Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


223 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 27618
Author(s): Farina, Lara
Contributor(s):
Title : Money, Books and Prayers: Anchoresses and Exchange in Thirteenth-century England [The author explores texts in the “Wooing Group,” analyzing the language of bargaining and exchange in the relationships the anchoress has both with Christ and her spiritual adviser. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women and Wealth in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Theresa Earenfight The New Middle Ages. .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.  Pages 171 - 185.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 28320
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Jefferson, Lisa, translator
Title : “Fee for the admission of a woman: Memorandum, received from Alice Corsmaker for a fee for admission to the Silkwomen’s craft – 6s. 8d.” [1420-1421, folio 78v. bis] [For other entries about silkwomen, see pages 286-287 (money paid to Isabelle Bally and Maud Denton for silk fringe, 1415-1416) and Volume 2, pages 1012-1013 (money from silkwoman Isabelle Flete for the new windows in the mercers’ hall (1456) and torches given by a silkwoman named Gedge (1464). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Medieval Account Books of the Mercers of London: An Edition and Translation. Volume 1   Edited by Lisa Jefferson .   Ashgate, 2009.  Pages 328 - 329.
Year of Publication: 2009.

3. Record Number: 24052
Author(s): Cuffel, Alexandra
Contributor(s):
Title : The Matter of Others: Menstrual Blood and Uncontrolled Semen in Thirteenth-Century Kabbalists' Polemic against Christians, "Bad" Jews, and Muslims [The author argues that Kabbalist writers viewed sexual impurities and intercourse with non-Jewish women with alarm. These sins made Jewish men the equivalent of menstruating women in terms of the pollution they brought their families and the Jewish community. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009.  Pages 249 - 284.
Year of Publication: 2009.

4. Record Number: 23908
Author(s): van Bavel, Bas and Oscar Gelderblom
Contributor(s):
Title : Land of Milk and Butter: The Economic Origins of Cleanliness in the Dutch Golden Age
Source: Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 606
Year of Publication: 2008.

5. Record Number: 13656
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Teaching Anchoritic Texts: The Shock of the Old [The author discusses texts written for anchoresses, various available editions, and their uses in the classroom. The appendix presents an edited extract in Middle English from "The Rule of a Recluse," the late medieval version of Aelred's letter to his sister, "De Institutione Inclusarum." Following the letter, there is a gloss translating the more difficult words in the Middle English text. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Approaching Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical Texts. Christianity and Culture: Issues in Teaching and Research Series, Volume 2.   Edited by Dee Dyas, Valerie Edden, and Roger Ellis .   D. S. Brewer, 2005. Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 131 - 143.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 12610
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Material and Symbolic Gift-Giving: Clothes in English and French Wills [The practice of bequeathing clothing to friends, relatives, and others in one’s will was common in late medieval and Early Modern England and France. Major differences in how clothing is dispensed in the wills arise not when one compares the gender of particular testators but the socioeconomic class of the individual. Among lower class people, items of clothing function as commodities (objects of use or value to be passed along), but for bourgeois and aristocratic people clothing carries both material and symbolic value. In these social classes, giving clothing can signify a sentimental attachment to a person or it can constitute a spiritual act of almsgiving. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 137 - 146.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 11023
Author(s): Crachiolo, Beth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing the Gendering of Violence: Female and Male Martyrs in the "South English Legendary" [The author argues that while male martyrs have a variety of roles to play in the church, women martyrs simply react to those around them, ranging from cruel suitors to unfeeling torturers. Crachiolo suggests that the audience saw the female body as an object of entertainment though the hagiographer intended the descriptions of torture as a denial of the material world in the favor of Christian spirituality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Great Effusion of Blood? Interpreting Medieval Violence.   Edited by Mark D. Meyerson, Daniel Thiery, and Oren Falk .   University of Toronto Press, 2004. Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 147 - 163.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 23752
Author(s): Holanie, Jean
Contributor(s):
Title : Apprenticeship Contract for Cecilia, Daughter of Johannes Petri: Folio 56v, dated 14 October 1327
Source: Medieval Notaries and their Acts: The 1327-1328 Register of Jean Holanie.   Edited by Kathryn L. Reyerson and Debra A. Salata Documents of Practice .   TEAMS (The Consortium for the Teaching of the Middle Ages), Medieval Institute Publications, 2004. Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 40
Year of Publication: 2004.

9. Record Number: 10851
Author(s): Mills, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing Face to Face: Troubled Looks in the Katherine Group [The author explores similarities between Lacanian gaze theory and two texts of the Katherine Group, "Hali Meidenhad" and "Sawles Warde." The anchoritic readers are asked to imagine a variety of positions from the panoptic virgin superior to the servant of God beset by Lechery. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 117 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2004.

10. Record Number: 14638
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Passion Cycle": Images to Contemplate and Imitate amid Clarissan "clausura" [The author argues that the passion cycle in the church of Santa Maria Donna Regina emphasized an "imitatio Mariae," a devotion to the Eucharist, and Franciscan concerns for female viewers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 129 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2004.

11. Record Number: 12608
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : “This Skill in a Woman is By No Means to Be Despised”: Weaving and the Gender Division of Labor in the Middle Ages [Throughout the Middle Ages, cloth production was a respectable and even prestigious occupation for women. Women’s work was often devalued in comparison to that of men, but cloth production had great cultural importance. While women involved in other professions (like brewsters) came to be perceived negatively as their participation in urban and commercial life increased, the respectability of women weavers endured. Men eventually assumed control over the commercial production and trade of cloth in the later Middle Ages, yet the idea of women’s weaving remained an important concept in literary texts and in society as a whole. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 89 - 104.
Year of Publication: 2004.

12. Record Number: 14093
Author(s): Goldberg, P. J. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Migration, Youth, and Gender in Later Medieval England [The author looks at English records from church courts and from taxation. He concludes that most migrants were young and travelled relatively short distances. In addition, women were more likely to move away from home than men. Goldberg adds that, while migration was a lifecycle phase for many young people, some individuals because of poverty were obligated to remain migrant servants or laborers all their lives. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Youth in the Middle Ages.   Edited by P. J. P. Goldberg and Felicity Riddy .   York Medieval Press in association with the Boydell Press, 2004. Journal of Economic History , 68., 2 ( 2008):  Pages 85 - 99.
Year of Publication: 2004.

13. Record Number: 8948
Author(s): Edsall, Mary Agnes.
Contributor(s):
Title : True Anchoresses are Called Birds: Asceticism as Ascent and the Purgative Mysticism of the "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 157 - 186.
Year of Publication: 2003.

14. Record Number: 8066
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Powers of Record, Powers of Example: Hagiography and Women's History [The author compares an Anglo-Norman hagiography collection from Campsey with the "Ancrene Wisse" and its associated "Katherine Group." While the "Ancrene Wisse" presents hagiography as romance, the Campsey manuscript presents many role models for women in which they act together in groups and inhabit an historical setting. The author argues that the collection represents a collectivity of noble women's interests in the areas of monasticism, ecclesiastic issues, and family. It is centered on East Anglia but has networks of connections running through England and the continent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 71 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2003.

15. Record Number: 10996
Author(s): de Vries, Joyce.
Contributor(s):
Title : Caterina Sforza's Portrait Medals: Power, Gender and Representation in the Italian Renaissance Court [Caterina Sforza ruled Forli and Imola after the murder of her husband. She commissioned a series of portrait medals that established her persona first as a noble young wife, then a widow-ruler, and finally as a triumphant regent. The medals use motifs associated with male political power to indicate her authority and success. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman's Art Journal , 24., 1 (Spring/Summer 2003):  Pages 23 - 28.
Year of Publication: 2003.

16. Record Number: 8065
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : With the Heat of the Hungry Heart : Empowerment and "Ancrene Wisse" [Watson presents his article in two parts. First he argues that the author of the "Ancrene Wisse" conceives of his anchoress readers as herioc figures whose difficult lives raise them above others and serve as a sign of the coming breakdown between clergy and laity. Secondly Watson looks at the influences the text had on later writings which were addressed to lay readers, frequently men. Title note supplied by Feminae. ].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Woman's Art Journal , 24., 1 (Spring/Summer 2003):  Pages 52 - 70.
Year of Publication: 2003.

17. Record Number: 11094
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse, Religious Reform and the Late Middle Ages [The author examines later Middle English texts that borrowed heavily from the "Ancrene Wisse." For the most part their authors were interested in adapting the anchoritic life for devout lay men and women. In some cases the texts have a pronounced puritan streak. The "Ancrene Wisse's" theme of living a life of perfection appealed to many reformist authors in fourteenth century England. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Woman's Art Journal , 24., 1 (Spring/Summer 2003):  Pages 197 - 226.
Year of Publication: 2003.

18. Record Number: 11660
Author(s): Dutton, Elisabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Textual Disunities and Ambiguities of "mise-en-page" in the Manuscripts Containing "Book to a Mother" ["Book to a Mother" is a compilation text in which a son discusses prayers and various teachings of the Church. It is frequently accompanied by other devotional pieces in its four surviving manuscript copies. Dutton presents a brief codicological analysis of the four manuscripts emphasizing scribal practices in handling divisions within texts and separations between texts. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 6., ( 2003):  Pages 149 - 159.
Year of Publication: 2003.

19. Record Number: 11086
Author(s): Savage, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Communal Authorship of "Ancrene Wisse" [Savage argues that the male cleric traditionally identified as the author of the "Ancrene Wisse" wrote out of his long experience with the three anchoress sisters and reacted to their comments and suggestions. The text should properly be considered to have been jointly authored. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 6., ( 2003):  Pages 45 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2003.

20. Record Number: 11095
Author(s): Dahood, Roger.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the Identities of Mary Salome [In the later Middle Ages Mary Salome was identified as the third woman at the tomb of Christ, although she is not directly in the Bible. By the twelfth century a tradition had grown that recognized three marriages for Anne, the mother of the Virgin Mary, and three daughter all named Mary, the Virgin, Mary Cleophas, and Mary Salome. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 6., ( 2003):  Pages 227 - 243.
Year of Publication: 2003.

21. Record Number: 11087
Author(s): Dance, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : The AB Language: The Recluse, the Gossip, and the Language Historian [The AB language is the dialect of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the "Katherine Group." It came from the Herefordshire/Shropshire area. In style and vocabulary it combines the homespun with the learned. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 6., ( 2003):  Pages 57 - 82.
Year of Publication: 2003.

22. Record Number: 11093
Author(s): von Nolcken, Christina.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Recluse" and Its Readers: Some Observations on a Lollard Interpolated Version of "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 6., ( 2003):  Pages 175 - 196.
Year of Publication: 2003.

23. Record Number: 11091
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Savoring "Scienta": The Medieval Anchoress Reads "Ancrene Wisse" [The author explores the reading experience that the "Ancrene Wisse" afforded the anchoress. Though intended as a guide book, it also encouraged the devout reader to experience Christ's life and thus transcend the limits of the anchorhold. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 6., ( 2003):  Pages 113 - 144.
Year of Publication: 2003.

24. Record Number: 9637
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : This Living Hand: Thirteenth-Century Female Literacy, Materialist Immanence, and the Reader of the "Ancrene Wisse" [The author first surveys the manuscripts of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the languages that early readers would have used. Then she analyzes the broadly historical context of thirteenth century female religious readers. In the final section, Robertson focuses
Source: Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 1 - 36. Abridged version published in Medieval Literature: Criticism and Debates. Edited by Holly A. Crocker and D. Vance Smith. Routledge, 2014. Pages 162-179.
Year of Publication: 2003.

25. Record Number: 11092
Author(s): Innes-Parker, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Legacy of "Ancrene Wisse ": Translations, Adaptations, Influences, and Audience, with Special Attention to Women Readers [The author traces the adaptations and echoes of the "Ancrene Wisse" in fourteenth and fifteenth century vernacular devotional literature. In looking at manuscript ownership and wills, Innes-Parker finds circles of reading among religious and lay women. Surprisingly the most innovative texts quickly found their way into women's possession. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 145 - 173.
Year of Publication: 2003.

26. Record Number: 11085
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Genre of "Ancrene Wisse" [The author traces the sources that influenced the "Ancrene Wisse," beginning with Augustine's "libellus" of practical and spiritual advice through the near-contemporary Domincan adaptations of the Premonstratensian customary. Millett also signals the influence of the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 which would have made the "Ancrene Wisse" author more leery of encouraging new religious orders as well as taking on the pastoral care of religious women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 29 - 44.
Year of Publication: 2003.

27. Record Number: 11090
Author(s): Edwards, A. S. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Middle English Manuscripts and Early Readers of "Ancrene Wisse" [The author describes nine surviving manuscripts which include Middle English versions of the "Ancrene Wisse." Edwards also notes the marginal comments made by sixteenth and seventeenth century churchmen and antiquarians. Title not supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 103 - 112.
Year of Publication: 2003.

28. Record Number: 11089
Author(s): Trotter, D. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anglo-French Lexis of "Ancrene Wisse": A Re-evaluation [The author argues that the text of the "Ancrene Wisse" demonstrates at a very early period a high number of Anglo-French loan words as well as the combination of Anglo-French morphemes, e.g. turpelnesse (Anglo-French stem with Middle English verb ending). This familiarity shows the depth of language contact in England at the beginning of the thirteenth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 83 - 101.
Year of Publication: 2003.

29. Record Number: 8072
Author(s): Rees Jones, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Influence on the Design of Urban Homes [The author argues that home ownership was more important to women than to men. Houses provided security, status, and a means for earning income. The physical environment of the home shaped the bourgeois ideal of female domesticity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 190 - 211.
Year of Publication: 2003.

30. Record Number: 6198
Author(s): Archer, Janice
Contributor(s):
Title : Watching Women Work in Late Thirteenth-Century Paris: Official and Unofficial Visibility
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):
Year of Publication: 2002.

31. Record Number: 11032
Author(s): Davis, Isabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Consuming the Body of the Working Man in the Later Middle Ages [The author argues for a more nuanced reading of the working man's body. Davis cites literary texts in which the male peasant is associated with food and sustenance while other texts emphasize the pain and bodily disfigurement that the work brings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. Magistra , 8., 1 (Summer 2002):  Pages 42 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2002.

32. Record Number: 6635
Author(s): Warren, Ann K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virginal Effects: Text and Identity in "Ancrene Wisse" [The author argues that the anchoritic construction of virginity is mainly dependent on language which makes visible an "inner" core].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 36 - 48.
Year of Publication: 2002.

33. Record Number: 6612
Author(s): Walker, Alicia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Myth and Magic in Early Byzantine Marriage Jewelry: The Persistence of Pre-Christian Traditions [the author argues that early Byzantine marriage rings were intended to promote and protect marital harmony; "In contrast to the marriage belt from the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and the belt buckle from the Metropolitan Museum, Byzantine marriage rings do not express an overt association with pagan traditions. But, the resonance of their inscriptions with pagan magical texts may still indicate a perpetuation, on some level, of non-Christian practices and beliefs within the social context of Byzantine marriage." p. 69]
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 59 - 78.
Year of Publication: 2002.

34. Record Number: 7253
Author(s): Gerát, Ivan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dei saturitas. St. Elizabeth's Works of Mercy in the Medieval Pictorial Narrative ["In this article, I examine a significant and unknown part of the pictorial tradition that surrounds St. Elizabeth in Central Europe and concentrate, in particular, on one group of scenes which can be generally referred to as her works of mercy. The significant questions of identity and differences within this group are analyzed. Some aspcts of these scenes changed very subtly; I evaluate these differences in relation to their historical context and consider how they reflected the development of liturgical and devotional practices. The main focus of this paper, however, is an evaluation of the theory that pictorial images of St. Elizabeth may be in imitation of those representing Christ." Page 168.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 168 - 181.
Year of Publication: 2002.

35. Record Number: 11057
Author(s): Conlon, Lynda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Medieval Dublin: Their Legal Rights and Economic Power [The author surveys women's activities in three areas: the ability to control and bequeath land, the practice of using wills to give possessions and property to family and friends, and opportunities to participate in the workforce (particularly in regard to brewing and guilds). Conlon argues that in all of these areas women sometimes had some power but there were usually restrictions and conditions placed upon them due to their gender. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Dublin IV: proceedings of the Friends of Medieval Dublin Symposium 2002.   Edited by Seán Duffy .   Four Courts, 2002. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 172 - 192.
Year of Publication: 2002.

36. Record Number: 7133
Author(s): Salih, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queering "Sponsalia Christi": Virginity, Gender, and Desire in the Early Middle English Anchoritic Texts [The author examines virginity, in particular the image of the bride of Christ, in the Katherine Group and "Wohunge of Ure Lauerd." She argues that the sexualization in the text does not imply heterosexualization but an eroticism that emphasizes likeness, sometimes both masculine with images of power and sometimes both feminine with images of beauty. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: New Medieval Literatures , 5., ( 2002):  Pages 155 - 175.
Year of Publication: 2002.

37. Record Number: 6639
Author(s): Gill, Miriam.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Piety and Impiety: Selected Images of Women in Wall Paintings in England After 1300 [The author examines paintings on three themes: Saint Anne teaching the Virgin to read, the warning to gossips, and the seven corporal works of mercy; the three mural subjects all comment on desirable female behavior].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002. New Medieval Literatures , 5., ( 2002):  Pages 101 - 120.
Year of Publication: 2002.

38. Record Number: 8306
Author(s): Gunn, Cate.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse: A Modern Lay Person's Guide to a Medieval Religious Text [The author argues that the "Ancrene Wisse" needs to be read carefully with reference to its historical context, modern scholarly theories, and spiritual environment. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Magistra , 8., 1 (Summer 2002):  Pages 3 - 25.
Year of Publication: 2002.

39. Record Number: 11035
Author(s): McAvoy, Liz Herbert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ant Nes He Him Seolf Reclus i Maries Wombe?: Julian of Norwich, the Anchorhold, and Redemption of the Monstrous Female Body [The author explores the themes of suffering and enclosure as characteristically feminine phenomena which gave anchoresses access to the divine. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. Magistra , 8., 1 (Summer 2002):  Pages 128 - 143.
Year of Publication: 2002.

40. Record Number: 11036
Author(s): Evans, Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Devil in Disguise: Perverse Female Origins of the Nation [The author examines the connections among women's sexuality, demons and the supernatural, and the myths of the origins of nations. The Latin translation of the story of Albina and her sisters, the discoverers of Britain who had sex with giants, is the text that Evans first analyzes. However, she also briefly considers "Sir Orfeo," "Wife of Bath's Tale," and the York Play, "Joseph's Trouble about Mary." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. Magistra , 8., 1 (Summer 2002):  Pages 182 - 195.
Year of Publication: 2002.

41. Record Number: 10209
Author(s): Laiou, Angeliki E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in the Marketplace of Constantinople 10th - 14th Centuries [The author surveys the evidence for women's activities in the market as hawkers, shop owners, investors, textile workers, and other roles. Laiou also explores the links between these economic activities and both dowry and family networks. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine Constantinople: Monuments, Topography, and Everyday Life.   Edited by Nevra Necipoglu. The Medieval Mediterranean: Peoples, Economies, and Cultures, 400-1453, Volume 33 Medieval Mediterranean, 33.   Brill, 2001.  Pages 261 - 273.
Year of Publication: 2001.

42. Record Number: 6067
Author(s): Mortimer, Julia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reflections in "The Myroure of Oure Ladye": The Translation of a Desiring Body [the author analyzes a number of Brigittine texts, in particular the "Myroure of Oure Ladye" written for the nuns at Syon; the author notes the efforts made to minimize Bridget's individual voice and the instances where Bridget identifies herself with the Virgin Mary's experiences through dissolving body boundaries].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 27., 2 (June 2001):  Pages 58 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2001.

43. Record Number: 7867
Author(s): Hatcher, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Debate: "Women's Work Reconsidered: Gender and Wage Differentiation in Late Medieval England" [The author responds to Sandy Bardsley's article "Women's Work Reconsidered," "Past and Present," 165 (November 1999): 3-29. He argues that differences in wage rates for men and women in agricultural work was based on some men's greater strength and height. Furthermore he suggests that the weight of custom was less heavy in rural labor markets where women's work was needed and valued. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Past and Present , 173., (November 2001):  Pages 191 - 202.
Year of Publication: 2001.

44. Record Number: 7868
Author(s): Bardsley, Sandy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reply [The author replies to John Hatcher's critique ("Debate: 'Women's Work Reconsidered: Gender and Wage Differentiation in Late Medieval England,'" "Past and Present," 173 (November 2001): 191-202) of her article ("Women's Work Reconsidered," "Past and Present," 165 (November 1999): 3-29). She offers three reservations about his argument: 1) Strength is not the only factor for physical labor; Hatcher did not consider stamina; 2) The gap between men's and women's wages persists even in areas that rely less or not at all on physical strength ; 3) Gaps between women's and men's wages vary over time and place. The author concludes by affirming that gender was a factor in determining wages in rural late medieval England. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Past and Present , 173., (November 2001):  Pages 199 - 202.
Year of Publication: 2001.

45. Record Number: 6165
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Efter the Measse-Cos, Hwen the Preost Sacred: When is the Moment of Ecstasy in "Ancrene Wisse" [The author examines a passage in the "Ancrene Wisse" concerning the respect that the anchoress should show to the host and the presence of Christ].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 2001):  Pages 105 - 108.
Year of Publication: 2001.

46. Record Number: 6422
Author(s): Cohen, Adam S. and Anne Derbes
Contributor(s):
Title : Bernward and Eve at Hildesheim
Source: Gesta , 40., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 19 - 38.
Year of Publication: 2001.

47. Record Number: 6851
Author(s): Narbona-Cárceles, María.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman at Court: A Prosopographic Study of the Court of Carlos III of Navarre (1387-1425) [The appendix lists the 364 women investigated along with their positions at court. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 22., ( 2001):  Pages 31 - 64.
Year of Publication: 2001.

48. Record Number: 5967
Author(s): Farmer, Sharon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poor Men, the Stigma of Poverty, and the Burdens of Masculinity
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Medieval Prosopography , 22., ( 2001):
Year of Publication: 2001.

49. Record Number: 6084
Author(s): Laity, K. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : False Positives: The "Katherine Group" Saints as Ambiguous Role Models [The author argues that the writer of the saints' lives in the "Katherine Group" emphasized torture and physical pain in order to instill fear in the young religious women who made up the text's audience].
Source: Magistra , 7., 2 (Winter 2001):  Pages 64 - 99.
Year of Publication: 2001.

50. Record Number: 6925
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Miroir des bonnes Femmes": Not for Women Only? ["To read the 'Miroir des bonnes femmes' as relating only to women, therefore, would be to misunderstand its role in the formation of new ideologies during the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. The conjunction of female-based rhetoric, familial identities, and the promise of social advancement through proper conduct marks the first stage of a distinctive bourgeois ideology that will be fully articulated and culturally dominant by the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Despite the assumption, perhaps, on the part of conduct book owners that they are justifying a claim to 'noble' rank, it is in bourgeois culture that female honor is made the symbolic basis of a family's social reputation. As they cultivated that reputation and fostered a process of social advancement, fathers as well as their daughters therefore had a vital interest in owning conduct texts addressed to women." p. 102].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Magistra , 7., 2 (Winter 2001):  Pages 86 - 105.
Year of Publication: 2001.

51. Record Number: 8549
Author(s): Amsler, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affective Literacy: Gestures of Reading in the Later Middle Ages [The author uses "affective literacy" to mean the ways people develop emotional, gestural, and other physical relationships with texts. He argues that the "Ancrene Wisse" regulated its readers' devotional, physical, and affective behaviors. Transgressive literacy, in which readers touched or kissed images, gave them a relationship with sacred texts which came close to that of clerics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies: Proceeding of the Illinois Medieval Association (Full Text via Project Muse) 18 (2001): 83-110 Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

52. Record Number: 4874
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Documenting Medieval Women's Medical Practice [Originally published in "Practical Medicine from Salerno to the Black Death." Edited by Luis Garcia-Ballester, et al. Cambridge University Press, 1994.]
Source: Women's Healthcare in the Medieval West: Texts and Contexts.   Edited by Monica H. Green Variorum Collected Studies Series, 680.   Ashgate Publishing, 2000.  Pages 322 - 352. Originally published in "Practical Medicine from Salerno to the Black Death." Edited by Luis Garcia-Ballester, et al. Cambridge University Press, 1994.
Year of Publication: 2000.

53. Record Number: 5450
Author(s): Tinagli, Paola.
Contributor(s):
Title : Womanly Virtues in Quattrocento Florentine Marriage Furnishings [the author examines how behavioral ideals for both new husbands and wives, as represented on cassoni, spalliere, and other furnishings given to the bridal couple, emphasized chastity, restraint, and other virtues that contributed to a well-ordered civic society].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000.  Pages 265 - 284.
Year of Publication: 2000.

54. Record Number: 5866
Author(s): Galloway, Penelope.
Contributor(s):
Title : Life, Learning, and Wisdom: The Forms and Functions of Beguine Education [the author briefly considers the kinds of education offered to young students in beguinages in Douai and Lille; she goes on to consider the many different responsibilities that beguines had to undertake in the urban economy, from accountants to landlords and nurses to traders in cloth; the variety of jobs and extent of beguine economic success argue for a very good system of training and education for the beguines themselves].
Source: Medieval Monastic Education.   Edited by George Ferzoco and Carolyn Muessig .   Leicester University Press, 2000.  Pages 153 - 167.
Year of Publication: 2000.

55. Record Number: 5459
Author(s): Selman, Rebecca.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spirituality and Sex Change: "Horologium sapientiae" and "Speculum devotorum" [The author argues that the "Speculum devotorum" was written for women; the intended readers, possibly Bridgettine nuns, were presented with the figures of Mary and Bridget as models].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 63 - 79.
Year of Publication: 2000.

56. Record Number: 5457
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the Book of Hours [the author argues that the instructions for devotions in the "Ancrene Wisse" represent a middle stage between monastic practice and the Book of Hours, the "breviary for the use of the laity;" the Appendix reproduces an excerpt from the "Ancrene Wisse" and from the early Dominican Constitution dealing with the instructions for saying Matins].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 21 - 40.
Year of Publication: 2000.

57. Record Number: 4811
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fashioning the Puritan Gentry-Woman's Devotion and Dissent in "Book to a Mother" [The author argues that the son who wrote a devotional text for his mother was a priest or friar who was angry about the corruption in the Church; he joined the worlds of devotion and religious dissent together].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000.  Pages 169 - 184.
Year of Publication: 2000.

58. Record Number: 8550
Author(s): Edmunds, Sheila.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Life and Work of Clara Hatzlerin [Hatzlerin was a scribe in Augsburg who has nine signed surviving manuscripts. She lived with her brother, a notary, and was commissioned to produce books for wealthy citizens. The article concludes with a descriptive catalog of her nine known manuscripts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 2., ( 1999):  Pages 1 - 25.
Year of Publication: 1999.

59. Record Number: 8551
Author(s): Edmunds, Sheila.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anna Rügerin Revealed [The author argues that Anna actually printed the two books with her colophon. Rügerin had a family network involved in the printing trade. The author identifies Rügerin's brother as the printer Johann Schönsperger. Furthermore her mother, Barbara Traut Schönsperger, married the printer Johann Bämler as her second husband. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 2., ( 1999):  Pages 179 - 181.
Year of Publication: 1999.

60. Record Number: 3952
Author(s): Smith, Kathryn A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Neville of Hornby Hours and the Design of Literate Devotion
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 81,1 (March 1999): 72-92. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

61. Record Number: 7364
Author(s): Devroey, Jean-Pierre.
Contributor(s):
Title : Femmes au mirroir des polyptyques: une approche des rapports du couple dans l'exploitation rurale dépendante entre Seine et Rhin au IXe siècle [The author argues that the history of women can only be fully understood when it is considered along with the history of men. Using ninth century polyptiques, the author analyzes women's and men's roles for peasants, serfs, and the unfree. He also suggests reasons for the smaller numbes of women and larger numbers of men in the rural populations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Femmes et pouvoirs des femmes à Byzance et en Occident (VIe -XIe siècles). Colloque international organisé les 28, 29 et 30 mars 1996 à Bruxelles et Villeneuve d'Ascq.   Edited by Stéphane Lebecq, Alain Dierkens, Régine Le Jan, and Jean-Marie Sansterre .   Centre de Recherche sur l'Histoire de l'Europe du Nord-Ouest, Université Charles de Gaulle-Lille 3, 1999.  Pages 227 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1999.

62. Record Number: 5298
Author(s): Levin, William R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lost Children, a Working Mother, and the Progress of an Artist at the Florentine Misericordia in the Trecento [The author explores Ambrogio di Baldese's connections with the Misericordia confraternity and its shelter for abandoned children; Ambrogio's mother, Santina, had cared for the children before her son took over the responsibility].
Source: Publications of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 6., ( 1999):  Pages 34 - 84.
Year of Publication: 1999.

63. Record Number: 4002
Author(s): Bardsley, Sandy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Work Reconsidered: Gender and Wage Differentiation in Late Medieval England [the author argues that women peasants were paid at the same rate as other members of the "second rate" work force, namely boys, old men, and the infirm; the author finds no difference in women's wages after the Black Death, they still received around 70% of adult men's wages.]
Source: Past and Present (Full Text via JSTOR) 165 (November 1999): 3-29. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

64. Record Number: 4273
Author(s): Chewning, Susannah Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Paradox of Virginity within the Anchoritic Tradition: The Masculine Gaze and the Feminine Body in the "Wohunge" Group
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999.  Pages 113 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1999.

65. Record Number: 3940
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Household Economy in the Preindustrial Period: An Assessment of "Women, Work, and Family" [The author reassesses the work of Louise A. Tilly and Joan W. Scott, "Women, Work, and Family" (1978) in terms of recent scholarship on medieval women's economic contributions].
Source: Journal of Women's History (Full Text via Project Muse) 11, 3 (Autumn 1999): 10-16. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

66. Record Number: 3736
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Vie Seinte Osith": Hagiography and Politics in Anglo-Norman England [The author argues that Saint Osyth acts in a system in which lordship is the model; her canons can expect protection and maintenance in return for loyal service].
Source: Studies in Philology , 96., 4 (Fall 1999):  Pages 367 - 393.
Year of Publication: 1999.

67. Record Number: 3769
Author(s): McRee, Benjamin R. and Trisha K. Dent
Contributor(s):
Title : Working Women in the Medieval City [The authors provide an introductory overview, touching on specific occupations (servants, petty retailing, textile manufacture, healing, and prostitution) and on the regional and chronological variations].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999.  Pages 241 - 256.
Year of Publication: 1999.

68. Record Number: 3758
Author(s): Hettinger, Madonna J.
Contributor(s):
Title : So Strategize: The Demands in the Day of the Peasant Woman in Medieval Europe [an introductory overview].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999. Studies in Philology , 96., 4 (Fall 1999):  Pages 47 - 63.
Year of Publication: 1999.

69. Record Number: 3757
Author(s): Hanawalt, Barbara A. and Anna Dronzek
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Medieval Urban Society [The authors provide an introductory overview touching on childhood and education, marriage and remarriage, motherhood, and participation in the work force].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999.  Pages 31 - 45.
Year of Publication: 1999.

70. Record Number: 3170
Author(s): Farmer, Sharon.
Contributor(s):
Title : It is not good that [wo]man should be alone: Elite Responses to Singlewomen in High Medieval Paris [because both clerical and lay elites expected women to submit to male authority, whether that of a husband or of a male cleric, single women are ignored].
Source: Singlewomen in the European Past, 1250-1800.   Edited by Judith M. Bennett and Amy M. Froide .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999. Studies in Philology , 96., 4 (Fall 1999):  Pages 82 - 105.
Year of Publication: 1999.

71. Record Number: 4272
Author(s): Salih, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing Virginity: Sex and Violence in the "Katherine" Group
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Studies in Philology , 96., 4 (Fall 1999):  Pages 95 - 112.
Year of Publication: 1999.

72. Record Number: 4405
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the Conditions of Confession [the author traces the development of the conditions of confession in the twelfth century in order to evaluate its presentation in the "Ancrene Wisse;" she concludes that the "Ancrene Wisse"'s uniqueness is to be found in its expansion of the conditions of confession with non-scriptural "exempla" and other borrowings].
Source: English Studies , 80., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 193 - 215.
Year of Publication: 1999.

73. Record Number: 4310
Author(s): Grise, C. Annette.
Contributor(s):
Title : In the Blessid Vyneyerd of Oure Holy Saueour : Female Religious Readers and Textual Reception in the "Myroure of Oure Ladye" and the "Orcherd of Syon" [The author argues that the two devotional works that come from Syon emphasized the ideal reader, whether lay or religious, as someone who was as meek, obedient, submissive, and devout as a nun from Syon].
Source: The Medieval Mystical Tradition England, Ireland, and Wales. Exeter Symposium VI. Papers read at Charney Manor, July 1999.   Edited by Marion Glasscoe .   D. S. Brewer, 1999. English Studies , 80., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 380 - 381.
Year of Publication: 1999.

74. Record Number: 3174
Author(s): Wiesner, Merry E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Having Her Own Smoke: Employment and Independence for Singlewomen in Germany, 1400-1750
Source: Singlewomen in the European Past, 1250-1800.   Edited by Judith M. Bennett and Amy M. Froide .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999. English Studies , 80., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 192 - 216.
Year of Publication: 1999.

75. Record Number: 3744
Author(s): Goldberg, P. J. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Masters and Men in Later Medieval England
Source: Masculinity in Medieval Europe.   Edited by D.M. Hadley .   Women and Men in History Series. Addison Wesley Longman, 1999. English Studies , 80., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 56 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1999.

76. Record Number: 4029
Author(s): Goldberg, P. J. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pigs and Prostitutes: Streetwalking in Comparative Perspective [The author compares late medieval English practice with the southern European approach of the civic brothel].
Source: Young Medieval Women.   Edited by Katherine J. Lewis, Noel James Menuge, and Kim M. Phillips .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. English Studies , 80., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 172 - 193.
Year of Publication: 1999.

77. Record Number: 3635
Author(s): Rouhi, Leyla.
Contributor(s):
Title : Y Otros Treynta Officios: The Definition of a Medieval Women's Work in "Celestina" [the author argues that Celestina is described by others as having several occupations or as having an occupation too difficult to describe; the author suggests that this condition characterizes women's work in general in which many of them had multi-professional activities].
Source: Celestinesca , 22., 2 (Otoño 1998):  Pages 21 - 31.
Year of Publication: 1998.

78. Record Number: 3011
Author(s): McKee, Sally.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women Under Venetian Colonial Rule in the Early Renaissance: Observations on Their Economic Activities
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 51, 1 (Spring 1998): 34-67. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

79. Record Number: 3632
Author(s): Ruiz, Teófilo E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Work and Daily Life in Late Medieval Castile [The author analyzes conditions both in urban and rural Castile, looking in particular at the peasantry and at the artisan class].
Source: Women at Work in Spain: From the Middle Ages to Early Modern Times.   Edited by Marilyn Stone and Carmen Benito-Vessels .   Peter Lang, 1998.  Pages 101 - 120.
Year of Publication: 1998.

80. Record Number: 3631
Author(s): Levine Melammed, Renée
Contributor(s):
Title : Castilian "Conversas" at Work [The author argues that judaizing "conversas" observed the Sabbath, Jewish holidays, and dietary laws; all of these observations required work which brought the women to the attention of the Inquisition].
Source: Women at Work in Spain: From the Middle Ages to Early Modern Times.   Edited by Marilyn Stone and Carmen Benito-Vessels .   Peter Lang, 1998.  Pages 81 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1998.

81. Record Number: 5027
Author(s): Szende, Katalin G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Other Half of the Town: Women in Private, Professional, and Public Life in Two Towns of Late Medieval Western Hungary
Source: East Central Europe , 1 ( 1998):  Pages 171 - 190. Women and Power in East Central Europe - Medieval and Modern. Edited by Marianne Sághy.
Year of Publication: 1998.

82. Record Number: 5993
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Sephardi Women in the Medieval and Early Modern Periods [The author provides a brief overview of women's lives in the Iberian peninsula with an emphasis on sources and the current state of research in the field].
Source: Jewish Women in Historical Perspective.   Edited by Judith R. Baskin .   Second edition. Wayne State University Press, 1998. East Central Europe , 1 ( 1998):  Pages 128 - 149.
Year of Publication: 1998.

83. Record Number: 3629
Author(s): Borrero Fernández, Mercedes.
Contributor(s):
Title : Peasant and Aristocratic Women: Their role in the Rural Economy of Seville at the End of the Middle Ages
Source: Women at Work in Spain: From the Middle Ages to Early Modern Times.   Edited by Marilyn Stone and Carmen Benito-Vessels .   Peter Lang, 1998. East Central Europe , 1 ( 1998):  Pages 11 - 31.
Year of Publication: 1998.

84. Record Number: 2999
Author(s): Farmer, Sharon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Down and Out and Female in Thirteenth-Century Paris
Source: American Historical Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 103, 2 (April 1998): 344-372. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

85. Record Number: 2974
Author(s): Cohn, Samuel K., Jr.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Work in Renaissance Italy
Source: Gender and Society in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Judith C. Brown and Robert C. Davis .   Longman, 1998.  Pages 107 - 126.
Year of Publication: 1998.

86. Record Number: 3109
Author(s): Warren, Nancy Bradley.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pregnancy and Productivity: The Imagery of Female Monasticism Within and Beyond the Cloister Walls [drawing on the exemplum of the Pregnant Abbess and the didactic work, "Book to a Mother, " the author argues that they strive to control women's productivity and regulate women's use of property; the Brigittine Order provides a counter example which encourages women's productivity, values women's work, and legitimates women's rights to control material resources]
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 28., 3 (Fall 1998):  Pages 531 - 552.
Year of Publication: 1998.

87. Record Number: 3507
Author(s): Parsons, John Carmi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Que Nos in Infancia Lactauit: The Impact of Childhood Care-Givers on Plantagenet Family Relationships in the Thirteenth and Early Fourteenth Centuries [topics discussed include the concern of the royal parents, the efforts made to integrate children into their birth families, and the loyalty adult children felt for their caregivers and their families].
Source: Women, Marriage, and Family in Medieval Christendom: Essays in Memory of Michael M. Sheehan, C.S.B.   Edited by Constance M. Rousseau and Joel T. Rosenthal .   Western Michigan University, 1998. Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 28., 3 (Fall 1998):  Pages 289 - 324.
Year of Publication: 1998.

88. Record Number: 7172
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Stabant matres dolorosae: Women as Readers and Writers of Passion Prayers, Meditations, and Visions [The author surveys late medieval writings on Christ's passion from Richard Rolle, the anonymous "Faits and the Passion of our Lord Jesu Christ," Eleanor Hull's translation, Margery Kempe, and Julian of Norwich. With the exception of the last author, the writers all aim at generating strong emotions in order to prompt contrition and reformed behavior. Only Julian emphasizes the joy and love of the Passion and encourages her reader to contemplate new ideas through positive theological metaphors. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Broken Body: Passion Devotion in Late-Medieval Culture.   Edited by A. A. MacDonald, H. N. B. Ridderbos, and R. M. Schlusemann .   Mediaevalia Groningana, vol. 21. Egbert Forsten, 1998. Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 28., 3 (Fall 1998):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1998.

89. Record Number: 2705
Author(s): Lachaussée, Geneviève.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'Influence du "Miroir des simples âmes anéanties" de Marguerite Porete sur la pensée de l'auteur anonyme du "Nuage d'inconnaissance" [Marguerite Porete's influence on the author of the "Cloud" is traced through five themes: desire and free will, renunciation, knowledge of God, the sinner, and salvation through Christ].
Source: Recherches de Théologie et Philosophie Médiévales , 64., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 385 - 399.
Year of Publication: 1997.

90. Record Number: 3509
Author(s): Savage, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Solitary Heroine: Aspects of Meditation and Mysticism in "Ancrene Wisse," the Katherine Group, and the Wooing Group
Source: Mysticism and Spirituality in Medieval England.   Edited by William F. Pollard and Robert Boenig .   D.S. Brewer, 1997. Recherches de Théologie et Philosophie Médiévales , 64., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 63 - 83.
Year of Publication: 1997.

91. Record Number: 2560
Author(s): Taralon, Jean
Contributor(s): Taralon-Carlini, Dominique, avec la collaboration de
Title : La Majesté d' or de Sainte Foy de Conques [see the accompanying article #2561 on the statue's crown].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 11 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1997.

92. Record Number: 2561
Author(s): Taralon, Jean
Contributor(s): Taralon-Carlini, Dominique, avec la collaboration de
Title : La Couronne [see the accompanying article #2560 on the statue].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 61 - 77.
Year of Publication: 1997.

93. Record Number: 2270
Author(s): Chewning, Susannah Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mysticism and the Anchoritic Community: "A Time... of Veiled Infinity" [suggests that the author's persona presented in the "Wohunge" is feminine and that mystical texts are acts of feminine writing irrespective of the sex of the author].
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997. Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 116 - 137.
Year of Publication: 1997.

94. Record Number: 2420
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Eunuchs Who Keep the Sabbath: Becoming Male and the Ascetic Ideal in Thirteenth-Century Jewish Mysticism
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 151 - 185.
Year of Publication: 1997.

95. Record Number: 1592
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Mirrors of a Collective Past: Re-considering Images of Medieval Women [looks at the visual evidence provided by manuscript illuminations and paintings for women readers and women workers including bath attendants and midwives].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 75 - 93.
Year of Publication: 1997.

96. Record Number: 2413
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Body Doubles: Producing the Masculine "Corpus" [survey of varous images of the male medieval body as producer, laborer, moneymaker, and sodomite].
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 3 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1997.

97. Record Number: 2459
Author(s): Martindale, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Theodolinda: The Fifteenth-Century Recollection of a Lombard Queen [analysis of Theodolinda's meaning for the late medieval period, based on the art in the Theodolinda Chapel, the Cathedral's treasures associated with the queen, and the accounts by the fourteenth century chronicler Bonincontro and the eighth century historian, Paul the Deacon].
Source: The church retrospective: papers read at the 1995 Summer Meeting and the 1996 Winter Meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society.   Edited by R. N. Swanson Studies in Church History, 33.  1997. Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 195 - 225.
Year of Publication: 1997.

98. Record Number: 2407
Author(s): Bennett, Judith M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Confronting Continuity [argues that the medieval period saw much change in women's lives but little transformation in their status in relation to men].
Source: Journal of Women's History 9, 3 (Autumn 1997): 73-94.
Year of Publication: 1997.

99. Record Number: 1973
Author(s): Innes-Parker, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Subversion and Conformity in Julian's "Revelation": Authority, Vision, and the Motherhood of God [in part compares images of motherhood in Julian with those in "Ancrene Wisse" and "The Chastising of God's Children"].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 23., 2 (June 1997):  Pages 7 - 35.
Year of Publication: 1997.

100. Record Number: 2487
Author(s): Driver, Martha W. and Deborah McGrady
Contributor(s):
Title : Teaching About Women with Multimedia [descriptions of a multimedia study program, a website, and student-created web projects for classes in medieval women's history and in medieval women and literature].
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 23., (Spring 1997):  Pages 21 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1997.

101. Record Number: 2444
Author(s): Woolf, Alex.
Contributor(s):
Title : At home in the Long Iron Age: A Dialogue Between Households and Individuals in Cultural Reproduction [sketch of household relations, with an emphasis on the similarities in conditions of wives and slaves; also considers what material evidence is available for this period in Northern Europe].
Source: Invisible People and Processes: Writing Gender and Childhood into European Archaeology.   Edited by Jenny Moore and Eleanor Scott .   Leicester University Press, 1997. Mystics Quarterly , 23., 2 (June 1997):  Pages 68 - 74.
Year of Publication: 1997.

102. Record Number: 2136
Author(s): Shatzmiller, Maya.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Wage Labour in the Medieval Islamic West: Legal Issues in an Economic Context
Source: Journal of the Economic and Social History of the Orient , 40., 2 (May 1997):  Pages 174 - 206.
Year of Publication: 1997.

103. Record Number: 620
Author(s): Parker, Deborah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in the Book Trade in Italy, 1475- 1620
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 49, 3 (Autumn 1996): 509-511. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

104. Record Number: 1395
Author(s): Salet, Francis.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chronique. Orfèvrerie. Les anges d'Anne de Bretagne du trésor du Saint-Esprit [summary of an article by Danielle Gaborit-Chopin published in the Revue du Louvre (1994), pages 17-28].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 154., 2 (juin 1996):  Pages 178 - 179.
Year of Publication: 1996.

105. Record Number: 2773
Author(s): Rath, Brigitte.
Contributor(s):
Title : Im Reich der Topoi. Nonnenleben im mittelalterlichen Österreich zwischen Norm und Praxis
Source: Homme: Zeitschrift für feministische Geschichtswissenschaft , 7., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 122 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1996.

106. Record Number: 7447
Author(s): Piccinni, Gabriella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le Donne nella vita economica, sociale e politica dell'Italia medievale [The historiography of women and work in Italy now gives more attention to the Middle Ages and to regional studies which cast light on local differences. The documentation is incomplete, especially where a woman's work may be lumped together with her husband's or their kin. This is particularly true of artisan work in cities and towns. Women also were intensively involved in agriculture. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Il Lavoro delle donne.   Edited by Angela Groppi .   Storia delle donne in Italia. Editori Laterza, 1996. Homme: Zeitschrift für feministische Geschichtswissenschaft , 7., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 5 - 46.
Year of Publication: 1996.

107. Record Number: 7449
Author(s): Greci, Roberto.
Contributor(s):
Title : Donne e corporazioni: La Fluidità di un rapporto [Women played a subordinate role in the Italian urban economy, but they were involved in various trades. They were particularly active in making cloth. Guilds marginalized women, even when women were involved in making goods. Women also played a significant role as innkeepers and small-scale retailers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Il Lavoro delle donne.   Edited by Angela Groppi .   Storia delle donne in Italia. Editori Laterza, 1996. Homme: Zeitschrift für feministische Geschichtswissenschaft , 7., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 71 - 91.
Year of Publication: 1996.

108. Record Number: 7450
Author(s): Angiolini, Franco.
Contributor(s):
Title : Schiave [In the Middle Ages, slaves brought into Italy primarily came from the Black Sea region, and most were women. The sixteenth century saw an inversion of the gender ratio, as well as fresh supplies from Africa, the Balkans, and, for a time, Muslim Granada. There also was a shift from domestic to agricultural bondage. Slave women were exploited sexually, but some attained manumission through marriage. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Il Lavoro delle donne.   Edited by Angela Groppi .   Storia delle donne in Italia. Editori Laterza, 1996. Homme: Zeitschrift für feministische Geschichtswissenschaft , 7., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 92 - 115.
Year of Publication: 1996.

109. Record Number: 9505
Author(s): Dever, Vincent M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Aquinas on the Practice of Prostitution [The author argues that Aquinas's views on prostitution in the "Summa Theologiae" had an important impact. While acknowledging the sinfulness of the prostitute, Aquinas tolerated her activities and even recognized her monetary right for just payment. Aqui
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 13., ( 1996):  Pages 39 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1996.

110. Record Number: 542
Author(s): Gaunt, Simon.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Women of Papal Avignon. A New Source: The "Liber Divisionis" of 1371 [census of 3800 heads of households, 17% of which were females].
Source: Journal of Women's History , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 36 - 59.
Year of Publication: 1996.

111. Record Number: 911
Author(s): Howell, Martha C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fixing Movables: Gifts by Testament in Late Medieval Douai [The personal goods that women bequeathed to family, friends, and the poor carried social meaning and economic value].
Source: Past and Present (Full Text via JSTOR) 150 (Feb. 1996): 3-45. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

112. Record Number: 657
Author(s): Falskau, Christian-Frederik.
Contributor(s):
Title : Demographic Decline in Late Medieval England: Some Thoughts on Recent Research [questions the theory that women's employment, especially as servants, drove down population after the Black Death].
Source: Economic History Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 49, 1 (Feb. 1996): 1-19. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

113. Record Number: 2279
Author(s): McClanan, A. L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Byzantine Steelyard Weights Depicting Empresses
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 36
Year of Publication: 1996.

114. Record Number: 842
Author(s): Richardson, Malcolm.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Commerce, and Writing in Late Medieval England [family and business letters sent by women ].
Source: Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 1., ( 1996):  Pages 123 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1996.

115. Record Number: 1434
Author(s): Vesce, Thomas E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Light Leaps in "Ancrene Wisse" VI: "Wid Lihtleapes Buggen Eche Blisse"? [the anchoress is enjoined to avoid the leap into lechery and pride, like the leaps of Eve and Lucifer, but instead imitate the leaps of Christ].
Source: Mediaevalia , 19., ( 1996):  Pages 385 - 403. (1996 (for 1993)) Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1996.

116. Record Number: 1669
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Old French "Lai" and Romance [Southeastern Medieval Association. Charleston, South Carolina, October 5-7, 1995].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 11
Year of Publication: 1996.

117. Record Number: 13837
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Models, Two Standards: Moral Teaching and Sexual Mores [The author examines lay beliefs about sexual behavior in contrast to Church teaching. As evidence Karras analyzes the devotional text, "Dives and Pauper," and ecclesiastical court records. She finds instances of a double standard with women expected to be chaste while men had sex outside of marriage with the fault frequently lodged against the women who had "tempted" the men into sin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Bodies and Disciplines: Intersections of Literature and History in Fifteenth-Century England.   Edited by Barbara A. Hanawalt and David Wallace .   Medieval Cultures series, 9. University of Minnesota Press, 1996. Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 123 - 138.
Year of Publication: 1996.

118. Record Number: 837
Author(s): Appleby, David F.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Progress in Carolingian Saxony: A Case from Ninth- Century Corvey [the text recording the transferral of Saint Pusinna's relics to Herford in Saxony praises the Saxons before and after their conversion].
Source: Catholic Historical Review , 82., 4 (Oct. 1996):  Pages 599 - 613.
Year of Publication: 1996.

119. Record Number: 742
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reproduction and Production in Early Ireland [roles of women, especially as makers of babies and makers of cloth].
Source: Portraits of Medieval and Renaissance Living: Essays in Honor of David Herlihy.   Edited by Samual K. Cohn, Jr. and Steven A. Epstein .   University of Michigan Press, 1996. Catholic Historical Review , 82., 4 (Oct. 1996):  Pages 71 - 89.
Year of Publication: 1996.

120. Record Number: 1827
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Peintunge and "Schadewe" in "Ancrene Wisse" Part 4 [argues that the source for "Schadewe" (Shadow) and "Peintunge" (Image) comes, not from Hugh of St. Victor and ultimately Plato's theory of ideas, but from Alain de Lille's "Summa de arte praedicatoria" in which he describes three kinds of fire].
Source: Notes and Queries , 4 (December 1996):  Pages 399 - 403.
Year of Publication: 1996.

121. Record Number: 1
Author(s): Hanawalt, Barbara A.
Contributor(s):
Title : At the Margin of Women's Space in Medieval Europe [regulation of women's space with an emphasis on prostitutes and religious women].
Source: Matrons and Marginal Women in Medieval Society.   Edited by Robert R. Edwards and Vickie Ziegler .   Boydell Press, 1995. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 25., 1 (Winter 1995):  Pages 1 - 17. Also reprinted in "Of Good and Ill Repute": Gender and Social Control in Medieval England. Barbara A. Hanawalt. Oxford University Press, 1998. Pages 70-87.
Year of Publication: 1995.

122. Record Number: 2
Author(s): Kettle, Ann J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ruined Maids: Prostitutes and Servant Girls in Later Medieval England
Source: Matrons and Marginal Women in Medieval Society.   Edited by Robert R. Edwards and Vickie Ziegler .   Boydell Press, 1995. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 25., 1 (Winter 1995):  Pages 19 - 31.
Year of Publication: 1995.

123. Record Number: 259
Author(s): Dusel, Juliana, Sister
Contributor(s):
Title : Bride of Christ: Image in the the "Ancren Riwle"
Source: Sovereign Lady: Essays on Women in Middle English Literature.   Edited by Muriel Whitaker .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 25., 1 (Winter 1995):  Pages 115 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1995.

124. Record Number: 1987
Author(s): Mango, Marlia Mundell.
Contributor(s):
Title : Artemis at Daphne [mythological hunting motifs on brass buckets and a mosaic pavement at Daphne near Antioch are analyzed].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 263 Issue title: Bosphorus: Essays in the Honour of Cyril Mango. Ed. by Stephanos Efthymiadis, Claudia Rapp, and Dimitris Tsougarakis.
Year of Publication: 1995.

125. Record Number: 3731
Author(s): Herlihy, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Work in the Towns of Traditional Europe [The author argues that women lost status in the urban economies between the thirteenth and fifteenth centuries; he suggests four factors that drove this change: urbanization, capitalization, saturated markets, and monopolization].
Source: Women, Family, and Society in Medieval Europe: Historical Essays, 1978-1991.   Edited by David Herlihy .   Berghahn Books, 1995. Byzantinische Forschungen , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 69 - 95. The article was originally published in La donna nell' economia. Secc. XIII-XVIII. Atti della "Ventunesima Settimana di Studix" 10-15 aprile 1989, a cura di Simonetta Cavaciocchi. Le Monnier,1990. 103-130.
Year of Publication: 1995.

126. Record Number: 1008
Author(s): Batlle, Carme and Teresa Vinyoles
Contributor(s):
Title : La Culture des femmes en Catalogne au Moyen Age Tardif [survey of opportunities for education, apprenticeship, reading, and learning oral traditions for women from the nobility and from merchant families].
Source: La Femme dans l' histoire et la société méridionales (IXe-XIXe S.): Actes du 66e congrés. .   Fédération historique du Languedoc méditerranéen et du Roussillon, 1995. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 129 - 150.
Year of Publication: 1995.

127. Record Number: 324
Author(s): Nicholas, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Child and Adolescent Labour in the Late Medieval City: A Flemish Model in Regional Perspective
Source: English Historical Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 110 (Nov. 1995): 1103-1131. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

128. Record Number: 394
Author(s): Zimmermann, Margarete.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sharpen Your Mind with the Whetstone of Books: The Female Recluse as Reader in Goscelin's "Liber Confortatorius," Aelred of Rievaulx's "De Institutione Inclusarum," and the "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995.  Pages 113 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1995.

129. Record Number: 31
Author(s): Stuard, Susan Mosher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancillary Evidence for the Decline of Medieval Slavery [Experience of women slaves in the countryside and in wealthy households counters the standard argument made about slavery. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Past and Present , 149 ( 1995):  Pages 3 - 28. Republished in Considering Medieval Women and Gender. Susan Mosher Stuard. Ashgate Variorum, 2010. Chapter VII.
Year of Publication: 1995.

130. Record Number: 396
Author(s): Bell, David N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the "Wohunge of Ure Lauerd": The Thirteenth- Century Female Reader and the Lover- Knight
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Past and Present , 149 ( 1995):  Pages 137 - 147.
Year of Publication: 1995.

131. Record Number: 617
Author(s): Biscoglio, Frances M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fragmentation and Reconstruction: Images of the Female Body in "Ancrene Wisse" and the Katherine Group [images of the erotic, the maternal, the ascetic, and of fertility represent the union of the anchoress with Christ].
Source: Comitatus , 26., ( 1995):  Pages 27 - 52. [Contributions are accepted from graduate students and those who have received their doctorates within the last three years]
Year of Publication: 1995.

132. Record Number: 1192
Author(s): Feimer, Joel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexual Violence and the Female Reader: Symbolic "Rape" in the Saints' Lives of the Katherine Group [the martyred virgins Juliana, Margaret, and Katherine].
Source: Women's Studies , 24., 3 ( 1995):  Pages 205 - 217. Special Issue: Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Scholarship
Year of Publication: 1995.

133. Record Number: 2449
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Liber miraculorum" of Unterlinden: An Icon in Its Convent Setting [importance of images in nuns' and lay peoples' devotional practices based on a manuscript that records the miracles worked by an icon of Mary ; role played by spiritual advisers as the givers of images].
Source: The Sacred Image East and West.   Edited by Robert Ousterhout and Leslie Brubaker .   Illinois Byzantine Studies IV. University of Illinois Press, 1995. Women's Studies , 24., 3 ( 1995):  Pages 147 - 190. Reprinted in The Visual and the Visionary: Art and Female Spirituality in Late Medieval Germany. By Jeffrey F. Hamburger. Zone Books, 1998. Pages 279-315.
Year of Publication: 1995.

134. Record Number: 367
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman, Authority, and the Book in the Middle Ages [a female author's response to Richard de Fournival's "Bestiaire d' Amour"].
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Women's Studies , 24., 3 ( 1995):  Pages 61 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1995.

135. Record Number: 6627
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Catherine of Siena in Late Medieval Britain: Feminizing Literary Reception Through Gender and Class [The author argues that the life and writings of St. Catherine had a great influence in England for 160 years following her death; she was valued for her role as a bridge between Christ and humanity, female and male, the lower social classes and the highe
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 163 - 203. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

136. Record Number: 1684
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Theophano Leave her Mark on the Ottonian Sumptuary Arts?
Source: The Empress Theophano: Byzantium and the West at the Turn of the First Millennium.   Edited by Adelbert Davids .   Cambridge University Press, 1995. Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 169 - 193. This text appeared in German in Kaiserin Theophanu: Prinzessin aus der Fremde- des Westreichs Grosse Kaiserin. Edited by G. Wolf. Bohlau, 1991. Pages 263-278.
Year of Publication: 1995.

137. Record Number: 357
Author(s): Hayes, Stephen E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Of Three Workings in Man's Soul: A Middle English Prose Meditation on the Annunciation
Source: Vox Mystica: Essays on Medieval Mysticism in Honor of Professor Valerie M Lagorio.   Edited by Anne Clark Bartlett, Thomas H. Bestul, Janet Goebel, and William F. Pollard .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 177 - 199.
Year of Publication: 1995.

138. Record Number: 573
Author(s): Bennett, Judith M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Men in the Brewers' Gild of London, CA 1420 [unlike other guilds, the brewers admitted women in large numbers, but they were excluded from certain guild functions].
Source: The Salt of Common Life: Individuality and Choice in the Medieval Town, Countryside, and Church: Essays Presented to J. Ambrose Raftis.   Edited by Edwin Brezette DeWindt Studies in Medieval Culture, 36.   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1995. Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 181 - 232.
Year of Publication: 1995.

139. Record Number: 677
Author(s): Laing, Margaret and Angus McIntosh
Contributor(s):
Title : The Language of "Ancrene Riwle," the Katherine Group Texts and "The Wohunge of Ure Lauerd" in BL Cotton Titus D XVIII [detailed analysis of language overlays including a North West Midland element and a North Midland element].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 235 - 263.
Year of Publication: 1995.

140. Record Number: 232
Author(s): Wiesner-Hanks, Merry.
Contributor(s):
Title : Learned Task and Given to Men Alone: The Gendering of Tasks in Early Modern German Cities [division between production and reproduction].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 25., 1 (Winter 1995):  Pages 89 - 106.
Year of Publication: 1995.

141. Record Number: 2780
Author(s): Hirschmann, Frank G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Wo die Nonnen plieben, welche von Steinfeld ausgewichen sein. Auf den Spuren der Frauen vor dem Hintergrund der religiösen Bewegung des 12. Jahrhunderts
Source: Jahrbuch für westdeutsche Landesgeschichte , 20., ( 1994):  Pages 37 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1994.

142. Record Number: 4742
Author(s): Mango, Cyril.
Contributor(s):
Title : Notes d'épigraphie et d'archéologie Constantinople, Nicée. l. Deux découvertes du Dr. Dethier. 1. Épitaphe d'une prétendue petite-fille de Justin II [in the 1860s the archaeologist Dethier made notes about an inscription, now lost , that he took to be the epitaph of a granddaughter of Justin II; the author argues that it is in fact for the nurse of Justin's daughter].
Source: Travaux et Mémoires (Centre de Recherche d'histoire et civilisation de Byzance) , 12., ( 1994):  Pages 344 - 345.
Year of Publication: 1994.

143. Record Number: 6269
Author(s): Carugati, Giuliana.
Contributor(s):
Title : Retorica amorosa e verità in Dante: il "De Causis" e l'idea della donna nel "Convivio" [Dante's loves, especially Beatrice, have been interpreted as representing philosophy; use of female abstractions is clearest in the "Convivio," which was influenced by the Pseudo-Aristotelian "Liber de Causis" with its Neoplatonic themes; the superior intelligences mentioned in the book were feminine, as was the world soul, giving Dante a philosophical context for his feelings of love; despite these feminine abstractions, actual women were conceded no such dignity].
Source: Dante Studies , 12., ( 1994):  Pages 161 - 175.
Year of Publication: 1994.

144. Record Number: 8540
Author(s): Jornet, Núria.
Contributor(s):
Title : La femme agressée et agresseur. Une analyse des procès criminels civils catalans du XIVe siècle
Source: La Femme pendant le Moyen Âge et l'époque moderne. Actes des Sixiémes Journées Anthropologiques de Valbonne 9-10-11 juin 1992.   Edited by Luc Buchet Dossier de Documentation Archéologique, 17.   CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques) Éditions, 1994. Dante Studies , 12., ( 1994):  Pages 221 - 229.
Year of Publication: 1994.

145. Record Number: 4190
Author(s): Thompson, Anne B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Shaping a Saint's Life: Frideswide of Oxford [The author argues that the Middle English "Life" emphasizes Frideswide's agency and subjectivity; also the Latin and Middle English texts differ in their narrative approaches and treatment of space and time].
Source: Medium Aevum , 63., 1 ( 1994):  Pages 34 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1994.

146. Record Number: 24350
Author(s): Laughton, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Court: Some Evidence from Fifteenth-Century Chester [The author analyzes records from two Chester courts, the Portmote headed by the mayor and the Pentice presided over by the two city sheriffs. Analysis of Pentice rolls for 1431-32, 1459-60, and 1489-90 show women involved in 21% of cases. For both courts, women appear in a variety of roles including plaintiffs, pledges, traders and producers (many of them legally independent as "femmes soles"), debtors, thieves, and brawlers. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Harlaxton Medieval Studies , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 89 - 99. Issue title: England in the Fifteenth Century: Proceedings of the 1992 Harlaxton Symposium
Year of Publication: 1994.

147. Record Number: 1875
Author(s): Solterer, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing, Hearing, Tasting Women: Medieval Senses of Reading [comparison of the woman reader's five senses in the "Bestiaire d'Amour" and the response by an anonymous woman author].
Source: Comparative Literature (Full Text via JSTOR) 46, 2 (Spring 1994): 129-145. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

148. Record Number: 1438
Author(s): Best, Myra.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lady and the King: "Ancrene Wisse's" Parable of the Royal Wooing Re-Examined
Source: English Studies , 75., 6 (November 1994):  Pages 509 - 522.
Year of Publication: 1994.

149. Record Number: 8478
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaste Bodies: Frames and Experiences [The author explores the "Ancrene Wisse," arguing that it embodies an ideology of containment for women in its emphasis on the enclosed, chaste body. At the same time there are slips since the manuscript shows glimpses of a textual community and even of anchoresses living together. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. English Studies , 75., 6 (November 1994):  Pages 24 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1994.

150. Record Number: 1818
Author(s): Matthews, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading the Woman Reading : Culture and Commodity in Chrétien's "Pesme Aventure" Episode [argues that the episode disguises the commodification of the daughter at "Pesme Aventure" by the very romance conventions that she highlights in her reading ; the author also argues against a "realistic" reading of the silkworkers' situation].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 30., 2 ( 1994):  Pages 113 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1994.

151. Record Number: 5263
Author(s): Beckwith, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Passionate Regulation: Enclosure, Ascesis, and the Feminist Imaginary [The author examines the ways in which the body of the anchoress in the "Ancrene Wisse" is controlled through practices including confession, asceticism, regulation of the senses, and physical enactments of "imitatio Christi"].
Source: South Atlantic Quarterly , 93., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 803 - 824.
Year of Publication: 1994.

152. Record Number: 1978
Author(s): Goldberg, Jeremy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Later Medieval English Archives [overview of the various kinds of original records available for the study of women in the subject areas of work, law, lifecycle, and religious devotion].
Source: Journal of the Society of Archivists , 15., 1 (Spring 1994):  Pages 59 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1994.

153. Record Number: 14350
Author(s): Fletcher, Alan J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Dancing Virgins of "Hali Meiðdhad" [The author points out a passage in "Hali Meidenhad" in which the virgins in Heaven are described as dancing and singing. Fletcher suggests that they would have been performing a "carole en ronde" as in the "Roman de la Rose." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Notes and Queries , 238., (December 1993):  Pages 437 - 439.
Year of Publication: 1993.

154. Record Number: 14767
Author(s): Baker, Denise N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Julian of Norwich and the Anchoritic Literature [The author examines the possiblity that Julian of Norwich might have been influenced by "De inclusarum institutione," the "Ancrene Wisse," Rolle's "Form of Living," and Hilton's "Scale of Perfection." The evidence is not conclusive in any of the cases. However, it is clear that Julian was familiar with the tenets of medieval spirituality as reflected in devotional and anchoritic texts of the time. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 19., 4 (December 1993):  Pages 148 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1993.

155. Record Number: 8576
Author(s): Tallan, Cheryl.
Contributor(s):
Title : Opportunities for Medieval Northern European Jewish Widows in the Public and Domestic Spheres [The author suggests that some Jewish widows became prominent in the public domain, but only insofar as they took over the duties of their late husbands. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Upon My Husband's Death: Widows in the Literature and Histories of Medieval Europe.   Edited by Louise Mirrer Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization .   University of Michigan Press, 1992. Medium Aevum , 61., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 115 - 127.
Year of Publication: 1992.

156. Record Number: 8687
Author(s): Graham, Helena.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman's Work ...: Labour and Gender in the Late Medieval Countryside [Closely studying court rolls, the author investigates what kinds of labor women performed and were associated with in medieval Staffordshire. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman is a Worthy Wight: Women in English Society c. 1200-1500.   Edited by P.J.P. Goldberg .   Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992. Medium Aevum , 61., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 126 - 148.
Year of Publication: 1992.

157. Record Number: 8684
Author(s): Smith, Richard M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Geographical Diversity in the Resort to Marriage in Late Medieval Europe: Work, Reputation, and Unmarried Females in the Household Formation Systems of Northern and Southern Europe [The author uses demographic evidence from York and Tuscany to demonstrate the differences in household systems between Northwest and Mediterranean Europe. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman is a Worthy Wight: Women in English Society c. 1200-1500.   Edited by P.J.P. Goldberg .   Alan Sutton Publishing, 1992. Mystics Quarterly , 19., 4 (December 1993):  Pages 16 - 59.
Year of Publication: 1992.

158. Record Number: 9458
Author(s): Bartlett, Anne Clark.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Delicious Matyr”: Feminine Courtesy in Middle English Devotional Literature for Women [The author explores how devotional texts addressed to women readers often used the discourses of courtly literature and romances, while at the same time critiquing these literary conventions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 9 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1992.

159. Record Number: 9534
Author(s): Laiou, Angeliki E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Festival of "Agathe": Comments on the Life of Constantinopolitan Women [The author examines a short treatise by Michael Psellos about the annual festival of Agathe in which women sang and danced near a church. Laiou argues that the women's activities which praised good cloth-making suggest that they were members of a female guild for carders, spinners, and weavers. The article was originally published in Byzantium 1 (1986): 111-122. Volume One was also titled Tribute to Andreas N. Stratos. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gender, Society, and Economic Life in Byzantium. Angeliki E. Laiou Variorum Collected Studies Series .   Ashgate, 1992. Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 111 - 122. Originally published in Byzantium 1 (1986): 111-122. Volume One was also titled Tribute to Andreas N. Stratos.
Year of Publication: 1992.

160. Record Number: 10527
Author(s): Opitz, Claudia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Life in the Late Middle Ages [The late-medieval era was a period of enormous change for women in work, family, life, and religion. Although women had an inferior legal status (laws limited their rights within the family and public sphere), some freedom did exist for women within marriage. Aristocratic women could be very influential because of their economic standing, middle class women could control household budgets, and rural women and wives of urban craftsmen sometimes had their status as laborers recognized. The author provides an overview of motherhood, fertility, contraception, women’s work (in rural and urban environments), and women’s participation in the fields of education, healing, health care, and crafts. Single women and widows could exert some power in their marginal positions. The author views convents as empowering institutions for women, although some people had anxieties about the status of women mystics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 267 - 317.
Year of Publication: 1992.

161. Record Number: 10677
Author(s): Olsen, Ulla Sander.
Contributor(s):
Title : Work and Work Ethics in the Nunnery of Syon Abbey in the Fifteenth Century [The author examines the Brigittine Rule and additional legislation for the nuns of Syon for sections dealing with manual labor. Saint Bridget originally declared that all sisters must work and there would be no "conversae" or servant sisters. However, the first nun at Syon refused to honor this provision. At the dissolution of Syon there were four lay sisters to do the heavy work. The nuns spent their work time doing embroidery and copying manuscripts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Mystical Tradition in England: Exeter Symposium , 5., ( 1992):  Pages 129 - 143.
Year of Publication: 1992.

162. Record Number: 10528
Author(s): Piponnier, Francoise.
Contributor(s):
Title : The World of Women [Living quarters and work areas (and artistic representations of domestic activity) reveal much about the everyday life and work of medieval women. Rural women were involved in agricultural tasks like tending grapevines and animals, artisan wives and widows participated in selling crafts, and textile production was largely done by urban women (as were the professional activities of sewing and spinning). Evidence from medieval dwellings gives insight into women’s duties in the domestic sphere, including raising children, preparing meals, and even managing the household. Although they did dominate certain fields such as textile production, women at all levels of society enjoyed less freedom of movement and action than men. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Mystics Quarterly , 19., 4 (December 1993):  Pages 323 - 335.
Year of Publication: 1992.

163. Record Number: 6681
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Un Salario o l'onore: come valutare le donne Fiorentine del XIV- XV secolo [in Renaissance Italy, a married woman's honor was incompatible with such public functions as gainful employment; an unmarried woman or a widow was more likely to seek employment, although a married woman might make thread or cloth at home; the married woman's economic identity was supposed to be submerged in that of her husband].
Source: Quaderni Storici , 1 (aprile 1992):  Pages 41 - 49.
Year of Publication: 1992.

164. Record Number: 10015
Author(s): Rumsey, Lucinda.
Contributor(s):
Title : The scorpion of lechery and Ancrene Wisse [The author explores the symbolic use of the scorpion in the Ancrene Wisse. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medium Aevum , 61., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 48 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1992.

165. Record Number: 10759
Author(s): Carruthers, Leo.
Contributor(s):
Title : No womman of no clerk is preysed: Attitudes to Women in Medieval English Religious Literature [The author briefly surveys Middle English sermon collections and penitential manuals. Title note supplied be Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Medium Aevum , 61., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 49 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1992.

166. Record Number: 10017
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : The origins of Ancrene Wisse: new answers, new questions [The author reconsiders the West Midlands and Augustinian origins of the Ancrene Wisse. The Appendix presents the Lay Brothers‚ Hours from the Dominican constitutions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medium Aevum , 61., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 206 - 228.
Year of Publication: 1992.

167. Record Number: 11041
Author(s): Beer, Jeanette Mary Ayres.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fourteenth-century 'Bestiaire d'amour' [The author studies MS. New York Pierpont Morgan Library 459, and shows it to be an unconventional derivative of the earlier "Bestiaire d'amour," produced by a scribe who seems to have had little knowledge of its original author. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinardus: Yearbook of the International Reynard Society , 4., ( 1991):  Pages 19 - 26.
Year of Publication: 1991.

168. Record Number: 11222
Author(s): Saller, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : European Family History and Roman Law
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 335 - 346.
Year of Publication: 1991.

169. Record Number: 11671
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexual Discourse through the Image of the Unicorn in Richard de Fournival's "Bestiaire d' amour" and "Response" [The author contrasts Richard de Fournival's use of the unicorn with that of the woman who wrote the "Response." For Richard the unicorn symbolizes men who are victims of unloving women, while the woman sees the unicorn as the man who deceives with "soft words." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romance Languages Annual , 3., ( 1991):  Pages 108 - 110.
Year of Publication: 1991.

170. Record Number: 11226
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Parallels in the Education of Medieval Jewish Women and Christian Women [An abstract precedes this essay in the journal.]
Source: Jewish History , 5., 1 (Spring 1991):  Pages 41 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1991.

171. Record Number: 11228
Author(s): Tallan, Cheryl.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Jewish Widows: Their Control of Resources
Source: Jewish History , 5., 1 (Spring 1991):  Pages 63 - 74.
Year of Publication: 1991.

172. Record Number: 8657
Author(s): Russell, D. W.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Secularization of Hagiography in the Anglo-Norman "Vie Seinte Osith" [The Anglo-Norman hagiographical poem borrows heavily from Old French secular genres, including "chansons de geste" and romances. The poem departs from most narratives about holy women by using courtly discourse to describe the exemplary virginity, marriage, and trials of Saint Osith. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Allegorica , 12., ( 1991):  Pages 3 - 16.
Year of Publication: 1991.

173. Record Number: 12750
Author(s): LoPrete, Kimberly A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anglo-Norman Card of Adela of Blois [Adela occupied a high social status and power by virtue of her royal blood (she was the daughter of William the Conqueror), her role as the Countess of Blois, Chartres, and Meaux, and her position as the mother of Stephen, future King of England. She exerted authority as family head, accumulating land holdings and inheritance claims for the family by negotiating marriage alliances between her own family (the Thebaudians) and other powerful dynasties. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Albion , 22., 4 (Winter 1990):  Pages 567 - 589.
Year of Publication: 1990.

174. Record Number: 12865
Author(s): Furrow, Melissa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Man of Law's St. Custance: Sex and the Saeculum [The author argues that the Man of Law's Tale must be read against the backdrop of other lives of holy women in order to show how Chaucer uses familiar material. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 24., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 223 - 235.
Year of Publication: 1990.

175. Record Number: 12698
Author(s): Turner, Ralph V.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Children of Anglo-Norman Royalty and Their Upbringing [Although royals did demonstrate affection toward their children (both legitimate and illegitimate), aristocratic parents did not consider childcare their primary responsibility. Although noblewomen participated in the education of children, they saw other roles as more important: supervising household affairs, acting as regents when their husbands were away, giving birth to heirs, and negotiating marriage alliances for their sons and daughters. Many other people (including household servants, nurses, and relatives) shared the responsibility of childrearing. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 11., 2 (Autumn 1990):  Pages 17 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1990.

176. Record Number: 15604
Author(s): Loengard, Janet Senderowitz.
Contributor(s):
Title : Legal History and the Medieval Englishwoman Revisited [The author surveys recent scholarship on English law and medieval women. She analyzes important articles, signals noteworthy trends, and suggests areas which need more research. Loengard notes in particular the contributions made by social and economic historians beyond the publishing venues of legal history. Part of this essay was earlier published as "Legal History and the Medieval Englishwoman: A Fragmented View" in "Law and History Review" 4 (1986): 161-178. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History.   Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal .   University of Georgia Press, 1990. Medieval Prosopography , 11., 2 (Autumn 1990):  Pages 210 - 236.
Year of Publication: 1990.

177. Record Number: 12765
Author(s): Vikan, Gary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Art and Marriage in Early Byzantium [The author surveys the material culture of “marriage art” which survives from Byzantium, paying special attention to wedding rings and other jewelry, coins, and marriage belts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers , 44., ( 1990):  Pages 145 - 163.
Year of Publication: 1990.

178. Record Number: 12805
Author(s): Diekstra, F.N.M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Fifteenth-Century Borrowings from the "Ancrene Wisse" [The article traces out the borrowings from Ancrene Wisse in two unedited fifteenth-century manuscripts, British Library Harley 6571 and British Library Additional 30944, and presents edited versions of the various parallel passages. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Studies , 71., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 81 - 104.
Year of Publication: 1990.

179. Record Number: 11192
Author(s): Harris, Barbara J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Property, Power, and Personal Relations: Elite Mothers and Sons in Yorkist and Early Tudor England [Women were often marginalized by patriarchal power structures that placed the father at the head of the family, but the birth of a son often elevated the wife’s position. Since the first son was greatly valued in a system of primogenitural inheritance, noble mothers often had close emotional ties to their sons. The political and social future of the family often rested on the mother’s ability to manage the household, display the family’s wealth and status, and negotiate marriages and other alliances for the family’s children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 15, 3 (Spring 1990): 606-632. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

180. Record Number: 12767
Author(s): Millet, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Audience of the Saints’ Lives of the Katherine Group [The author posits that the Katherine Group had two “concentric” audiences, one composed of anchoresses, and the other, a general audience, directly addressed by the text, who may have received the Lives orally, in church. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reading Medieval Studies , 16., ( 1990):  Pages 127 - 156.
Year of Publication: 1990.

181. Record Number: 12806
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Some editorial problems in the Katherine Group [The author discusses the textual problems, caused by both scribes and editors, to the Katherine Group. The article includes an appendix that gives statistics on alliterative and rhythmical phrases in Seinte Iuliene, Seinte Katerine and Seinte Margarete, as compared with a sample from Aelfric's Passio sanctae Ceciliae. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Studies , 71., 5 ( 1990):  Pages 386 - 394.
Year of Publication: 1990.

182. Record Number: 5028
Author(s): Sághy, Marianne.
Contributor(s):
Title : History of the Research Project: "Women and Power in Medieval East Central Europe"
Source: East Central Europe , 1 ( 1974):  Pages 219 - 225. Women and Power in East Central Europe - Medieval and Modern. Edited by Marianne Sághy.
Year of Publication: 1974.

183. Record Number: 28743
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : June
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Limbourg_brothers_-_Les_tr%C3%A8s_riches_heures_du_Duc_de_Berry_-_Juin_%28June%29_-_WGA13023.jpg/250px-Limbourg_brothers_-_Les_tr%C3%A8s_riches_heures_du_Duc_de_Berry_-_Juin_%28June%29_-_WGA13023.jpg
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184. Record Number: 28762
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Sheep Pen
Source:
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185. Record Number: 28813
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Thamyris
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/De_mulieribus_claris_painter.jpg/250px-De_mulieribus_claris_painter.jpg
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186. Record Number: 28839
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : July
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/b/be/Les_Tr%C3%A8s_Riches_Heures_du_duc_de_Berry_juillet.jpg/250px-Les_Tr%C3%A8s_Riches_Heures_du_duc_de_Berry_juillet.jpg
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187. Record Number: 28843
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Scenes from Old and New Testaments
Source:
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188. Record Number: 28939
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Foire [Fair] Scene
Source:
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189. Record Number: 28953
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Goldsmith in his Shop, possibly St. Eligius
Source:
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190. Record Number: 28954
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Buonomini Visiting a Sick Woman
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/c/cc/Oratorio_dei_buonomini_di_san_martino%2C_bottega_di_Domenico_ghirlandaio%2C_lunetta_10.JPG/250px-Oratorio_dei_buonomini_di_san_martino%2C_bottega_di_Domenico_ghirlandaio%2C_lunetta_10.JPG
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191. Record Number: 28955
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Buonomini Taking Inventory
Source:
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192. Record Number:
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Title : September
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193. Record Number:
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Title : Dedication Stone of Ulm Cathedral
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/71/Ulm-Muenster-ReliefGrundsteinlegung-061209.jpg/250px-Ulm-Muenster-ReliefGrundsteinlegung-061209.jpg
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194. Record Number: 30939
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Expulsion from Eden; Eve Tilling the Earth
Source:
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195. Record Number: 30952
Author(s):
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Title : Women Spinning and Carding Wool
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196. Record Number:
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Title : Baking Brown Bread
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197. Record Number:
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Title : Dill
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198. Record Number:
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Title : Warm Water
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199. Record Number:
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Title : Autumn
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200. Record Number:
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Title : Beets
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201. Record Number:
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Title : Cabbage
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202. Record Number:
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Title : Squash
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203. Record Number:
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Title : Summer
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204. Record Number:
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Title : Lettuce
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205. Record Number:
Author(s):
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Title : Millet
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206. Record Number:
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Title : Turnips
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207. Record Number:
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Title : Olive Oil
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208. Record Number:
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Title : Pine Cones
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209. Record Number:
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Title : Savich or Barley Soup
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210. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Savich or Wheat Soup
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211. Record Number:
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Title : Asparagus
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212. Record Number:
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Title : Spelt
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213. Record Number:
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Title : Spinach
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214. Record Number:
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Title : Pasta
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215. Record Number:
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Title : Linen Clothing
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216. Record Number:
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Title : Theriac
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217. Record Number:
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Title : Vinegar
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218. Record Number: 30964
Author(s):
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Title : Calendar Page for August
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219. Record Number: 31221
Author(s):
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Title : Holy Family at Work: Opening Image for Saturday Hours of the Virgin, Sext
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220. Record Number: 31686
Author(s):
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Title : Nature Forging a Baby, from the Roman de la Rose
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221. Record Number: 32649
Author(s):
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Title : A Goldsmith in His Shop
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222. Record Number: 33958
Author(s):
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Title : Plaque with Adam and Eve at the Forge
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223. Record Number: 34807
Author(s):
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Title : Choosing a wet nurse
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