Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


33 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 16280
Author(s): Burns, E. Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saracen Silk and the Virgin's "Chemise": Cultural Crossings in Cloth [The article explores the meanings attached to a relic at Chartres, an undergartment belonging to the Virgin. Burns traces connections from the imagined Western linen "chemise" to Islamic silks and Byzantine cuts of clothing. She concludes by arguing that in this way Chartres became more "Saracen." Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 365 - 397.
Year of Publication: 2006.

2. Record Number: 13679
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Representation, Imitation, Rejection: Chiara of Montefalco (d. 1308) and the Passion of Christ [The author briefly explores the visual references, especially for the passion of Christ, that were commonly known. These references helped shape people's understanding of holy women. When Clare of Montefalco died her fellow nuns expected to find evidence of her devotion to Christ in her heart. When it was cut open they found a cross and instruments of the passion. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies on Medieval and Early Modern Women 4: Victims or Viragos?   Edited by Christine Meek and Catherine Lawless .   Four Courts Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 89 - 101.
Year of Publication: 2005.

3. Record Number: 20782
Author(s): Trout, Dennis
Contributor(s):
Title : Theodelinda's Rome: "Ampullae," "Pittacia," and the Image of the City [Describes the political significance of Theodelinda's patronage of a collection of oils from the Roman "martyria," its repercussions on her relationship with Pope Gregory the Great, and that of Lombardy with the papacy in Rome. Also investigates how the burial locations of saints defined the layout of medieval cities. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 50., ( 2005):  Pages 131 - 145.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 11754
Author(s): Blanton, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ely's St. Æthelthryth: The Shrine's Enclosure of the Female Body as Symbol for the Inviolability of Monastic Space [The author argues that the monks at Ely used hagiographies and historical accounts to present the saint and her monastery in as strong a position as possible. The monks identify with the holy female body, emphasizing that as Æthelthryth's body is intact so the lands and properties of the monastery must not be violently seized. After the Norman conquest, William sent Norman monks to Ely. They, however, also wanted to defend the house's privileges, and the writings took on a new image for the saint. She is a warrior woman (a virago or virile woman) who confronts those wrongly holding the monastery's properties. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 50., ( 2005):  Pages 47 - 73.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 14754
Author(s): Blanton, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : King Anna's Daughters: Genealogical Narrative and Cult Formation in the "Liber Eliensis" [The "Liber Eliensis" written by twelfth century monks at Ely, created Wihtburg as another sister for Aethelthryth to underline her sanctity and importance by emphasizing virginity, royalty and holy kinship. These stories went beyond the monastery to local communities in East Anglia and appear in saints' lives and parish records as late as the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 127 - 149.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 13673
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn
Contributor(s):
Title : Dead to the World? Death and the Maiden Revisited in Medieval Women's Convent Culture [This essay looks at letters and biographies in the convents of Heloise and her English and French colleagues against the social and cultural history of medieval death. Rejecting stereotypes of nuns as immured from the world in the gothic embrace of a grave, the essay explores a living culture of death in which women interceded on behalf of themselves and others, organized their cultural traditions, shaped institutional memory, and dealt with the administrative, practical, and symbolic aspects of nunnery cemeteries. Equipping women for the work of commemoration and communion with the dead was to equip them with the means of self-conscious shaping of their own and others’ lives and spiritualities. Abstract submitted to Feminae by the author.]
Source: Guidance for Women in Twelfth-Century Convents.   Edited by Translated by Vera Morton with an interpretive essay by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Library of Medieval Women .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 157 - 180.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 11828
Author(s): Rawcliffe, Carole
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Childbirth, and Religion in Later Medieval England [The author traces the means by which the church offered support and aid to women facing childbirth. Rawcliffe also accounts for varied responses provided by popular religion including saints, shrines, and charms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 91 - 117.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 6615
Author(s): Park, Katharine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Relics of a Fertile Heart: The "Autopsy" of Clare of Montefalco [the author explores the meaning of the objects found inside Clare of Montefalco's body while it was being prepared for burial; these items were in the shape of religious objects (for example, a crucifix in her heart) or had religious significance (three stones for the Trinity in her gallbladder); the author explores contemporary medical and legal practices to provide a context, in particular autopsy, theories of generation, and caesarean operations].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 115 - 133.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 10457
Author(s): Blanton-Whetsell, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tota integra, tota incorrupta: The Shrine of St. Aethelthryth as Symbol of Monastic Autonomy [The author examines the "Liber Eliensis," a Latin compilation of charters, deeds, and other documents chronicling the history of Saint Etheldreda, her shrine, and the male monastery on the island of Ely. Norman monks were introduced to Ely by William the Conqueror, but they identified with their protective saint against both royal and episcopal interests. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 32, 2 (Spring 2002): 227-267. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 8424
Author(s): Español, Francesca.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sepulchre of Saint Juliana in the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar [The author argues that the reliefs of St. Juliana, the Virgin and Child, Christ in Majesty, and apostles all originally decorated a monumental sepulchre of the martyr Saint Juliana in the latter half of the twelfth century. In the fifteenth century Bishop Alonso de Cartagena translated her relics to an altar and remodelled the now-empty tomb to take up less space. Perhaps local devotion required the continued presence of the tomb. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Decorations for the holy dead: visual embellishments on tombs and shrines of saints.   Edited by Stephen Lamia and Elizabeth Valdez del Álamo International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 2002.  Pages 191 - 218.
Year of Publication: 2002.

11. Record Number: 4769
Author(s): Carr, Annemarie Weyl.
Contributor(s):
Title : Threads of Authority: The Virgin's Veil in the Middle Ages [because Mary was believed to have been assumed into Heaven, there were only secondary relics of her; mostly these were items of clothing; beginning in Constantinople, these relics were associated with the protection of cities and rulers; similar uses of Marian relics and images for the protection of rulers can be found in the West at least as early as the time of Charlemagne].
Source: Robes and Honor: The Medieval World of Investiture.   Edited by Stewart Gordon .   Palgrave, 2001.  Pages 59 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 6740
Author(s): Warren, Ann K
Contributor(s):
Title : The Head of St. Euphemia: Templar Devotion to Female Saints
Source: Gendering the Crusades.   Edited by Susan B. Edgington and Sarah Lambert .   University of Wales Press, 2001.  Pages 108 - 120.
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 5498
Author(s): Bodarwé, Katrinette.
Contributor(s):
Title : Roman Martyrs and Their Veneration in Ottonian Saxony: The Case of the "sanctimoniales" of Essen
Source: Early Medieval Europe , 9., 3 ( 2000):  Pages 345 - 365.
Year of Publication: 2000.

14. Record Number: 4634
Author(s): Webb, Diana.
Contributor(s):
Title : Raimondo and the Magdalen: A Twelfth-century Italian Pilgrim in Provence
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 26., 1 (March 2000):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2000.

15. Record Number: 5468
Author(s): Mayeski, Marie Anne and Jane Crawford
Contributor(s):
Title : Reclaiming an Ancient Story: Baudonivia's "Life of St. Radegunde" (circa 525- 587) [The author argues that while Radegunde founded a monastery in Poitiers where women were safe and where learning was encouraged, she did not give up her obligations as queen for a public and active role in the wellbeing of her people; an English translation of Baudonivia's "Life of Radegunde" by Jane Crawford follows on pages 89- 106].
Source: Women Saints in World Religions.   Edited by Arvind Sharma .   State University of New York Press, 2000.  Pages 71 - 88.
Year of Publication: 2000.

16. Record Number: 3920
Author(s): Hayward, Paul Anthony.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Miracula Inventionis Beate Mylburge Virginis" Attributed to "the Lord Ato, Cardinal Bishop of Ostia" [the article ends with an edition of the Latin text of the "Miracula"].
Source: English Historical Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 114, 457 (June 1999): 543-573. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

17. Record Number: 13758
Author(s): Schulenburg, Jane Tibbetts.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender, Celibacy, and Proscriptions of Sacred Space: Symbol and Practice [In the early and high Middle Ages women were regularly excluded from men's monasteries and from their churches, which held the relics and tombs of many saints. In some cases, monks made accommodations with separate oratories for women or special exceptions for queens and other highly-placed figures. Nevertheless, there are recorded incidents of women who ignored the monastic rules and entered areas forbidden to all females. Schulenburg suggests that in some cases, at least, women considered the rules only man-made and sought equal access to the tombs and relics of the saints. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Purity and Piety: Essays on Medieval Clerical Celibacy and Religious Reform.   Edited by Michael Frassetto Garland Medieval Casebooks Series .   Garland Publishing, 1998.  Pages 353 - 376.
Year of Publication: 1998.

18. Record Number: 2907
Author(s): Otter, Monika.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Temptation of St. AEthelthryth
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 9., 1 (Spring 1997):  Pages 139 - 163.
Year of Publication: 1997.

19. Record Number: 4348
Author(s): Holladay, Joan A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Relics, Reliquaries, and Religious Women: Visualizing the Holy Virgins of Cologne [the author points to the growth in the cult of Ursula and her virgins including the excavations of their supposed bodies, renovation of the church dedicated to the martyrs, and the invention of Ursula busts; the author suggests that the cult and the busts were designed to appeal to the daughters of patricians and burghers by showing that a holy life could be found in their social class and in marriage rather than in the extremes of the Beguines].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 18., ( 1997):  Pages 67 - 118.
Year of Publication: 1997.

20. Record Number: 837
Author(s): Appleby, David F.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Progress in Carolingian Saxony: A Case from Ninth- Century Corvey [the text recording the transferral of Saint Pusinna's relics to Herford in Saxony praises the Saxons before and after their conversion].
Source: Catholic Historical Review , 82., 4 (Oct. 1996):  Pages 599 - 613.
Year of Publication: 1996.

21. Record Number: 473
Author(s): Cooper, Kate
Contributor(s):
Title : A Saint in Exile: The Early Medieval Thecla at Rome and Meriamlik [literary and archaeological evidence of St. Thecla's cult].
Source: Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 1 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1995.

22. Record Number: 1647
Author(s): Durliat, Marcel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sculpture gothique. Un nouveau regard sur la châsse de Sainte Eulalie à la cathédrale de Barcelone [summary of an article by Josep Bracons Clapés, "Lupo di Francesco, mestre pisà, autor del sepulcre de Santa Eulàlia" published in D'Art 19 (1993): 43-51].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 153., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 80
Year of Publication: 1995.

23. Record Number: 1331
Author(s): Talbot, Alice-Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Posthumous Miracles of St. Photeine [identified by the Byzantines as the Samaritan woman who spoke with Jesus; her cult in Constantinople was active and known for healing eye diseases and blindness; article includes an English translation of BHG 1541m "The Discovery of the Relics of Holy Great Martyr Photeine and a Partial Account of Her Miracles"].
Source: Analecta Bollandiana , 112., 40180 ( 1994):  Pages 85 - 104. Reprinted in Women and Religious Life in Byzantium. By Alice-Mary Talbot. Variorum Collected Studies Series. Ashgate, 2001. Article 8
Year of Publication: 1994.

24. Record Number: 1842
Author(s): Talbot, Alice- Mary and Alexander Kazhdan
Contributor(s):
Title : The Byzantine Cult of St. Photeine
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 20., ( 1994):  Pages 103 - 112. Presence of Byzantium: Studies Presented to Milton V. Anastos in Honor of His Eighty-Fifth Birthday. Reprinted in Alice-Mary Talbot, Women and Religious Life in Byzantium. Variorum Collected Studies Series. Ashgate, 2001. Article 9.
Year of Publication: 1994.

25. Record Number: 10681
Author(s): Sharpe, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Date of Saint Mildreth's Translation from Minster-in-Thanet to Canterbury [According to Goscelin's account of the life of Saint Mildreth, the saint's remains were moved to Saint Augustine's Abbey in Canterbury on 18 May 1030. The author maintains that Goscelin's dating is correct even though other historians dispute his chronology (the write apparently names the wrong pope and wrong emperor in his account of the saint's life). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):  Pages 349 - 354.
Year of Publication: 1991.

26. Record Number: 12756
Author(s): Carrasco, Magdalena Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spirituality in Context: The Romanesque Illustrated Life of Saint Radegund of Poitiers (Poitiers, Bibliotheque Municipale, MS 250)
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 414 - 435.
Year of Publication: 1990.

27. Record Number: 12753
Author(s): Butler, Lawrence and James Graham-Campbell
Contributor(s):
Title : A Lost Reliquary Casket from Gwytherin, North Wales [The Church of Saint Winifrid at Gwytherin in North Wales once possessed a richly decorated casket containing the relics of the martyred virgin Saint Winifred (also known as Gwenfrewi or Winefride) of Wales. A drawing of the casket attributed to Edward Lluyd suggests that Winifred’s reliquary was probably produced in the eight or early ninth century and it was influenced by Anglo-Saxon and Irish decorative styles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Antiquaries Journal , 70., 1 ( 1990):  Pages 40 - 48.
Year of Publication: 1990.

28. Record Number: 28765
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Stavelot Triptych
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

29. Record Number: 30946
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Discovery and Proof of the True Cross
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

30. Record Number: 32129
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reliquary of the Hand of Saint Marina
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

31. Record Number: 36280
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Saint Catherine of Bologna with Three Donors
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

32. Record Number: 39181
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chemise of St Balthild
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

33. Record Number: 39186
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Opening of Saint Hedwig's Tomb; The Translation of Saint Hedwig's Relics
Source: Art Bulletin , 72., 3 ( 1990):
Year of Publication: