, Joan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Scribe quae vides et audis: Hildegard, Her Language, and Her Secretaries [The author suggests that Guibert, Hildegard's last secretary, had her permission to embellish her texts with ornate rhetoric while all her earlier scribes had confined themselves to making corrections].
Source: The Tongue of the Fathers: Gender and Ideology in Twelfth-Century Latin.   Edited by David Townsend and Andrew Taylor .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. Zeitschrift für Romanische Philologie , 115., ( 1999):  Pages 102 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1998.

57. Record Number: 4478
Author(s): Fenster, Thelma.
Contributor(s):
Title : Perdre son latin: Christine de Pizan and Vernacular Humanism [The author suggests that rather than argue over Christine's command of Latin, scholars should recognize the contributions she made to French prose].
Source: Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference.   Edited by Marilynn Desmond .   University of Minnesota Press, 1998. Zeitschrift für Romanische Philologie , 115., ( 1999):  Pages 91 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1998.

58. Record Number: 3402
Author(s): Cantavella, Rosanna.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Meaning of "Destral" as Go-Between in the Catalan "Facet" and in Old Occitan [in its advice on seduction the text tells the would-be lover to choose a commoner woman as his go-between].
Source: Medium Aevum , 67., 2 ( 1998):  Pages 304 - 312.
Year of Publication: 1998.

59. Record Number: 3349
Author(s): Hough, Carole.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife's Lament Line 15B and "Daniel" Line 499B: Two Notes on Place-Name Evidence [The author proposes an alternate reading for "her heard," "her"- here and "heard" - hard or harsh].
Source: English Language Notes , 35., 4 (June 1998):  Pages 1 - 4.
Year of Publication: 1998.

60. Record Number: 3465
Author(s): Warren, Nancy B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saving the Market: Textual Strategies and Cultural Transformations in Fifteenth Century Translations of the Benedictine Rule for Women [The author argues that the translations/adaptations work to set up a hierarchical sex/gender system in which the female is constrained and Latin is privileged over the vernacular].
Source: Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 3., ( 1998):  Pages 34 - 50. Translation, Transformation, and Transubstantiation in the Late Middle Ages
Year of Publication: 1998.

61. Record Number: 5435
Author(s): Bishop, Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dame Study and Women's Literacy ["Langland's poem negotiates the discourse of reading, recognizing the competition between the accepted female discursive mode and the call to social activism: 'Piers Plowman' embodies that competition in the figure of Study. As wife of Wit, Study dramatizes the competition for a reader's conscience, and traces in her disquisition the readerly paths to the heart. The one thing that recuperates the social experience of reading is its communal and sensual component: texts are read, heard, and felt. Study's emphasis on charity reveals a bold, feminized component of the discourse of social activism as antidote, if you will, to the constructed female reader of texts of affective piety." (Page 112)].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 97 - 115.
Year of Publication: 1998.

62. Record Number: 8496
Author(s): Sutherland, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Elizabeth Elstob (1683-1756) [A biographical sketch of the woman scholar who published critical editions of major Old English texts and produced the first Old English grammar. When her brother died, Elstob fell into obscurity and poverty but was rescued in later life by a network of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Scholarship: Biographical Studies on the Formation of a Discipline. Volume 2: Literature and Philology.   Edited by Helen Damico with Donald Fennema and Karmen Lenz Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, 1350.   Garland Publishing, 1998. Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 59 - 73.
Year of Publication: 1998.

63. Record Number: 3498
Author(s): Mintz, Susannah B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Words Devilish and Divine: Eve as Speaker in Genesis B
Source: Neophilologus , 81., 4 (October 1997):  Pages 609 - 623.
Year of Publication: 1997.

64. Record Number: 2267
Author(s): Ehrenschwendtner, Marie Luise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Puellae litteratae: The Use of the Vernacular in the Dominican Convents of Southern Germany
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997. Neophilologus , 81., 4 (October 1997):  Pages 49 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1997.

65. Record Number: 2958
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Handlist of Latin and Vernacular Manuscripts of the So-Called "Trotula" Texts. Part II: The Vernacular Translations and Latin Re-Writings [describes in detail all twenty-four known medieval vernacular translations or Latin re-writings of the Trotula texts; identifies three translations into Dutch, five into English, seven into French, three into German, one into Hebrew, one into Irish, two into Italian plus one Latin prose rendition and one Latin verse rendition; includes information on editions of these texts where available].
Source: Scriptorium , 51., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 80 - 104.
Year of Publication: 1997.

66. Record Number: 3300
Author(s): Eisermann, Falk.
Contributor(s):
Title : Diversae et plurimae materiae in diversis capitulis: Der "Stimulus amoris" als literarisches Dokument der normativen Zentrierung
Source: Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 31., ( 1997):  Pages 214 - 232.
Year of Publication: 1997.

67. Record Number: 3510
Author(s): Bradley, Ritamary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Julian of Norwich: Everyone's Mystic
Source: Mysticism and Spirituality in Medieval England.   Edited by William F. Pollard and Robert Boenig .   D.S. Brewer, 1997. Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 31., ( 1997):  Pages 139 - 158.
Year of Publication: 1997.

68. Record Number: 2786
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Feminized Cross of "The Dream of the Rood" [interprets Christ as an aggressively heterosexual male figure whose heroism, masculinity, and majesty dominate the cross as the feminized other].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 76., 1 (Winter 1997):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1997.

69. Record Number: 2787
Author(s): Rulon-Miller, Nina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cynewulf and Cyneheard: A Woman Screams [when the king Cynewulf was visiting a woman's bower in Merton for sex he was ambushed by Cyneheard; the author analyzes the story of the incident as reported in the Anglo Saxon Chronicle with an emphasis on the woman of Merton].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 76., 2 (Spring 1997):  Pages 113 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1997.

70. Record Number: 2361
Author(s): Hough, Carole.
Contributor(s):
Title : Aelfred's "Domboc" and the Language of Rape: A Reconsideration of Alfred Ch. 11 [argues that women were entitled to receive compensation in their own right for sexual assaults and thus enjoyed a degree of legal autonomy].
Source: Medium Aevum , 66., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 1 - 27.
Year of Publication: 1997.

71. Record Number: 2733
Author(s): Hough, Carole.
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Reading of Alfred, ch. 26 [it concerns compensation for the rape of underage girls which the author suggests was the same as that owed for raping women who were past child-bearing age].
Source: Nottingham Medieval Studies , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 1 - 12.
Year of Publication: 1997.

72. Record Number: 2069
Author(s): Oosterwijk, Sophie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Of Mops and Puppets: The Ambiguous Use of the Word "Mop" in the "Towneley Shepherd's Plays" ["mop" meant both "baby" and "doll" or "puppet" and the author suggests that there was a deliberate play on both meanings].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1997):  Pages 169 - 171.
Year of Publication: 1997.

73. Record Number: 2578
Author(s): Lawson, Richard H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Prominent Linguistic Characteristics of Brother Hermann's "Leben der Gräfin Iolande von Vianden"
Source: American Journal of Germanic Linguistics and Literatures , 9., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 73 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1997.

74. Record Number: 2034
Author(s): Gwara, Scott.
Contributor(s):
Title : Further Old English Scratched Glosses and Merographs from Corpus Christi College, Cambridge MS 326 (Aldhelm's "Prosa de Virginitate") [includes an edition of the scratched glosses].
Source: English Studies , 78., 3 (May 1997):  Pages 201 - 236.
Year of Publication: 1997.

75. Record Number: 1565
Author(s): Tarvers, Josephine K.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Alleged Illiteracy of Margery Kempe: A Reconsideration of the Evidence
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 11., ( 1996):  Pages 113 - 124. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Annual Conference of the Southeastern Medieval Association
Year of Publication: 1996.

76. Record Number: 820
Author(s): Chavasse, Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Latin Lay Piety and Vernacular Lay Piety in Word and Image: Venice, 1471- Early 1500s [devotion to the Virgin Mary].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 3 (Sept. 1996):  Pages 319 - 342.
Year of Publication: 1996.

77. Record Number: 888
Author(s): Zeitler, Barbara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Urbs Felix Dotata Populo Trilingui: Some Thoughts about a Twelfth- Century Funerary Memorial From Palermo [the epitaph of Anna, mother of the cleric Grisandus, is recorded in Latin, Greek, Arabic, and Arabic written in Hebrew characters to address the various religious and cultural groups in Sicily].
Source: Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 2., 2 (Aug. 1996):  Pages 114 - 139.
Year of Publication: 1996.

78. Record Number: 1058
Author(s): Lucchesi, Enzo.
Contributor(s):
Title : D' une vie de Marie à une homélie sur la Passion
Source: Analecta Bollandiana , 114., 40241 ( 1996):  Pages 269 - 272.
Year of Publication: 1996.

79. Record Number: 714
Author(s): McGinn, Bernard.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Changing Shape of Late Medieval Mysticism [themes discussed include connections between men and women in religion, Latin and the vernaculars, and the world and the cloister].
Source: Church History (Full Text via JSTOR) 65, 2 (June 1996): 197-219. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

80. Record Number: 2352
Author(s): Rulon-Miller, Nina.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman Screams: A Feminist's Introduction to Old English [suggests ways in which to make Anglo-Saxon studies more welcoming to female students].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

81. Record Number: 1820
Author(s): Bitterling, Klaus.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe, an English "Sterte" in Germany [argues that "Sterte" in the "Book of Margery Kempe," long-thought to be Middle English for "tail," is Low German meaning "vagabond" or "beggar"].
Source: Notes and Queries , 1 (March 1996):  Pages 21 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1996.

82. Record Number: 1434
Author(s): Vesce, Thomas E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Light Leaps in "Ancrene Wisse" VI: "Wid Lihtleapes Buggen Eche Blisse"? [the anchoress is enjoined to avoid the leap into lechery and pride, like the leaps of Eve and Lucifer, but instead imitate the leaps of Christ].
Source: Mediaevalia , 19., ( 1996):  Pages 385 - 403. (1996 (for 1993)) Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1996.

83. Record Number: 702
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Listen Now All and Understand: Adaptation of Hagiographical Material for Vernacular Audiences in the Old English Lives of St. Margaret [contrasts a straightforward narrative with a version that emphasizes an affective spirituality].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 71, 1 (Jan. 1996): 27-42. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

84. Record Number: 1584
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Don't Ask, Don't Tell: The Wife of Bath and Vernacular Translations [the Wife of Bath's "Prologue" amd "Tale" promote the status of the vernacular and acknowledge the role female audiences play in the translations of "authoritative" texts like Trotula].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 97 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1996.

85. Record Number: 1071
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Middle Cornish Interlude: Genre and Tradition [discusses the speaking part of the matchmaker in a secular interlude that was written on the back of a final contract; the matchmaker persuades a man to take a wife but then advises the young woman to exert control over her husband from the start].
Source: Comparative Drama , 30., 2 (Summer 1996):  Pages 266 - 281.
Year of Publication: 1996.

86. Record Number: 3636
Author(s): De Gendt, Anne Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mors et Vita in Manu Linguae : Paroles Dévastatrices et Lénifiantes dans "Le Livre du chevalier de la Tour Landry" [the author examines the Chevalier's attitude toward women's language both what they should emulate(measured, courteous, and humble speech) and what they should avoid (flattery, lying, and deceit) ; the author argues that in comparison to other authors, the Chevalier is rather mild in his criticisms].
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 58., ( 1996):  Pages 351 - 363.
Year of Publication: 1996.

87. Record Number: 1582
Author(s): Marvin, Corey J.
Contributor(s):
Title : I Will Thee Not Forsake: The Kristevan Maternal Space in Chaucer's "Prioress's Tale" and John of Garland's "Stella maris"
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 35 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1996.

88. Record Number: 1110
Author(s): Fee, Christopher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beag and Beaghroden: Women, Treasure, and the Language of Social Structure in "Beowulf"
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 97., 3 ( 1996):  Pages 285 - 294.
Year of Publication: 1996.

89. Record Number: 1667
Author(s): Pickens, Rupert T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France's Bestiary: Acculturation in the Anglo-Norman Court [International Courtly Literature Society. Eighth Triennial Congress. Queen's University of Belfast, July- August 1995].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 8 - 9.
Year of Publication: 1996.

90. Record Number: 813
Author(s): Clough, Cecil H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Daughters and Wives of the Montefeltro: Outstanding Bluestockings of the Quattrocento [discusses their learning, roles in public life, and Christian devotion].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 1 (March 1996):  Pages 31 - 55.
Year of Publication: 1996.

91. Record Number: 1111
Author(s): Curzan, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Third Person Pronouns in the "Peterborough Chronicle" [includes material on the development of the feminine pronouns; the "Peterborough Chronicle" contains the first recorded use of "scae" (she)].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 97., 3 ( 1996):  Pages 301 - 314.
Year of Publication: 1996.

92. Record Number: 1671
Author(s): Amer, Sahar
Contributor(s):
Title : Meaning at the Juncture of Text and Manuscript: The Case of Marie de France's Fables [1995 Convention of the Modern Language Association. Chicago, December 26-30, 1995].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 12 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1996.

93. Record Number: 9517
Author(s): Cox, Catherine S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Jangler's "Bourde": Gender, Renunciation, and Chaucer's Manciple [The author argues that the Manciple speaks in his mother's voice to emphasize anti-feminist themes. The kinds of indirect language used by the Manciple fit in with the "Parson's Tale" and the "Retractions," suggesting a resistant reading of Chaucer's reaction to orthodox theology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: South Atlantic Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 61, 4 (Fall 1996): 1-21. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

94. Record Number: 1387
Author(s): Gwara, Scott.
Contributor(s):
Title : Drypoint Glossing in a Tenth-Century Manuscript of Aldhelm's Prose Treatise on Virginity [description and an edition of the new Old English glosses found in BL MS Royal 5 E. xi].
Source: Traditio , 51., ( 1996):  Pages 99 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1996.

95. Record Number: 1169
Author(s): Tasioulas, J.A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Mother's Lament: "Wulf and Eadwacer" Reconsidered [suggests that the poem concerns a mother mourning the fate of her illegitimate infant, left to die in the woods].
Source: Medium Aevum , 65., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1996.

96. Record Number: 992
Author(s): Menzer, Melinda J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Aglaecwif ("Beowulf" 1259A): Implications for "-Wif" Compounds, Grendel's Mother, and Other "Aglaecan"
Source: English Language Notes , 34., 1 (Sept. 1996):  Pages 1 - 6.
Year of Publication: 1996.

97. Record Number: 1091
Author(s): Rigg, A. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Latin Poem on St. Hilda and Whitby Abbey
Source: Journal of Medieval Latin , 6., ( 1996):  Pages 12 - 43.
Year of Publication: 1996.

98. Record Number: 455
Author(s): van Dijk, Willibrord- Christian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Une Traduction Française du XVeSiècle de la Vie de Sainte Claire de Thomas de Celano
Source: Laurentianum , 36., 40180 ( 1995):  Pages 3 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1995.

99. Record Number: 767
Author(s): Seror, Simon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Noms des femmes juives en Angleterre au Moyen Age [list of 115 Jewish women's names, including variant forms, etymologies, and notes].
Source: Revue des Études juives , 154., 40241 (juillet-décembre 1995):  Pages 295 - 325.
Year of Publication: 1995.

100. Record Number: 851
Author(s): Loyn, Henry.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dorothy Whitelock (1901-1982) [biographical sketch of the Anglo-Saxonist].
Source: Medieval Scholarship: Biographical Studies on the Formation of a Discipline. Volume 1: History.   Edited by Helen Damico and Joseph B. Zavadil .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Revue des Études juives , 154., 40241 (juillet-décembre 1995):  Pages 289 - 300.
Year of Publication: 1995.

101. Record Number: 1125
Author(s): Henderson, J. Frank.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminizing the Rule of Benedict in Medieval England [study of five Middle English translations and one Latin version, examining changes from masculine language as well as feminization of such aspects of monastic life as clothing and the practice of charity]
Source: Magistra , 1., 1 (Summer 1995):  Pages 9 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1995.

102. Record Number: 1546
Author(s): Dimitrova, Margaret.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mary of Egypt in Medieval Slavic Literacy [comparisons among five Old Church Slavonic versions of the Life of St. Mary of Egypt].
Source: Byzantinoslavica , 56., 3 ( 1995):  Pages 617 - 624.
Year of Publication: 1995.

103. Record Number: 1708
Author(s): Richards, Earl Jeffrey.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Search of a Feminist Patrology : Christine de Pizan and "Les Glorieux Dotteurs"
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Byzantinoslavica , 56., 3 ( 1995):  Pages 281 - 295. First published in Mystics Quarterly 21, 1 (March 1995): 3-17.
Year of Publication: 1995.

104. Record Number: 590
Author(s): Weston, L. M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Medicine, Women's Magic: The Old English Metrical Childbirth Charms
Source: Modern Philology (Full Text via JSTOR) 92, 3 (February 1995): 279-293. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

105. Record Number: 8475
Author(s): de Courcelles, Dominique.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le Dialogue de Catherine de Sienne ou l'accès du sujet intelligent créé à la perfection ultime du langage Thomiste au langage de l'âme
Source: Archives d'histoire doctrinale et littéraire du Moyen Age , 62., ( 1995):  Pages 71 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1995.

106. Record Number: 2524
Author(s): Tarnowski, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jehan et Blonde and the Exemplary Hero [argues that Jehan is represented as a hero, not only because of his feat of arms, but because of his skill with words as evidenced by his victory in a series of "gabs" or riddles with his rival in love, the Count of Gloucester].
Source: Comparative Literature Studies , 32., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 262 - 279.
Year of Publication: 1995.

107. Record Number: 485
Author(s): Smol, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Female Critic and the Mother Tongue: Elizabeth Elstob's Anglo-Saxonism [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 134].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

108. Record Number: 1160
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cult of the Mother of God "Osenóvifsa" (She Who Overshadows)
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 46 Full article later published as "The Cult of the Mother of God "Osianovitsa" (She Who Overshadows)." Probleme der Kunst (Sofia, Bulgaria) Issue dedicated to Professor Dr. E. Bakalova (1998):25-30.
Year of Publication: 1995.

109. Record Number: 499
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Extended Polysemy of Old English "earg" [having the sense of unmanliness or unnatural behavior; Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 415.]
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

110. Record Number: 368
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesca da Rimini and Dante's Women Readers
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):  Pages 71 - 83.
Year of Publication: 1995.

111. Record Number: 1116
Author(s): Richards, Earl Jeffrey.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Search of a Feminist Patrology: Christine de Pizan and "les glorieux dotteurs" of the Church
Source:   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont Mystics Quarterly , 21., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 3 - 17. Later published in Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan. Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont. Paradigme, 1995. Pages 281-295
Year of Publication: 1995.

112. Record Number: 2807
Author(s): Bounfour, Abdellah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexe, parole et culpabilité dans le récit coranique de l'origine
Source: Studia Islamica , 81., (juin 1995):  Pages 43 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1995.

113. Record Number: 638
Author(s): Byrne, Francis John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Derdu: The Feminine of "Mocu" [meaning "a woman belonging to the people or tribe of"].
Source: Éigse: A Journal of Irish Studies , 28., ( 1995):  Pages 42 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1995.

114. Record Number: 1493
Author(s): Padel, O.J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Notes on the New Edition of the Middle Cornish "Charter Endorsement" [a review of the Middle Cornish Charter Endorsement. The Making of a Marriage in Medieval Cornwall. Middle Cornish Text with Introduction, Translation, Commentary, and Glossary Critically Edited by Lauren Toorians. Institut für Sprachwissenschaft der Universität Innsbruck, 1991; Padel suggests a number of corrections and alternative readings for the Cornish text].
Source: Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies , 30., (Winter 1995):  Pages 123 - 127.
Year of Publication: 1995.

115. Record Number: 6622
Author(s): Sagnella, Mary Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : Carnal Metaphors and Mystical Discourse in Angela da Foligno's "Liber" [The author argues that Angela's self-hate and mortification of her body awakened her senses and led her to mystical union with Christ's body].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 79 - 90. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

116. Record Number: 140
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Language and the Body in Thomas of Cantimpré's Life of Lutgard of Aywières
Source: Cistercian Studies Quarterly , 30., 4 ( 1995):  Pages 339 - 347.
Year of Publication: 1995.

117. Record Number: 677
Author(s): Laing, Margaret and Angus McIntosh
Contributor(s):
Title : The Language of "Ancrene Riwle," the Katherine Group Texts and "The Wohunge of Ure Lauerd" in BL Cotton Titus D XVIII [detailed analysis of language overlays including a North West Midland element and a North Midland element].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 235 - 263.
Year of Publication: 1995.

118. Record Number: 3514
Author(s): Gill, Katherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Production of Religious Literature in the Vernacular, 1300-1500
Source: Creative Women in Medieval and Early Modern Italy: A Religious and Artistic Renaissance.   Edited by E. Ann Matter and John Coakley .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994. Studies in Spirituality , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 64 - 104.
Year of Publication: 1994.

119. Record Number: 1383
Author(s): Rusche, Philip G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dry-Point Glosses to Aldhelm's "De laudibus virginitatis" in Beinecke 401 [includes an edition of the Old English glosses].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 23., ( 1994):  Pages 195 - 213.
Year of Publication: 1994.

120. Record Number: 4333
Author(s): Copeland, Rita.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Women Can't Read: Medieval Hermeneutics, Statutory Law, and the Lollard Heresy Trials
Source: Representing Women: Law, Literature, and Feminism.   Edited by Susan Sage Heinzelman and Zipporah Batshaw Wiseman .   Duke University Press, 1994. Anglo-Saxon England , 23., ( 1994):  Pages 253 - 286.
Year of Publication: 1994.

121. Record Number: 6335
Author(s): Wis, Marjatta.
Contributor(s):
Title : mîn her, mîn vrou gegenüber "monsieur, madame": Zur Verwendung des französischen Titels im Mittelhochdeutschen
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 95., ( 1994):  Pages 147 - 166.
Year of Publication: 1994.

122. Record Number: 639
Author(s): Ní Dhonnchadha, Máirín.
Contributor(s):
Title : Caillech and Other Terms for Veiled Women in Medieval Irish Texts [meanings discussed are: wife, nun, penitent spouse, witch, and housekeeper].
Source: Éigse: A Journal of Irish Studies , 28., ( 1994):  Pages 71 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1994.

123. Record Number: 3409
Author(s): de Looze, Laurence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex, Lies, and Fabliaux: Gender, Scribal Practice, and Old/New Philology in "Du Chevalier qui Fist les cons parler"
Source: Romanic Review , 85., 4 (November 1994):  Pages 495 - 516.
Year of Publication: 1994.

124. Record Number: 4402
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Diminished by Kindness: Frederick Klaeber's Rewriting of Wealhtheow [The author argues that Klaeber was so influenced by his nineteenth century background (in which women were only mothers and had no power) that he mistranslated words to avoid Wealhtheow's power and political maneuvering].
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 93., 2 (April 1994):  Pages 183 - 203.
Year of Publication: 1994.

125. Record Number: 1640
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Writing as Mirror in the Work of Marguerite Porete
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 20., 3 (September 1994):  Pages 105 - 112.
Year of Publication: 1994.

126. Record Number: 4207
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Lexical Inequities in Marriage: Old English "Wif," "Wer," and "Husbonda" [The author argues that the replacement of "Wer" by "Husbonda" reflected the increased status and powers of the husband over his wife].
Source: Studia Neophilologica , 66., ( 1994):  Pages 3 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1994.

127. Record Number: 1951
Author(s): Shaw, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anglo-Saxon Attitudes of the "Ingenious and Learned Mrs. Elstob"
Source: Papers from the VII International Conference of the Spanish Society for Medieval English Language & Literature. .  1994. Studia Neophilologica , 66., ( 1994):  Pages 327 - 349.
Year of Publication: 1994.

128. Record Number: 1774
Author(s): Taylor, Paul Beekman.
Contributor(s):
Title : Roland's Aude : Retrieving the Treasure in Name [origins and meaning of the name Aude].
Source: Romance Quarterly , 41., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 195 - 203.
Year of Publication: 1994.

129. Record Number: 5511
Author(s): McGinn, Bernard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: Meister Eckhart and the Beguines in the Context of Vernacular Theology
Source: Meister Eckhart and the Beguine Mystics: Hadewijch of Brabant, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Marguerite Porete.   Edited by Bernard McGinn .   Continuum, 1994. Romance Quarterly , 41., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1994.

130. Record Number: 1436
Author(s): Finnegan, Robert Emmett.
Contributor(s):
Title : She Should Have Said No to Walter: Griselda's Promise in "The Clerk's Tale" [emphasis on Griselda's moral responsibility with an analyis of the terms "assenten" and "consenten" and "tempten," "assaien," and "assaillen"].
Source: English Studies , 75., 4 (July 1994):  Pages 303 - 321.
Year of Publication: 1994.

131. Record Number: 2278
Author(s): Girsch, Elizabeth Stevens.
Contributor(s):
Title : Metaphorical Usage, Sexual Exploitation, and Divergence in the Old English Terminology for Male and Female Slaves [differences in female and male usage with an emphasis for females on sexual availability and, in metaphorical cases in religious writings, on humility and passivity].
Source: The Work of Work: Servitude, Slavery, and Labor in Medieval England.   Edited by Allen J. Frantzen and Douglas Moffat .   Cruithne Press, 1994. English Studies , 75., 4 (July 1994):  Pages 30 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1994.

132. Record Number: 1381
Author(s): Hough, Carole A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Early Kentish "Divorce Laws": A Reconsideration of Aethelberht, Chs. 79 and 80 [argues that the text traditionally taken as evidence of divorce is in fact about a widow who either remains celibate, keeping her inheritance and children, or remarries and loses her inheritance and, possibly, her children as well].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 23., ( 1994):  Pages 19 - 34.
Year of Publication: 1994.

133. Record Number: 3561
Author(s): Lees, Clare A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men and "Beowulf" [The author argues that the masculinity in "Beowulf" is not as transparent as earlier critics have thought; the poem is both appreciative and critical of the patriarchal warriors].
Source: Medieval Masculinities: Regarding Men in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Clare A. Lees with the assistance of Thelma Fenster and Jo Ann McNamara Medieval Cultures, 7.   University of Minnesota Press, 1994. Anglo-Saxon England , 23., ( 1994):  Pages 129 - 148. Reprinted in The Postmodern "Beowulf": A Critical Casebook. Edited by Eileen A. Joy and Mary K. Ramsey with the assistance of Bruce D. Gilchrist. West Virginia University Press, 2006. Pages 417-438.
Year of Publication: 1994.

134. Record Number: 1408
Author(s): Taylor, Keith P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beowulf1259a: The Inherent Nobility of Grendel's Mother [meaning of the phrase "ides aglaecwif].
Source: English Language Notes , 31., 3 (March 1994):  Pages 13 - 25.
Year of Publication: 1994.

135. Record Number: 2470
Author(s): Pezzini, Domenico.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Vocabulary of Joy in Julian of Norwich
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 94 - 115.
Year of Publication: 1994.

136. Record Number: 1876
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexual Vocabulary in Medieval Russia
Source: Sexuality and the Body in Russian Culture.   Edited by Jane T. Costlow, Stephanie Sandler, and Judith Vowles .   Stanford University Press, 1993. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 95., ( 1994):  Pages 41 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1993.

137. Record Number: 8731
Author(s): Rispler-Chaim, Vardit.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nushuz Between Medieval and Contemporary Islamic Law: The Human Rights Aspect [The author examines the legal implications, medieval and modern, of "nushuz", which can refer either to the rebellion of a woman against her husband, or to a husband’s cruel treatment of his wife. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Arabica , 39., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 315 - 327.
Year of Publication: 1992.

138. Record Number: 10242
Author(s): Mahoney, Dhira B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe’s Tears and the Power Over Language [Margery’s tears play a significant role in her attempt to define herself and her role in society. She communicates her unique status to others through her tears. Weeping marks her as a woman who is both of the world while remaining apart from it, and she demonstrates her power outside of language by means of her tears and prayers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 95., ( 1994):  Pages 37 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1992.

139. Record Number: 10373
Author(s): Margolis, Nadia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Elegant Closures: The Use of the Diminutive in Christine de Pizan and Jean de Meun [Christine wasn’t overcome by any anxiety of influence in regard to her poetic predecessor Jean de Meun; instead, she was independent in her use of rhetoric. Her use of diminutives, in particular, is a powerful tool for expressing her feminist concerns. While male authors tend to use the diminutive form of words in order to condescend, Christine uses these word forms in more subtle and varied ways. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Arabica , 39., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 111 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1992.

140. Record Number: 10376
Author(s): Curnow, Maureen Cheney.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Pioche d’Inquisition: Legal-Judicial Content and Style in Christine de Pizan’s "Livre de la Cite des Dames" [During her early years as a writer, Christine had extensive experience with royal law courts and legal proceedings both in her own life and in connection with her father and her husband. Christine’s knowledge and application of legal terminology and style in her work reflects the close connection between law and rhetoric in medieval education. Drawing upon her own education, Christine uses legal vocabulary in her poetry as part of a larger argument in favor of female participation in the law. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Arabica , 39., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 157 - 172.
Year of Publication: 1992.

141. Record Number: 10383
Author(s): Kennedy, Angus J.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Selective Bibliography of Christine de Pizan Scholarship, circa 1980-1987 [Includes five categories: previous bibliographies; manuscripts; editions, translations, and anthologies; critical studies; and language and language-related studies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Arabica , 39., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 285 - 298.
Year of Publication: 1992.

142. Record Number: 10799
Author(s): Holten, Kathryn I.
Contributor(s):
Title : Metamorphosis and Language in the Lay of "Bisclavret" [The author shows that Marie uses the image of the domesticated werewolf to both awaken and soothe cultural anxieties regarding feudalism (a system which relies upon language codes to function). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In Quest of Marie de France: A Twelfth-Century Poet.   Edited by Chantal A. Marechal .   Edwin Mellen Press, 1992. Arabica , 39., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 193 - 211.
Year of Publication: 1992.

143. Record Number: 8725
Author(s): Beckwith, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Problems of Authority in Late Medieval English Mysticism: Language, Agency, and Authority in the "Book of Margery Kempe" [Considering Margery Kempe's "Book" in terms of mystical discourse, vernacularity, and late medieval English religious writings, the author examines the conditions of medieval subjectivity, particularly that of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 4., 1 (Spring 1992):  Pages 171 - 199.
Year of Publication: 1992.

144. Record Number: 8318
Author(s): Coleman, Julie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexual Euphemism in Old English
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 93., ( 1992):  Pages 93 - 98.
Year of Publication: 1992.

145. Record Number: 10271
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Style and meaning in Judith [The author discusses the literary style, with an emphasis on techniques like repetition, and the use of "heroic" language, in the Old English poem, "Judith." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Notes and Queries , 1 (March 1992):  Pages 16 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1992.

146. Record Number: 7420
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Issue of Feminine Monstrosity: A Reevaluation of Grendel's Mother [The author argues that labeling Grendel's mother "monstrous" is a relatively recent trend, originating not in the text itself (which calls her a "lady" and a "warrior"), but in translations and literary critical treatments of the text. The author argues that Grendel's mother was considered terrible because she violated gender norms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Comitatus , 23., ( 1992):  Pages 1 - 16.
Year of Publication: 1992.

147. Record Number: 10274
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Instantaneous Harvest and the Harley Lyric "Mayden Moder Milde" [The author demonstrates that the anonymous Middle English lyric, "Mayden Moder Milde" may refer to the legendary miraculous harvest provided by the Blessed Virgin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1992):  Pages 150 - 152.
Year of Publication: 1992.

148. Record Number: 10529
Author(s): Regnier-Bohler, Danielle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Literary and Mystical Voices [The relationship between women and language in medieval texts is complicated and contradictory. Some writers ascribe great agency and power to women’s use of language, while others seek to silence female voices. Mythical figures like Philomena, Echo, and Griselda are pervasive figures of silent women, and actual medieval women do not necessarily speak in their own voices (they are mediated by male writers). In addition, women’s use of language is often deemed evil, unreliable, or obscene. Literary voices like the poet Christine de Pizan and female mystics like Margery Kempe express themselves in new styles that are at once powerful and complex. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1992):  Pages 427 - 482.
Year of Publication: 1992.

149. Record Number: 9456
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Latin Vocabulary of Illicit Sex in English Ecclesiastical Court Records [The author conducts a survey of the terminology that courts used to refer to various types of sexual behavior, particularly adultery, fornication, and prostitution. The language is far from straightforward, as different terms could be used for the same behaviors, depending on the individual case. Moreover, it is often unclear what behaviors are being described. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval Latin , 2., ( 1992):  Pages 1 - 17.
Year of Publication: 1992.

150. Record Number: 10276
Author(s): Dane, Joseph A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mulier Est Hominis Confusio: Note On Chaucer's "Nun's Priest's Tale" [The author argues that Chaucer may intentionally pun on the word "confusio" from the proverb "mulier est hominis confusio." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1992):  Pages 276 - 278.
Year of Publication: 1992.

151. Record Number: 10245
Author(s): Lawton, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Voice, Authority, and Blasphemy in "The Book of Margery Kempe" [The author examines the importance of blasphemy in the production of literary texts in fifteenth-century England; during this time, vernacular writing was sometimes associated with heresy. While some readers fear Kempe expresses unorthodox religious ideas, the author notes that Kempe espouses orthodox views. Kempe also demonstrates a knowledge of Latin texts even though she claims to be illiterate. Ultimately, Kempe’s unique voice as a woman is preserved through the text even if her speech is mediated by a long line of male scribes and editors. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1992):  Pages 93 - 115.
Year of Publication: 1992.

152. Record Number: 11218
Author(s): Carlson, Paula J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lady Meed and God’s Meed: The Grammar of 'Piers Plowman' B 3 and C 4 [In revising his poem, William Langland expands a passage (in what is known as the B-text) into a longer passage (in what is known as the C-text) that describes the debate between Conscience and Lady Meed. Much of modern readers’ confusion about the meaning of the C-text passage lies in the misleading punctuation in W. W. Skeat’s printed edition of the poem. The editor’s punctuation choices obscure the sustained grammatical metaphor Langland uses in the revised C-text. In this new passage, the relationship between nouns and adjectives are meant to describe (by way of analogy) the relationship between God and humanity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 46., ( 1991):  Pages 291 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1991.

153. Record Number: 11820
Author(s): Pulsiano, Phillip and Kirsten Wolf
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Hwelp" in "Wulf and Eadwacer" [The symbolic meaning of the "hwelp" (whelp, young dog or wolf) in is much debated in this Old English poem. Some critics interpret the "hwelp" as representing a child who is born as a result of an illicit love affair, but the authors argue that many references to wolves in Old Norse literature and law suggest that the "hwelp" in this poem is the child of an outlaw father. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Language Notes , 28., 3 (March 1991):  Pages 1 - 9.
Year of Publication: 1991.

154. Record Number: 11068
Author(s): Nichols, Stephen G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France’s Commonplaces [In her lais, Marie espouses the low culture of oral tradition and Breton folk tales over the literate Latin tradition, which was held in high esteem. The poetic technique of her lais combines classical rhetoric and popular narrative elements (like the use of vernacular and common proverbs). Her innovative use of commonplaces departs from Classical traditions and reforms the attitudes toward women and sexuality expressed in canonical Latin poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 134-148. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

155. Record Number: 13346
Author(s): Lhoest, Benoît
Contributor(s):
Title : Les dénominations de la femme en Moyen Français: approche lexicale et anthropologique [The author has built a corpus of 74 words referring to women in the late Middle Ages and Early Modern era. In analyzing the results, Lhoest finds that many of the terms refer to negative qualities characterizing women as ugly, stupid, weak, drunk, and wanton. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Zeitschrift für Romanische Philologie , 107., 3/4 ( 1991):  Pages 343 - 362.
Year of Publication: 1991.

156. Record Number: 12687
Author(s): Ireland, Colin A.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Coverchief or a Calle: The Ultimate End of the Wife of Bath's Search for Sovereignty [The author suggests that the Wife of Bath and her tale may be influenced by Irish stories both in the figure of the Loathly Lady who awards sovereignty over the kingdom and in the meaning of the word "calle" (Middle English: hair net, headdress) (Modern English "caul"). The author argues that Chaucer may be drawing on the Irish words "caille" (veil) and "caillech" (veiled one) to give a metaphorical meaning to "calle" as a marker of a woman's station in life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neophilologus , 75., ( 1991):  Pages 150 - 159.
Year of Publication: 1991.

157. Record Number: 10682
Author(s): Ross, Ellen M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Experience and Women's Autobiography: The Rhetoric of Selfhood in "The Book of Margery Kempe" [Kempe uses domestic and familial language as the dominant metaphors for describing her relationship with the divine and her mode of understanding, experiencing, and expressing the self. Not only does she use relational terms like "daughter," "mother," and "sister" to describe her connections to Christ and the Virgin Mary, but she also identifies herself with a tradition of holy women and, at other times, as a prophet. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 59., 3 (Fall 1991):  Pages 527 - 546.
Year of Publication: 1991.

158. Record Number: 11819
Author(s): Cestaro, Gary P.
Contributor(s):
Title : ...quanquam Sarnum biberimus ante dentes...: The Primal Scene of Suckling in Dante's De vulgari eloquentia [In his treatise on language, Dante foregrounds suckling imagery and the importance of the maternal body. This maternal imagery stems from a long tradition of representing the allegorical figure of Grammatica (grammar) as a nurse. According to psychoanalytic theory, the assumed natural primacy of the vernacular as a mother tongue (a native language acquired before Latin) evokes a primal scene of union with the mother (a state that precedes linguistic communication in human development). Nonetheless, the rationalistic male grammarian perpetually struggles to obscure the feminine origins of speech in order to maintain strict gender boundaries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 119 - 147.
Year of Publication: 1991.

159. Record Number: 11804
Author(s): Classen, Albrecht.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Implications of Feminist Theory on the Study of Medieval German Literature. Also an Introduction [The author discusses the broad implications of approaching medieval German literature from a feminist theoretical perspective. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women as Protagonists and Poets in the German Middle Ages: An Anthology of Feminist Approaches to Middle High German Literature.   Edited by Albrecht Classen .   Kümmerle Verlag, 1991. Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):
Year of Publication: 1991.

160. Record Number: 11048
Author(s): Durling, Nancy Vine.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Mieux vaut jamais que tard”: Romance, Philology, and Old French Letters [The author discusses the shift in Old French philological studies away from the pleasure associated with romanticism and the feminine towards a rigid, exclusive privileging of “masculine,” scientific mastery. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Representations (Full Text via JSTOR) 36 (Autumn 1991): 64-86. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

161. Record Number: 12282
Author(s): Goez, Werner.
Contributor(s):
Title : Matilda Dei gratia si quid est. Die Urkunden-Unterfertigung der Burgherrin von Canossa [Author discusses the use of the formula "Dei gratia si quid est" in Countess Mathilda of Tuscany's signature on documents. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Deutsches Archiv für Erforschung des Mittelalters , 47., ( 1991):  Pages 378 - 394.
Year of Publication: 1991.

162. Record Number: 6508
Author(s): Robertini, Luca.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'Uso del diminutivo in Rosvita [the diminutive has an informal, oral ring in Hrotsvitha's Latin; she used it frequently in her early works but less thereafter; many of Hrotsvitha's diminutives seem to have been derived from the Latin classics via the grammarians].
Source: Medioevo e Rinascimento , ( 1990):  Pages 123 - 142.
Year of Publication: 1990.

163. Record Number: 12694
Author(s): O'Connor, Eugene M.
Contributor(s):
Title : More on the "Priapeum" of Jacobus Cremonensis [This fifteenth century Latin poem describes an erotic encounter between the Classical fertility god Priapus and the nymph Dione. The author corrects and expands the commentary written on the poem by a previous editor, Ian Thompson. In his commentary, Thompson failed to recognize that many of the Latin terms in the poem are not euphemisms but sexually explicit terms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 389 - 391.
Year of Publication: 1990.

164. Record Number: 12736
Author(s): Takacs, Sarolta A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Manuel Philes’ Meditation on an Icon of the Virgin Mary [This devotional poem by the fourteenth century Greek poet represents a progression from a meditation of a concrete object (an icon of the Virgin Mary) to a mystical or metaphysical plane of understanding. The author gives a line by line analysis of the language of the poem, which employs numerous rhetorical devices to connect allusions to the burning bush (which typographically prefigures the Virgin Mary) to imagery of divine fire. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 15., ( 1990):  Pages 277 - 288.
Year of Publication: 1990.

165. Record Number: 12737
Author(s): Saradi-Mendelovici, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Contribution to the Study of the Byzantine Notarial Formulas: The "infirmitas sexus" of Women and the "senatusconsultum Velleianum" [The author traces two notarial formulae that were commonly used in legal documents under Roman and Byzantine law: the “infirmitas sexus” (the legal designation of the inferiority of women as a natural characteristic) and the “senatusconsultum Velleianum” (a set of imperial provisions and restrictions imposed upon women). Both of these formulae appear in the middle to late Byzantine periods, where the Byzantine legislation perpetuates ancient restrictions on women’s legal capacities. The natural inferiority of women was often cited as the reason for why imperial legislation must protect and limit their actions. Appendix includes a list of relevant notarial documents in chronological order, including the parties involved , the notary who drew up the document, the location, and the legal formulation used. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantinische Zeitschrift , 83., ( 1990):  Pages 72 - 90.
Year of Publication: 1990.

166. Record Number: 12743
Author(s): Keefer, Sarah Larratt.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Monastic Echo in an Old English Charm [The Old English metrical poem most commonly known as “Charm for Delayed Birth” is often interpreted as a magical incantation intended to protect a woman from a spontaneous miscarriage or stillbirth. Although the poem may have origins in pagan practices, the poem’s references to Bethlehem and the Nativity give it Christian relevance. Moreover, the poem repeatedly echoes monastic references to scripture and liturgy, giving the poem an oral quality that could serve a prayerful or devotional purpose instead of just being a pagan incantation with Christian terminology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 71 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1990.

167. Record Number: 12754
Author(s): Lewis, Suzanne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Apocalypse of Isabella of France: Paris, Bibl. Nat. MS Fr. 13096. The Appendix outlines the picture cycle and text of the manuscript, listing the text (by chapter and verse number) and subject matter of images on each folio [Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 2 (June 1990):  Pages 224 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1990.

168. Record Number: 12799
Author(s): Meyer, Marc A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Early Anglo-Saxon Penitentials and the Position of Women [The author argues that, although women in Anglo-Saxon culture were subjugated to men, examining penitential books from the period reveals an elevation in the position and status of women in the family. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Haskins Society Journal , 2., ( 1990):  Pages 47 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1990.

169. Record Number: 12780
Author(s): Hill, Thomas D.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Wealhtheow” as a Foreign Slave: Some Continental Analogues [The author discusses the possible meaning of Wealhtheow’s name (“foreign slave”) in relation to relevant parallels in patterns of medieval royal marriage, particularly in northern Continental kingdoms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 69., ( 1990):  Pages 107 - 112.
Year of Publication: 1990.

170. Record Number: 11195
Author(s): de Looze, Laurence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France et la Textualisation: Arbre, Enfant, Oeuvre dans le Lai de "Fresne" [Throughout the poem, Marie de France exploits metaphorical language that connects the process of procreation (the birth of a child through sexual reproduction) and the generation of a text by a writer. The metaphorical correspondence between the labor or “work” of writing and the labor of childbirth informs the language of many French texts written during this time. The anxieties expressed by modern scholars who attempt to use manuscripts to reconstruct a pure and authorial edition of a text thus reflect medieval writers’ own anxieties about the legitimacy of sexual and textual reproduction. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 4 ( 1990):  Pages 396 - 408.
Year of Publication: 1990.

171. Record Number: 12804
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Terms of Kindred, or Kindred on Good and Bad Terms: Parzival's Vulgar Slaying of His Father's "Neve" Ither [The author interrogates the meaning of the polysemous term “neve” (which can mean grandson, nephew, or cousin) as it relates to kinship ties in Parzival. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 26., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 160 - 184.
Year of Publication: 1990.

172. Record Number: 12742
Author(s): Beattie, D. R. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Yemenite Tradition of Targum Ruth [The author examines the language in eleven Yemenite manuscripts containing Aramaic translations of the Book of Ruth from the Hebrew Bible. Although the modifications and variants in the manuscripts that have been introduced in the text resemble developments that occurred in Western medieval manuscripts and Yemenite manuscripts of the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries, the author establishes that these eleven manuscripts are much more recent productions based upon European printed texts. Nonetheless, these more recent manuscripts do contain improvements upon the text of the Targum Ruth, including the correct use of an idiomatic form of the Aramaic verb “to marry” in place of a literal translation of the Hebrew verb “to take” (introduced in the twelfth or thirteenth century). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Jewish Studies , 41., 2 (Autumn 1990):  Pages 49 - 56.
Year of Publication: 1990.

173. Record Number: 12731
Author(s): Giladi, Avner.
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Observations on Infanticide in Medieval Muslim Society [Infanticide was a recognized practice in Arabia before the emergence of Islam, and although Muhammed denounced the practice in the Qu'ran, evidence from Qu'anic commentaries and hadith literature indicate that it persisted (even in post-Islamic Arabia) as a family planning strategy. For instance, a family under extreme economic pressure might allow an infant (especially a girl) to die soon after birth. Although Arab polytheists may have willingly sacrificed children (especially males, who were deemed most precious), Muslims viewed boys and girls as equals and on the whole rejected infanticide. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: International Journal of Middle East Studies , 22., 2 (May 1990):  Pages 185 - 200.
Year of Publication: 1990.

174. Record Number: 12768
Author(s): Treharne, Elaine M.
Contributor(s):
Title : They should not worship devils ... which neither can see, nor hear, nor walk: The Sensibility of the Virtuous and "The Life of St. Margaret" [The author argues that the hagiographer who wrote the Life of St. Margaret used simple, direct language, sensational detail, repeated themes, and constant appeals to the audience’s imagination in order to ensure that medieval listeners would both be entertained and instructed by the tale. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Proceedings of the Patristic, Mediaeval, and Renaissance Conference , 15., ( 1990):  Pages 221 - 236.
Year of Publication: 1990.

175. Record Number: 12730
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Blessed Virgin's Joys and Sorrows [Based upon a comparison with analogous material in English, Latin, and Anglo-Norman texts, the author establishes the dating and attribution of three religious poems (two in Welsh and one in Irish) that concern the Virgin's joys and sorrows. Although the manuscripts attribute the three poems to three thirteenth century poets, the textual evidence indicates that they were actually written by three entirely different poets in the fourteenth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 19., (Summer 1990):  Pages 41 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1990.

176. Record Number: 11196
Author(s): Ahern, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nudi Grammantes: The Grammar and Rhetoric of Deviation in Inferno XV [Male genitalia have a complex range of metaphorical meanings. Certain writers in the medieval rhetorical tradition align sexuality and rhetoric, comparing forms unorthodox sexuality (like sodomy) with perversions of language. Most notably, Brunetto Latini, a grammarian and sodomite who appears in the Inferno, uses a series of puns involving the word “fico” (fig or tree), confusing the word’s natural (biological) and grammatical gender. In Latin and Italian, this word (meaning both tree and fruit) could metaphorically stand for either the male or the female sexual organs. Brunetto’s learned yet ambiguous use of language thus suggests his own sexual deviancy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 4 ( 1990):  Pages 466 - 486.
Year of Publication: 1990.