Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


  • Record Number: 8541
  • Author(s)/Creator(s): Mecham , June L
  • Contributor(s):
  • Title: Breaking Old Habits: Recent Research on Women, Spirituality, and the Arts in the Middle Ages
  • Source: History Compass 4, 3 ( 2006): Pages 448 - 480.
  • Description:
  • Article Type: Journal Article
  • Subject (See Also): Art History- General Artists Devotional Art Devotional Literature Devotional Practices Historiography Literature- Drama Liturgy Monasticism Patronage Spirituality Theology Women in Religion
  • Geographic Area: General
  • Century: 13- 14- 15
  • Related Resources:
  • Primary Evidence:
  • Illustrations: Seven figures. Figure One Robert Campin and Assistant, The Annunciation Triptych, altarpiece, circa 1425, South Netherlandish; made in Tournai, oil on wood (New York, Metropolitan Museum of Art, The Cloisters Collection, 1956 (56.70). Figure Two Christ child figure with arm raised in blessing from the Cistercian convent of Heilig-Kreuz in Rostock, with textile clothing and crown, circa 1500 (Schwerin, Staatliches Museum Schwerin, Kunstsammlungen, Inv.-Nr. Pl. 600). Figure Three Devotional crib for a Christ child, wood (Cologne, Museum Schnütgen, Inv.-Nr. A 779). Figure Four Elsbeth Stagel composing the Lives of the Sisters of Töss, late 14th century (Nuremberg, Stadtbibliothek Nürnberg, MS Cent. V 10a, fol. 3r). Figure Five Lectionary, early 14th century, German (Baltimore, The Walters Art Museum, Ms 148, fol. 23r.) Figure Six Effigy of Christ and Sepulcher, c. 1450, from the Cistercian convent of Wienhausen; wood (Wienhausen, Kloster Wienhausen). Figure Seven Mystical Marriage of St. Catherine with the Christ child, 1491, in the Antiphonale de sanctis from the Dominican convent of Heilig Kreuz in Regensburg, watercolor painting (Regensburg, Bischöfliche Zentralbibliothek, Bestand Ch). Includes illustrations of lay patron, Agnes Volkamer, and her niece, Magdalena Holzschuher.
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  • Abstract: The study of women, spirituality, and the arts has progressed considerably over the past twenty-five years, becoming both more nuanced and sophisticated as well as more conflicted. Recent scholarship on this subject reflects the adoption of broader definitions of the arts and of female religiosity in addition to a weakening of both conceptual and disciplinary boundaries. Current research further demonstrates a greater democratization in the types of women and pious activities studied. Researchers are increasingly re-conceptualizing piety in terms of grouped or interrelated actions tied to the visual and material culture of medieval Christianity, thereby highlighting the importance of performance within female devotion. While issues of essentialism and agency continue to stimulate debate, researchers have uncovered considerable evidence of the influence medieval women exerted upon religious drama, music, art, literature, and theology. Nevertheless, substantial areas for further research remain. [Reproduced from the journal website: http://www.blackwell-compass.com/subject/history/]
  • Author's Affiliation: University of Nebraska, Omaha
  • Conference Info: - , -
  • Year of Publication: 2006.
  • Language: English
  • ISSN/ISBN: 14780542
  • Material/Technique :
  • Rights: