Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


55 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 33198
Author(s): Courtemanche, Andrée and Steven Bednarski
Contributor(s):
Title : "Sadly and with a Bitter Heart": What the Caesarean Section Meant in the Middle Ages
Source: Florilegium , 28., ( 2011):  Pages 33 - 69.
Year of Publication: 2011.

2. Record Number: 29887
Author(s): Kueny, Kathryn
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cure of Perfection: Women's Obstetrics in Early and Medieval Islam
Source: Perspectives on Medieval Art: Learning through Looking.   Edited by Ena Giurescu Heller and Patricia C. Pongracz .   Museum of Biblical Art, 2010. Florilegium , 28., ( 2011):  Pages 187 - 197.
Year of Publication: 2010.

3. Record Number: 15887
Author(s): Anderson, Wendy Love.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Real Presence of Mary: Eucharistic Disbelief and the Limits of Orthodoxy in Fourteenth-Century France [The author analyses the case of Aude Fauré which was recorded in Bishop Jacques Fourniers' inquisitorial "Register." She gave two different accounts of her "error" in belief with the second version accepted by the tribunal and penances assigned. Anderson argues that Aude demonstrates a deeper theological understanding and a more complex spirituality than earlier scholars have recognized. Title notes upplied by Feminae.].
Source: Church History , 75., 4 (December 2006):  Pages 748 - 767.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 12502
Author(s): Green, Monica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodies, Gender, Health, Disease: Recent Work on Medieval Women's Medicine [An essay review covering work done in the 1990s and early 21st century on various aspects of text editing, "technologies of the body," sex differences, women as medical agents, the question of whether childbirth is an exclusively female space, and future directions of the field. Title note supplied by author.]
Source: Sexuality and Culture in Medieval and Renaissance Europe.   Edited by Philip M. Soergel Studies in medieval and renaissance history, 3rd ser., 2.   AMS Press, 2005. Church History , 75., 4 (December 2006):  Pages 1 - 46. Also part of the series: Studies in Medieval and Renaissance History Third Series 2 (Old Series 27, New Series 17) (2005). Sexuality and Culture in Medieval and Renaissance Europe
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 19231
Author(s): Keller, Hildegard Elisabeth
Contributor(s):
Title : Segreti. Uno studio semantico sulla mistica femminile medievale [Medieval mystics frequently wrote about hidden or secret realities. Didactic texts tried to teach an approach to these secrets, while autobiographies presented mysteries that the mystic had experienced. Female mystics, as well as some men, frequently presented their experience in erotic terms derived from the Bible and including terms for pregnancy and birth. Many of them said they were compelled to reveal secrets they had learned. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Storia delle donne 1 (2005): 201-220.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 11395
Author(s): Green, Monica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bibliography: Women and Medicine [Includes journal articles, editions of texts and translations, essays, and monographs. Each item has an informative annotation giving evaluative comments as well as a summary of contents. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 37., (Spring 2004):  Pages 35 - 39.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 11350
Author(s): Green, Monica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bibliography: Women and Medicine [Includes journal articles, editions of texts and translations, essays, and monographs. Each item has an informative annotation giving evaluative comments as well as a summary of contents. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 35., ( 2003):  Pages 19 - 23.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 8067
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Who is the Master of This Narrative? Maternal Patronage of the Cult of St. Margaret [The author argues that the needs of women in childbirth prevailed in the texts and images of Saint Margaret. The surviving artifacts emphasize her miraculous deliverance from the dragon although learned clerics tried to excise this doubtful incident from the tradition. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Medieval Feminist Forum , 37., (Spring 2004):  Pages 94 - 104.
Year of Publication: 2003.

9. Record Number: 11828
Author(s): Rawcliffe, Carole
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Childbirth, and Religion in Later Medieval England [The author traces the means by which the church offered support and aid to women facing childbirth. Rawcliffe also accounts for varied responses provided by popular religion including saints, shrines, and charms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Medieval Feminist Forum , 37., (Spring 2004):  Pages 91 - 117.
Year of Publication: 2003.

10. Record Number: 8642
Author(s): Lee, Becky R.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Company of Women and Men: Men's Recollections of Childbirth in Medieval England
Source: Journal of Family History , 27., 2 (April 2002):  Pages 92 - 100.
Year of Publication: 2002.

11. Record Number: 9501
Author(s): Lee, Becky R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men's Recollections of a Women's Rite: Medieval English Men's Recollections Regarding the Rite of the Purification of Women after Childbirth
Source: Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 224 - 241.
Year of Publication: 2002.

12. Record Number: 6634
Author(s): Larson, Wendy R.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Role of Patronage and Audience in the Cults of Sts. Margaret and Marina of Antioch [the author compares the cults of the two saints who share virtually the same "vita" but whose powers and devotees were very different; Saint Marina offered help against demonic influences in general to men and women alike while Saint Margaret was most venerated for the aid she offered to women and babies in childbirth].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002. Medieval Feminist Forum , 35., ( 2003):  Pages 23 - 35.
Year of Publication: 2002.

13. Record Number: 6221
Author(s): L'Estrange, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Incarnations and Confinements: the (in)visibility of childbirth in some late-medieval sources
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. Medieval Feminist Forum , 35., ( 2003):
Year of Publication: 2002.

14. Record Number: 8423
Author(s): Gilbertson, Leanne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Vanni Altarpiece and the Relic Cult of Saint Margaret: Considering a Female Audience [The author argues that the altarpiece, originally in the cathedral of Montefiascone, was associated with the saint's tomb there. The altarpiece highlights St. Margaret's role as a helper to women in childbirth. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Decorations for the holy dead: visual embellishments on tombs and shrines of saints.   Edited by Stephen Lamia and Elizabeth Valdez del Álamo International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 2002. Medieval Feminist Forum , 35., ( 2003):  Pages 179 - 190.
Year of Publication: 2002.

15. Record Number: 5374
Author(s): Elsakkers, Marianne.
Contributor(s):
Title : In Pain You Shall Bear Children (Gen. 3:16): Medieval Prayers for a Safe Delivery [The author argues in part that the rhythms of the "Peperit" charm helped a pregnant woman adjust to the different stages of labor; the Appendix reproduces the texts of four versions of the "Peperit" charm].
Source: Women and Miracle Stories: A Multidisciplinary Exploration.   Edited by Anne-Marie Korte Studies in the History of Religions, 88.   Brill, 2001. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 15., 2 (June 2001):  Pages 179 - 207.
Year of Publication: 2001.

16. Record Number: 6632
Author(s): Skemer, Don C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Amulet Rolls and Female Devotion in the Late Middle Ages [medieval written amulets in scroll form rarely survive, but those that do frequently are intended to guarantee safety in pregnancy and childbirth; these amulets might be read aloud, bound to the woman or even fed to her; many of the surviving rolls are dedicated to Margaret of Antioch, the patron saint of pregnant women; this article edits one such roll (with the Latin text presented in the appendix) and provides a plate with a picture of the original; its mention of Saint Sigismund, a Burgundian martyr, may point to an origin in or near the ancient Burgundian realm; some of the charms are general ones, intended to provide generalized protection; but others make specific reference to childbirth, the greatest period of danger in many women's lives; other religious objects, including books of hours, were expected to serve similar protective purposes].
Source: Scriptorium , 55., 2 ( 2001):  Pages 197 - 227.
Year of Publication: 2001.

17. Record Number: 5858
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Weasels and Pregnancy in Renaissance Italy
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 15., 2 (June 2001):  Pages 172 - 187.
Year of Publication: 2001.

18. Record Number: 4873
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Medical Practice and Health Care in Medieval Europe [In this essay review, the author surveys work that had been done up through 1988 on different aspects of women's engagements with medicine, both as patients and as practitioners. She argues that the general assumption that "women's health was women's business" is misleading, both because it overestimates the exclusivity of women's practice on other women and because it overlooks abundant evidence that men, too, were involved in women's healthcare. Accompanying this reprint of the original 1989 version are important corrigenda and addenda. Originally published in Signs 14, 2 (1989): 434-473. Repubished in "Sisters and Workers in the Middle Ages." Edited by Judith M. Bennett et al. University of Chicago Press, 1989. Title note supplied by author.].
Source: Women's Healthcare in the Medieval West: Texts and Contexts.   Edited by Monica H. Green Variorum Collected Studies Series, 680.   Ashgate Publishing, 2000.  Pages 39 - 78. Originally published in Signs 14, 2 (1989): 434-473. Repubished in "Sisters and Workers in the Middle Ages." Edited by Judith M. Bennett et al. University of Chicago Press, 1989.
Year of Publication: 2000.

19. Record Number: 4876
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Obstetrical and Gynecological Texts in Middle English [The author complies a list of Middle English manuscripts that contain different texts on childbirth, women’s health, sexuality, and cosmetics. Some of the manuscripts also contain medicinal and culinary recipes. Many of the medical complications are attributed to the female healer Trota (or Trotula) of Salerno, but others are attributed to male authors like Galen and Hippocrates. Although the Trotula texts were popular in late medieval England, the manuscripts indicate that the most widely disseminated medical text was “The Sekeness of Wymmen” by Gilbertus Anglicus. The textual and codicological evidence of these manuscripts suggests that both men and women (and both physicians and laypersons) possessed and read these texts. The author describes each manuscript and lists its contents, and the appendix transcribes a new manuscript (the Middle English "Nature of Wommen") that has never been described. Originally published in Studies in the Age of Chaucer 14 (1992): 53-88. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: 2000. Originally published in Studies in the Age of Chaucer 14 (1992): 53-88.
Year of Publication: 2000.

20. Record Number: 5127
Author(s): Cormack, Margaret
Contributor(s):
Title : Fyr kné Meyio: Notes on Childbirth in Medieval Iceland [The author examines various texts that describe childbirth; she concludes that there were a variety of positions that the laboring woman could assume but they did not include on hands and knees].
Source: Saga Book , 25., 3 ( 2000):  Pages 314 - 315.
Year of Publication: 2000.

21. Record Number: 4685
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Learned Reading, Vernacular Seeing: Jacques Daret's "Presentation in the Temple"
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 82, 3 (September 2000): 428-452. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2000.

22. Record Number: 4312
Author(s): Gibson, Gail McMurray.
Contributor(s):
Title : Scene and Obscene: Seeing and Performing Late Medieval Childbirth
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 29., 1 (Winter 1999):  Pages 7 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 6503
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medici-Tornabuoni "Desco da Parto" in Context [the author argues that the large and elaborately painted birth tray now in the Metropolitan Museum was given by Piero de Medici to his wife Lucrezia Tornabuoni on the birth of their son, Lorenzo de Medici; the author explores the production and use of birth trays in the celebration of childbirth in post-plague Italy].
Source: Metropolitan Museum Journal , 33., ( 1998):  Pages 137 - 151.
Year of Publication: 1998.

24. Record Number: 4353
Author(s): Paxson, James J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Nether-Faced Devil and the Allegory of Parturition [The author argues that the representation of the devil with a face in place of its genitals draws on the allegory of childbirth and thereby demonizes the female sexual body].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 19., ( 1998):  Pages 139 - 176.
Year of Publication: 1998.

25. Record Number: 3396
Author(s): Neff, Amy.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Pain of "Compassio": Mary's Labor at the Foot of the Cross
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 80, 2 (June 1998): 254-273. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

26. Record Number: 3668
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Imaginative Conceptions in Renaissance Italy [The author argues that women were encouraged to fulfill their maternal role through a wide variety of images and objects that emphasized the delivery of healthy, male babies].
Source: Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.   Edited by Geraldine A. Johnson and Sara F. Mathews Grieco .   Cambridge University Press, 1997. Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 42 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1997.

27. Record Number: 2507
Author(s): Stottlemyer, Ronald.
Contributor(s):
Title : Birgitta of Sweden and the Divine Mysteries of Motherhood [discussion of her theology of motherhood that was based on her vision of Mary giving birth to the baby Jesus].
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 24., (Fall 1997):  Pages 31 - 37.
Year of Publication: 1997.

28. Record Number: 2772
Author(s): Brunner, Karl.
Contributor(s):
Title : Leopold III. von Österreich. Wege zur Heiligkeit
Source: Homme: Zeitschrift für feministische Geschichtswissenschaft , 7., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 34 - 45.
Year of Publication: 1996.

29. Record Number: 2770
Author(s): Schäfer, Daniel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Embryulkie zwishen Mythos, Recht und Medizin: Zur Überlieferungsgeschichte von Sectio in mortua und Embryotomie in Spätantike und Mittelalter
Source: Medizinhistorisches Journal , 31., 40241 ( 1996):  Pages 275 - 297.
Year of Publication: 1996.

30. Record Number: 2990
Author(s): Haas, Louis.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Childbearing in Medieval Florence [highlights the female networks of family and friends that help in childbirth].
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Medizinhistorisches Journal , 31., 40241 ( 1996):  Pages 87 - 99.
Year of Publication: 1996.

31. Record Number: 3586
Author(s): McInerney, Maud Burnett.
Contributor(s):
Title : In the Meydens Womb: Julian of Norwich and the Poetics of Enclosure
Source: Medieval Mothering.   Edited by John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Medizinhistorisches Journal , 31., 40241 ( 1996):  Pages 157 - 182.
Year of Publication: 1996.

32. Record Number: 2991
Author(s): Stoertz, Fiona Harris.
Contributor(s):
Title : Suffering and Survival in Medieval English Childbirth [argues that people cared for women suffering in childbirth and that the mother's life was more highly valued than that of the baby].
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Medizinhistorisches Journal , 31., 40241 ( 1996):  Pages 101 - 120.
Year of Publication: 1996.

33. Record Number: 6014
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Femmes et la mort à la fin du moyen age [the author provides an overview of female mortality based on statistics taken from Florentine ricordanze (which often included family memoirs) for both girls and married women; the author notes the discrepancy in female versus male survival rates with men living in significantly larger proportions from childhood onward; the author also notes the higher mortality rates for women due to death during childbirth].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995.  Pages 207 - 221.
Year of Publication: 1995.

34. Record Number: 590
Author(s): Weston, L. M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Medicine, Women's Magic: The Old English Metrical Childbirth Charms
Source: Modern Philology (Full Text via JSTOR) 92, 3 (February 1995): 279-293. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

35. Record Number: 15
Author(s): Henderson, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Miraculous Childbirth and the Portinari Altarpiece
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 77, 2 (June 1995): 249-261. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

36. Record Number: 16623
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane
Contributor(s):
Title : Les femmes dans les rituels de l'alliance et de la naissance à Florence [Christiane Klapisch-Zuber explores Florentine women's roles in rituals celebrating marriage and childbirth. She looks in particular at the meanings of "cassoni" (wedding chests) and "deschi da parto" (painted plates associated with the birth of children). She frequently finds situations in which the needs of the patrilineage and family honor trump the concerns of wives, mothers, and their natal families. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Riti e rituali nelle società medievali.   Edited by Jacques Chiffoleau, Lauro Martines, and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani .   Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 1994.  Pages 3 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1994.

37. Record Number: 8480
Author(s): Rubin, Miri.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Person in the Form: Medieval Challenges to Bodily "Order" [The author discusses a number of instances in which the order and hierarchy of the body were violated. In terms of gender issues, the author briefly considers hermaphrodites, Jews accused of performing abortions, and the doubts a peasant woman near Montaillou had about Christ's divinity because of her horror at the shameful filth that the Virgin Mary must have delivered in childbirth along with the infant Christ. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994.  Pages 100 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1994.

38. Record Number: 7243
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Conceived in Sins, Born in Delights: Stories of Procreation from Early Ireland [The author argues that the surviving narratives of sex, conception, pregnancy, and childbirth from eight and ninth-century Ireland represent an exclusively male ideology, and reveal masculine attempts to co-opt the procreative process more generally. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the History of Sexuality , 3., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 181 - 202.
Year of Publication: 1992.

39. Record Number: 11225
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Relic, Some Pictures and the Mothers of Florence in the Late Fourteenth Century
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 30, 2 (1991): 91-99. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

40. Record Number: 10604
Author(s): Greilsammer, Myriam.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Midwife, the Priest, and the Physician: The Subjugation of Midwives in the Low Countries at the End of the Middle Ages [The author traces the varied factors that contributed to the reduction of both status and scope of activity for midwives. Greilsammer argues that the church and civic authorities cooperated to limit midwives while promoting physicians in their place. The appendices include Flemish texts documenting the practices of midwives in city ordinances and oaths of office. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 21., 2 (Fall 1991):  Pages 285 - 329.
Year of Publication: 1991.

41. Record Number: 12743
Author(s): Keefer, Sarah Larratt.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Monastic Echo in an Old English Charm [The Old English metrical poem most commonly known as “Charm for Delayed Birth” is often interpreted as a magical incantation intended to protect a woman from a spontaneous miscarriage or stillbirth. Although the poem may have origins in pagan practices, the poem’s references to Bethlehem and the Nativity give it Christian relevance. Moreover, the poem repeatedly echoes monastic references to scripture and liturgy, giving the poem an oral quality that could serve a prayerful or devotional purpose instead of just being a pagan incantation with Christian terminology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 71 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1990.

42. Record Number: 13260
Author(s): Gibson, Gail McMurray.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saint Anne and the Religion of Childbed: Some East Anglian Texts and Talismans [The feast of Saint Anne existed in England before it received official recognition in 1382. East Anglian devotion to Anne focused on family ties and childbirth. Osbern Bokenham's poems about Anne were written for Katherine Denston, who desired vainly the birth of a son. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Interpreting Cultural Symbols: Saint Anne in Late Medieval Society.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Pamela Sheingorn .   The University of Georgia Press, 1990. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 21., 2 (Fall 1991):  Pages 95 - 110.
Year of Publication: 1990.

43. Record Number: 12698
Author(s): Turner, Ralph V.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Children of Anglo-Norman Royalty and Their Upbringing [Although royals did demonstrate affection toward their children (both legitimate and illegitimate), aristocratic parents did not consider childcare their primary responsibility. Although noblewomen participated in the education of children, they saw other roles as more important: supervising household affairs, acting as regents when their husbands were away, giving birth to heirs, and negotiating marriage alliances for their sons and daughters. Many other people (including household servants, nurses, and relatives) shared the responsibility of childrearing. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 11., 2 (Autumn 1990):  Pages 17 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1990.

44. Record Number: 11195
Author(s): de Looze, Laurence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France et la Textualisation: Arbre, Enfant, Oeuvre dans le Lai de "Fresne" [Throughout the poem, Marie de France exploits metaphorical language that connects the process of procreation (the birth of a child through sexual reproduction) and the generation of a text by a writer. The metaphorical correspondence between the labor or “work” of writing and the labor of childbirth informs the language of many French texts written during this time. The anxieties expressed by modern scholars who attempt to use manuscripts to reconstruct a pure and authorial edition of a text thus reflect medieval writers’ own anxieties about the legitimacy of sexual and textual reproduction. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 4 ( 1990):  Pages 396 - 408.
Year of Publication: 1990.

45. Record Number: 15603
Author(s): Lemay, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Literature of Obstetrics and Gynecology [The author argues that the practices of learned physicians should not be held in opposition to those of midwives. Some folklore was adapted into the humoral system of medicine. In other cases doctors accepted superstitious cures particularly in childbirth and fertility where problems needed decisive remedies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History.   Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal .   University of Georgia Press, 1990. Romanic Review , 81., 4 ( 1990):  Pages 189 - 209.
Year of Publication: 1990.

46. Record Number: 28736
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Nativity
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Intesa_nativity.jpg/250px-Intesa_nativity.jpg
Year of Publication:

47. Record Number: 28815
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Birth of St. John the Baptist
Source:
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48. Record Number: 28816
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Desco da parto [birth tray]: Birthing Chamber Scene (obverse view)
Source:
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49. Record Number: 30926
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Nativity of the Virgin
Source:
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50. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Nativity and First Bath of the Christ Child
Source:
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51. Record Number: 31225
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Adoration of the Shepherds at the Nativity, with a young female book owner adoring the Virgin
Source:
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52. Record Number: 31274
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Birth of Julius Caesar (Les Faits des Romains)
Source:
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53. Record Number: 31275
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Birth of Julius Caesar (Commentaires de Cesar)
Source:
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54. Record Number: 31299
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Birth of Julius Caesar (Commentaires de Cesar)
Source:
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55. Record Number: 40711
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Birth girdle
Source:
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