Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


66 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 32554
Author(s): McCall, Timothy,
Contributor(s):
Title : Brilliant Bodies: Material Culture and the Adornment of Men in North Italy’s Quattrocento Courts
Source: I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 445 - 490.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 38478
Author(s): [no author]
Contributor(s):
Title : La Prammatica sulle vesti delle donne fiorentine (Firenze 1343-1345)
Source: Draghi rossi e querce azzurre: elenchi descrittivi di abiti di lusso (Firenze 1343-1345).   Edited by Laurence Gérard-Marchant .   SISMEL, 2013. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 1 - 516.
Year of Publication: 2013.

3. Record Number: 35524
Author(s): Datini, Margherita,
Contributor(s): Pagliaro, Antonio, trans. and James, Carolyn, trans.
Title : Letters to Francesco Datini
Source: Letters to Francesco Datini. Margherita Datini   Edited by Carolyn James and Antonio Pagliaro. The Other Voice in Early Modern Europe: The Toronto Series .   Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2012. I Tatti Studies in the Italian Renaissance , 16., 1- 2 ( 2013):  Pages 1 - 431.
Year of Publication: 2012.

4. Record Number: 27566
Author(s): Higley, Sarah
Contributor(s):
Title : Dressing up the Nuns: The “Lingua ignota” and Hildegard of Bingen’s Clothing [The author analyzes the words that Hildegard invented for women’s clothing in the “Lingua ignota.” The abbess placed an emphasis on hierarchy and order, marking the special status of virgins. Higley connects this to the crowns and floor-length veils worn by Hildegard’s nuns on feast days. The canoness Tenxwind wrote Hildegard complaining about this practice as immodest. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 93 - 109.
Year of Publication: 2010.

5. Record Number: 27568
Author(s): Stanford, Charlotte A. ,
Contributor(s):
Title : Donations from the Body for the Soul: Apparel, Devotion, and Status in Late Medieval Strasbourg [The author analyzes evidence of lay people’s contributions to the building and services of Strasbourg’s cathedral as recorded in the “Book of Donors” from the early fourteenth century to 1521. Many people contributed clothing and related items, both for resale and for use in liturgical services. Stanford notes women’s participation as donors and the varieties of women’s clothing and ornaments given as gifts. She underlines the personal nature of many women’s gifts including elaborate linens decorated with gold and silk destined for the Virgin’s chapel. The appendices include a glossary of apparel-related terms in the “Book of Donors” both in Latin and in German (pages 199-205). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 173 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2010.

6. Record Number: 30087
Author(s): Schlotheuber, Eva
Contributor(s):
Title : Best Clothes and Everyday Attire of Late Medieval Nuns
Source: Fashion and Clothing in Late Medieval Europe/ Mode und Kleidung im Europa des späten Mittelalters.   Edited by Regula Schorta and Rainer C. Schwinges .   Abegg-Stiftung/Schwabe Verlag, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 139 - 154.
Year of Publication: 2010.

7. Record Number: 22417
Author(s): Izbicki, Thomas M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Failed Censures: Ecclesiastical Regulation of Women’s Clothing in Late Medieval Italy [Ecclesiastical efforts to regulate vanity of dress were few in late medieval Italy. Most significant was a constitution written by Cardinal Latino Malabranca intended to limit display of flesh and waste of cloth. By the fourteenth century compromises were being made in the enforcement of this decree, and new issues involving the wearing of jewelry and other ornaments were being addressed. By the fifteenth century, sumptuary legislation was largely left to the Italian communes, although some of the clergy still advocated strict measures against vain dress and ornamentation. The appendices include: Appendix 3.1 Cardinal Latino Malabranca's Constitution on Women's dress (1279); Appendix 3.2 Cardinal Bertrand du Poujet's Modification of Cardinal Latino's Constitution (ca. 1327) ; Appendix 3.3 The Constitution of Antonio d'Orso Biliotti, Bishop of Florence (ca. 1310). Title note submitted by the author.]
Source:   Edited by Robin Netherton; Gale R. Owen-Crocker Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 5., ( 2009):  Pages 37 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2009.

8. Record Number: 18397
Author(s): Twomey, Lesley K
Contributor(s):
Title : Poverty and Richly Decorated Garments: A Re-Evaluation of Their Significance in the "Vita Christi" of Isabel de Villena
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 3., ( 2007):  Pages 119 - 134.
Year of Publication: 2007.

9. Record Number: 20779
Author(s): Meyer, Mati
Contributor(s):
Title : The Levite's Concubine: Imaging the Marginal Woman in Byzantine Society [Provides comparative discussion of different representations of the rape of the concubine within the corpus of illuminated Byzantine manuscripts; extrapolates on what these different representations -particularly of clothing--reveal about contemporary clergy's attitudes towards the concepts of women, sexuality, and the function of marriage. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 27., ( 2006):  Pages 45 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2006.

10. Record Number: 16280
Author(s): Burns, E. Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saracen Silk and the Virgin's "Chemise": Cultural Crossings in Cloth [The article explores the meanings attached to a relic at Chartres, an undergartment belonging to the Virgin. Burns traces connections from the imagined Western linen "chemise" to Islamic silks and Byzantine cuts of clothing. She concludes by arguing that in this way Chartres became more "Saracen." Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 365 - 397.
Year of Publication: 2006.

11. Record Number: 11454
Author(s): Carroll-Clark, Susan M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bad Habits: Clothing and Textile References in the Register of Eudes Rigaud, Archbishop of Rouen [Eudes Rigaud paid inspection visits to all the religious groups in his archbishopric including women's monasteries. In his register nuns were frequently reprimanded for wearing luxury furs, metal belts, and secular clothes. They were also faulted for doing fine needlework as gifts for friends or as items for sale. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 81 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2005.

12. Record Number: 11456
Author(s): Tilghman, Carla.
Contributor(s):
Title : Giovanna Cenami's Veil: A Neglected Detail [The author analyzes the woman's veil in Van Eyck's "Wedding of Arnolfini." Evidence in other artworks suggests that this ruffled veil had its heyday in the mid-to-late fourteenth century. In 1434 Van Eyck may have used the old fashioned veil to signal a ceremonial occasion in which the betrothed young woman by her headress and clothing conveyed dignity and a prosperous social status. Tilghman wove some linen samples to determine the best methods for making ruffled edges. The veil would have had to be a single length without seams approximately six yards long. It would probably have been a specialty item and would have been costly. Tilghman speculates that it might have been a family treasure passed down to Giovanna Cenami. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 155 - 172.
Year of Publication: 2005.

13. Record Number: 11455
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Threads Bared: Dress and Textiles in Late Medieval English Wills [The author analyzes 550 wills from London and Canterbury dating from 1327 to 1487. the majority are from artisans and merchants with 16.5% made by women. Women tended to bequeath more items than men, especially clothing and household textiles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 133 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2005.

14. Record Number: 13760
Author(s): Campbell, Lorne and Yvonne Szafran
Contributor(s):
Title : The Portrait of Isabella of Portugal, Duchess of Burgundy, in the J. Paul Getty Museum [The authors argue that the portrait was based on Rogier van der Weyden's donor portrait of Isabel done for the altarpiece given to the Portugese monastery of Batalha. An assistant painted the panel portrait perhaps around 1450 without the skill or sensitivity of van der Weyden. The painting evidently passed to Isabel's great-granddaughter, Margaret of Austria, where it was given more magnificent clothing and jewels around 1530. An inscription was added perhaps around 1600 identifying the woman as a sibyl. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Burlington Magazine , 146., 1212 (March 2004):  Pages 148 - 157.
Year of Publication: 2004.

15. Record Number: 11751
Author(s): Denny-Brown, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rips and Slits: The Torn Garment and the Medieval Self [A fashion for garments with slits, tears, or perforations originated in the 12th century and flourished after 1340. Some slits were intended to reveal undergarments or flesh, exposing them to the gaze of others. This erotic element inspired sumptuary laws and denunciations. Medieval literature also reveals a close relationship between the terms for these slits and violence, as in dagging and daggers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Clothing Culture, 1350-1650.   Edited by Catherine Richardson .   Ashgate, 2004.  Pages 223 - 237.
Year of Publication: 2004.

16. Record Number: 12610
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Material and Symbolic Gift-Giving: Clothes in English and French Wills [The practice of bequeathing clothing to friends, relatives, and others in one’s will was common in late medieval and Early Modern England and France. Major differences in how clothing is dispensed in the wills arise not when one compares the gender of particular testators but the socioeconomic class of the individual. Among lower class people, items of clothing function as commodities (objects of use or value to be passed along), but for bourgeois and aristocratic people clothing carries both material and symbolic value. In these social classes, giving clothing can signify a sentimental attachment to a person or it can constitute a spiritual act of almsgiving. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 137 - 146.
Year of Publication: 2004.

17. Record Number: 12607
Author(s): Krueger, Roberta L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Uncovering Griselda: Christine de Pizan, “un seule chemise,” and the Clerical Tradition: Boccaccio, Petrarch, Philippe de Mézières and the Ménagier de Paris [Christine’s sparse and forceful retelling of the story of patient Griselda in “La Cité des Dames” corrects the clerical tradition that informed previous versions of the story. While male writers like Petrarch, Boccaccio, and Chaucer frame the Griselda story with interpretive commentary, Christine strips the story of embellishment in order to focus attention on Griselda’s eloquence and her suffering at the will of her cruel husband. Just as Griselda is clothed and unclothed as she shifts in status within the story, so is the Griselda narrative itself rhetorically unclothed as Christine retells it. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Burlington Magazine , 146., 1212 (March 2004):  Pages 71 - 88.
Year of Publication: 2004.

18. Record Number: 11661
Author(s): Izbicki, Thomas M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Origins of the "De ornatu mulierum" of Antoninus of Florence [The author highlights the significance of a legal text on excess in clothing. Franciscan observants had petitioned the pope for an opinion, and he had charged a committe to respond. (Two versions of the report written in Latin are presented as appendices to the article.) The expert committee included Antoninus, archbishop of Florence, and his text, "De ornatu mulierum," Izbicki demonstrates, was originally written to accompany their opinion. In general the committe sought a moderate path and urged respect for individual cities' customs in dress. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: MLN: Modern Language Notes (Full Text via Project Muse) 119, 1 (January 2004): 142-161. Supplement. Studia Humanitatis: Essays in Honor of Salvatore Camporeale. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2004.

19. Record Number: 12609
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Limiting Yardage and Changes of Clothes: Sumptuary Legislation in Thirteenth-Century France, Languedoc, and Italy [In Western Europe, the first laws to control the expenditure and display of dress by laypersons appeared in the thirteenth century. The initial period of regulating activity in Occitania, France, and Italy developed from ecclesiastical laws regulating clerical dress, but the political origins and motivations for the legislation varied by region. Italian and Occitan cities based their legislation upon Roman law, while northern regions of France used customary law; the cities of Montpellier and Siena focused more attention on women’s display than men’s, while most French regions were more interested in keeping a clear correlation between social status and wealth in general. The effects of sumptuary legislation on people in these regions are reflected by numerous sartorial concerns in contemporary vernacular poetry and didactic literatures. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 121 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2004.

20. Record Number: 12605
Author(s): Burns, Jane E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Textiles Make a Difference [Dress, textiles, and cloth production are emerging as important categories of analysis in medieval studies. While investigating textiles and representations thereof (in literary, historical, legal, and religious texts), medievalists cross disciplinary boundaries in order to examine how the personal and cultural realms interact. Social theorists, feminists, and scholars of material culture can all contribute to our understandings of how goods and objects take upon new meanings for men and women in different social contexts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2004.

21. Record Number: 12606
Author(s): Starkey, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Tristan” Slippers: An Image of Adultery or a Symbol of Marriage? [Leather slippers decorated with iconography apparently representing the adulterous courtly couple Tristan and Isolde were popular in the urban centers of the Low Countries, and these shoes were perhaps given as bridal gifts or in betrothal ceremonies. Although the image of an adulterous couple may not seem appropriate for shoes associated with marriage, other iconography on the slippers (such as an orchard, falcon, chessboard, and literary inscriptions) and contemporary Dutch literature about the Tristan story indicate that the urban public was reappropriating elements of courtly culture. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 35 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2004.

22. Record Number: 7835
Author(s): Gilmore, Gloria Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France's "Bisclavret": What the Werewolf Will and Will Not Wear ["This chapter will attempt to unravel that tangled tension in the story of 'Bisclavret,' where there are two opposing functions of clothing: to confine in a social role or identity imposed from without , or to express a self-definition, chosen or generated from within." Page 67.].
Source: Encountering Medieval Textiles and Dress: Objects, Texts, Images.   Edited by Désirée G. Koslin and Janet E. Snyder .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.  Pages 67 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2002.

23. Record Number: 10075
Author(s): Knauer, Elfrieda Regina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Portrait of a Lady? Some Reflections on Images of Prostitutes from the Later Fifteenth Century [The author concentrates on a painting of a woman attributed to Jacometto Veneziano (now in the Philadelphia Museum of Art). She argues that the woman is a prostitute, and that the artist emphasizes her thinning hair, wrinkles, and other defects associated with prostitution. The author suggests that the inscription on the back of the panel should be translated as: "The whore dedicated herself to wantonness, license, lewdness." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 47., ( 2002):  Pages 95 - 117.
Year of Publication: 2002.

24. Record Number: 9336
Author(s): Sterling-Hellenbrand, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Uta and Isolde: Designing a Perfect Woman [The author argues that Gottfried von Strassburg, the creator of Isolde, and the Naumburger Meister who sculpted the statues of Uta and Reglindis not only shared a set of ideals in regard to women but also made their representations of women dynamic and interactive. The description of Isolde's dress does not emphasize color or richness of cloth but instead continuous movement that produces a performance of gender. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 70-89. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

25. Record Number: 8802
Author(s): Sebregondi, Ludovica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clothes and Teenagers: What Young Men Wore in Fifteenth-Century Florence [The author argues that young Florentine men wore distinctive clothing. Tight-fitting and revealing cothing that emphasized the wearer's masculinity were popular. Moralists complained but did not succeed in changing fashions. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002.  Pages 27 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2002.

26. Record Number: 4770
Author(s): Koslin, Desiree.
Contributor(s):
Title : Initiation, Robing, and Veiling of Nuns in the Middle Ages
Source: Robes and Honor: The Medieval World of Investiture.   Edited by Stewart Gordon .   Palgrave, 2001.  Pages 255 - 274.
Year of Publication: 2001.

27. Record Number: 6924
Author(s): Krueger, Roberta L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nouvelles Choses: Social Instability and the Problem of Fashion in the "Livre du Chevalier de la Tour Landry," the "Ménagier de Paris," and Christine de Pizan's "Livre des Trois Vertus" [The author argues that the anti-fashion discourse in the three texts confirms that sumptuary laws and the criticisms of authorities could not control women's desires for new fashions in clothing. In fact in the descriptions and illustrations of fashions
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 47., ( 2002):  Pages 49 - 85.
Year of Publication: 2001.

28. Record Number: 8547
Author(s): Marino, Nancy F.
Contributor(s):
Title : How Portuguese "Damas" Scandalized the Court of Enrique IV of Castile [The young women who accompanied the Portuguese princess Juana to the Castilian court caused a great stir. They dressed provocatively, were sexually aggressive, and sometimes wore men's clothing and carried weapons. Several of them became the mistresses of powerful men in the kingdom. When the advisors to Isabella I, la Catolica, Enrique's successor, wished to discredit the king, they used the Portuguese "damas" as another instance of his immorality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 18 (2001): 43-52 Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

29. Record Number: 5721
Author(s): Landini, Roberta Orsi and Mary Westerman Bulgarella
Contributor(s):
Title : Costume in Fifteenth-Century Florentine Portraits of Women
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001. Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 47., ( 2002):  Pages 88 - 97.
Year of Publication: 2001.

30. Record Number: 4637
Author(s): Gibbons, Rachel C.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Queen as "Social Mannequin." Consumerism and Expenditure at the Court of Isabeau of Bavaria, 1393- 1422
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 26., 4 (December 2000):  Pages 371 - 395.
Year of Publication: 2000.

31. Record Number: 5448
Author(s): Bridgeman, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pagare le pompe: Why Quattrocento Sumptuary Laws Did Not Work [the author argues that given the very high costs for fabric, especially luxury fabrics, sumptuary laws were intended as a supplementary taxation on the wealthy; instead of forbidding costly attire, the system gave those of high status the opportunity to dress opulently by paying fines].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000.  Pages 209 - 226.
Year of Publication: 2000.

32. Record Number: 5532
Author(s): Heller, Sarah-Grace.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fashioning a Woman: The Vernacular Pygmalion in the "Roman de la Rose" ["As with conventions of rhetoric and erotic play, Jean de Meun's Pygmalion tale exploits conventional textile-acquiring and dressing fantasies, knowing that as conventions they appeal to readers. At the same time, he derides them, using hyperbole and the irony of the Pygmalion legend itself to expose the vain artifice that lurks behind the convention" Page 13].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 27., ( 2000):  Pages 1 - 18. Literacy and the Lay Reader
Year of Publication: 2000.

33. Record Number: 4446
Author(s): Killerby, Catherine Kovesi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Heralds of a Well-Instructed Mind: Nicolosa Sanuti's Defence of Women and Their Clothes [in the Appendix the author gives an English translation of Nicolosa Sanuti's protest against a new sumptuary law].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 13., 3 (September 1999):  Pages 255 - 282.
Year of Publication: 1999.

34. Record Number: 4334
Author(s): Kazhdan, Alexander P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women at Home [The author explores the question of women's separate quarters as well as other domestic issues].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 52 (1998): 1-17. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

35. Record Number: 2773
Author(s): Rath, Brigitte.
Contributor(s):
Title : Im Reich der Topoi. Nonnenleben im mittelalterlichen Österreich zwischen Norm und Praxis
Source: Homme: Zeitschrift für feministische Geschichtswissenschaft , 7., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 122 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1996.

36. Record Number: 6328
Author(s): Koch, Ursula.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Hierarchie der Frauen in merowingischer Zeit, beobachtet in Pleidelsheim (Kr. Ludwigsburg) und Klepsau (Hohenlohekreis)
Source: Königen, Klosterfrau, Bäuerin: Frauen im Frühmittelalter. Bericht zur dritten Tagung des Netzwerks archäologisch arbeitender Frauen 19.-22. Oktober 1995 in Kiel.   Edited by Helga Brandt and Julie K. Koch .   Agenda, 1996. Homme: Zeitschrift für feministische Geschichtswissenschaft , 7., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 29 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1996.

37. Record Number: 911
Author(s): Howell, Martha C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fixing Movables: Gifts by Testament in Late Medieval Douai [The personal goods that women bequeathed to family, friends, and the poor carried social meaning and economic value].
Source: Past and Present (Full Text via JSTOR) 150 (Feb. 1996): 3-45. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

38. Record Number: 6329
Author(s): Theune, Claudia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bemerkungen zu einer germanischen Trachtsitte der Merowingerzeit
Source: Königen, Klosterfrau, Bäuerin: Frauen im Frühmittelalter. Bericht zur dritten Tagung des Netzwerks archäologisch arbeitender Frauen 19.-22. Oktober 1995 in Kiel.   Edited by Helga Brandt and Julie K. Koch .   Agenda, 1996.  Pages 55 - 72.
Year of Publication: 1996.

39. Record Number: 1580
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Clothing and Gender Definition: Joan of Arc
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 26., 2 (Spring 1996):  Pages 297 - 319. Special Issue: Historical Inquiries/ Psychoanalytic Criticism/ Gender Studies
Year of Publication: 1996.

40. Record Number: 778
Author(s): Effros, Bonnie
Contributor(s):
Title : Symbolic Expressions of Sanctity: Gertrude of Nivelles in the Context of Merovingian Mortuary Custom
Source: Viator , 27., ( 1996):  Pages 1 - 10.
Year of Publication: 1996.

41. Record Number: 148
Author(s): Dufresne, Laura Rinaldi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan's "Treasure of the City of Ladies": A study of Dress and Social Hierarchy [in four illustrated manuscripts].
Source: Woman's Art Journal (Full Text via JSTOR)16, 2 (Fall 1995/ Winter 1996): 29-34. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

42. Record Number: 1356
Author(s): Skinner, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Possessions of Lombard Women in Italy [charters, wills, and dowry lists give evidence of women's moveable property including clothing, jewelry, furniture, tools, cooking utensils, and cloth].
Source: Medieval Life , 2., (Spring 1995):  Pages 8 - 11.
Year of Publication: 1995.

43. Record Number: 391
Author(s): Chapoutot- Remadi, Mounira.
Contributor(s):
Title : Femmes dans la Ville Mamluke
Source: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient , 38., 2 (May 1995):  Pages 145 - 164.
Year of Publication: 1995.

44. Record Number: 2844
Author(s): Winkelman, Johan H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Over de minnespreuken op recentlelijk ontdekte Tristan-schoentjes
Source: Amsterdamer Beiträge zur älteren Germanistik , ( 1995):  Pages 553 - 560.
Year of Publication: 1995.

45. Record Number: 2471
Author(s): Hudson, Vivian Kay.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clothing and Adornment Imagery in "The Scale of Perfection" : A Reflection of Contemplation
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 116 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1994.

46. Record Number: 16624
Author(s): Hughes, Diane Owen
Contributor(s):
Title : Mourning Rites, Memory, and Civilization in Premodern Italy [Diane Owen-Hughes argues that women's active role in mourning was a longstanding tradition of the Mediterranean and was frequently accomodated by Church officials. In late medieval Italy civic authorities acted to marginalize women's involvement by legislating their behavior, the kinds of mourning garb they could wear, and, in many cases, preventing even close female relatives from attending the funeral mass and burial. A male commemoration was given preference instead with men's funerary oratory and the new movement torward constructing elaborate tombs. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Riti e rituali nelle società medievali.   Edited by Jacques Chiffoleau, Lauro Martines, and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani .   Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 1994. Studies in Spirituality , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 23 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1994.

47. Record Number: 1814
Author(s): Lehtosalo- Hilander, Pirkko- Liisa.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bijoux et modes vestimentaires en Finlande à l'époque viking [women's dress, jewelry, and ornamentation].
Source: Proxima Thulé : revue d'études noriques , 1., (automne 1994):  Pages 111 - 121.
Year of Publication: 1994.

48. Record Number: 1550
Author(s): Garland, Lynda.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Eye of the Beholder: Byzantine Imperial Women and Their Public Image from Zoe Porphyrogenita to Euphrosyne Kamaterissa Doukaina (1028-1203) [analysis of the image and ceremonial role of empresses and women in the royal family based primarily on historians' accounts; empresses discussed include Zoe, Theodora, Aikaterina, Eudokia Makrembolitissa, Maria of Alania, Eirene, Anna Dalassena, Piroshka-Eirene, Bertha-Eirene of Sulzbach, and Mary of Antioch].
Source: Byzantion , 64., 1 ( 1994):  Pages 19 - 39. and Byzantion: Revue Internationale des Études Byzantines 64, 2 (1994): 261-313.
Year of Publication: 1994.

49. Record Number: 10523
Author(s): Hughes, Diane Owen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Regulating Women’s Fashion [Obsession with fashion was not seen as a particularly feminine problem until the twelfth century, when it became common to condemn women for their appetite for fancy clothing. As commerce in cloth increased, excessive clothing became increasingly associated with women. Governments enacted sumptuary laws (specifying what styles and colors of clothes one could wear) in order to fix social rank and status through clothing. Bourgeois women who were able to adopt rich array and change clothes according to recent fashion trends threatened social hierarchies. In the later Middle Ages clothing began to take on new meanings; it was seen not only as a mark of social status but as a sign of virtue or sin. Women often evaded the clothing constraints forced upon them, thereby reordering social distinctions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Studies in Spirituality , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 136 - 158.
Year of Publication: 1992.

50. Record Number: 9527
Author(s): Banner, Lois.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Fashionable Sex, 1100-1600 [The bodies of young men were often eroticized in late medieval and early modern Europe. Men’s clothing emphasized parts of the body associated with male sexuality and power, with shoes emphasizing the feet, fitted tights and trousers highlighting the legs, and codpieces drawing attention to the genitals. Clothing also indicated social class; for instance, poulaines (long, slender shoes) were associated with aristocrats and broad, short shoes with peasants. Changes in warfare and in social attitudes influenced evolving male fashions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: History Today , 42., (April 1992):  Pages 37 - 44.
Year of Publication: 1992.

51. Record Number: 10679
Author(s): Elliott, Dylan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dress as Mediator Between Inner and Outer Self: The Pious Matron of the High and Later Middle ages [Clothing often served as a saint's way of signifying the discrepancy between her percieved social standing (according to secular values) and her own individual selfhood (one based on spiritual beliefs). For married female saints, clothing was an even more complex form of symbolism as it often thwarted the wife's expected subordination to her husband while also projecting an image of virginity which was at odds with a married social persona. During the later Middle Ages, clergy began to endorse efforts to restrict the clothing of laywomen in order to maintain husbands' supremacy over their pious wives. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):  Pages 279 - 308.
Year of Publication: 1991.

52. Record Number: 11225
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Relic, Some Pictures and the Mothers of Florence in the Late Fourteenth Century
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 30, 2 (1991): 91-99. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

53. Record Number: 11772
Author(s): Jochens, Jenny.
Contributor(s):
Title : Before the Male Gaze: The Absence of the Female Body in Old Norse [The essay studies Old Norse descriptions of corporeal beauty, focusing in particular on the role of clothing and hair. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Sex in the Middle Ages: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Joyce E. Salisbury .   Garland Publishing, 1991.  Pages 3 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1991.

54. Record Number: 12670
Author(s): Dufresne, Laura Rinaldi.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman of Excellent Character: A Case Study of Dress, Reputation, and the Changing Costume of Christine de Pizan in the Fifteenth Century [The author surveys fifteenth century manuscript representations of Christine de Pizan. During her lifetime in manuscripts prepared under her supervision, Christine is presented in modest dress as befits a scirbe and court author. This is in keeping with the message of "Le Trésor" which emphasizes proper conduct for women of every social group. Manuscripts from later in the century, however, give her greater authority by depicting her in furs, elaborate headdresses, and other fashions of contemporary high-born ladies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dress: Annual Journal of the Costume Society of America , 17., ( 1990):  Pages 104 - 117.
Year of Publication: 1990.

55. Record Number: 12734
Author(s): Barber, Charles.
Contributor(s):
Title : The imperial panels at San Vitale: a reconsideration [Two sixth century mosaics in the aspe of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy, depict the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I (on the left) and his wife Theodora (on the right). Although the Emperor and Empress appear to be represented identically (with purple clothing, haloes, and similar postures), other types of iconography in the panels differentiate the role and status of the figures according to their gender. The Emperor, flanked by priests and soldiers, carries objects that indicate his priestly and military roles. The Empress, dressed in more lavish clothing and jewels and enclosed in a depiction of architectural space, reflects Byzantine society’s legal and social relegation of women (even aristocratic ones) to the domestic sphere. Nonetheless, Theodora’s position in image (in the center with males on one side of her, females, on the other) places her at the boundary between the sexes, as a transgressive figure who straddles both public and private spheres. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 14., ( 1990):  Pages 19 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1990.

56. Record Number: 28763
Author(s):
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Title : Woman Kills a Would-Be Rapist and is Presented with his Belongings
Source: Dress: Annual Journal of the Costume Society of America , 17., ( 1990):
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57. Record Number: 28812
Author(s):
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Title : A Game of Backgammon
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/a/ab/Luttrell1.jpg/250px-Luttrell1.jpg
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58. Record Number:
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Title : Angry Wife
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f8/Israel_van_Meckenem_-_Das_b%C3%B6se_Weib.jpg/250px-Israel_van_Meckenem_-_Das_b%C3%B6se_Weib.jpg
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59. Record Number:
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Title : Scene for "Akathistos" Verse 23
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/5a/Psalti_Markov_Manastir.jpg/250px-Psalti_Markov_Manastir.jpg
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60. Record Number:
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Title : Linen Clothing
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61. Record Number: 32148
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Title : Jewish couples dancing together at a wedding to the accompaniment of musical instruments
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62. Record Number: 36983
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Title : Pellote of Leonor, Queen of Castile
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63. Record Number: 38495
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Title : Mary Magdalene, from the Braque Triptych
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64. Record Number: 39180
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Title : The Story of Griselda. Detail from Part II, Exile
Source:
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65. Record Number: 39181
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Title : Chemise of St Balthild
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66. Record Number: 39183
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Title : Abstinence Contrainte and Faux Semblant on their way to see Malebouche
Source:
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