Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


60 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 32975
Author(s): Crawford, Sally
Contributor(s):
Title : Baptism and Infant Burial in Anglo-Saxon England
Source: Medieval Life Cycles: Continuity and Change.   Edited by Isabelle Cochelin and Karen Smyth .   Brepols, 2013.  Pages 55 - 80.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 32228
Author(s): Urbano Afonso, Luis,
Contributor(s):
Title : Eros et Thanatos: The Tomb of King Pedro in Alcobaca and its Wheel of Life and Fortune (1358-1363)
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 33., 65 ( 2012):  Pages 9 - 41.
Year of Publication: 2012.

3. Record Number: 17108
Author(s): Fleming, Robin
Contributor(s):
Title : Bones for Historians: Putting the Body back into Biography [The author begins with a case study of a woman's skeleton from a cemetery near Barrington in Cambridgeshire. She was not quite twenty when she died and had extremely rich grave goods including a bed, one of only eleven such bed burials known in England. Surprisingly her skull gives evidence of an advance stage of leprosy and her lower legs were also badly infected. Fleming then considers skeletal evidence for questions about mortality by gender, the impact of children's chronic health problems on their lives as adults, and the health dangers present in urban settings. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Writing Medieval Biography, 750-1250: Essays in Honour of Professor Frank Barlow.   Edited by David Bates, Julia Crick, and Sarah Hamilton .   Boydell Press, 2006. Artibus et Historiae , 33., 65 ( 2012):  Pages 29 - 48.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 24522
Author(s): Cavell, Emma.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Burial of Noblewomen in Thirteenth-Century Shropshire [The author examines evidence of the burial locations of Shropshire noble women during the long thirteenth century (1150 to 1350 C.E.). Cavell finds a connection between a woman’s possession of land as an heiress and her freedom to determine her own place of burial and the associated gifts to the monastery involved. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Thirteenth Century England , 11., ( 2005):  Pages 174 - 191.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 11758
Author(s): Heller, Ena Giurescu.
Contributor(s):
Title : Access to Salvation: The Place (and Space) of Women Patrons in Fourteenth-century Florence [The author provides a case study of Monna Andrea Acciaiuoli's patronage of her husband's family chapel in Santa Maria Novella. She commissioned the glass windows and the altarpiece. Heller raises the question of whether Monna Andrea and other female patrons had access to these family chapels beyond the rood screen. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. Artibus et Historiae , 33., 65 ( 2012):  Pages 161 - 183.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 20782
Author(s): Trout, Dennis
Contributor(s):
Title : Theodelinda's Rome: "Ampullae," "Pittacia," and the Image of the City [Describes the political significance of Theodelinda's patronage of a collection of oils from the Roman "martyria," its repercussions on her relationship with Pope Gregory the Great, and that of Lombardy with the papacy in Rome. Also investigates how the burial locations of saints defined the layout of medieval cities. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 50., ( 2005):  Pages 131 - 145.
Year of Publication: 2005.

7. Record Number: 14634
Author(s): Michalsky, Tanja.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mater serenissimi principis: The Tomb of Maria of Hungary
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 61 - 77.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 18563
Author(s): Argenziano, Raffaele
Contributor(s):
Title : Corpi santi e immagini nella Siena medievale: L'iconografia dei sepolcri di Gioacchino da Siena e di Aldobrandesca Ponzi [This article analyzes the tombs and decorations of two Sienese saints, one of whom is Aldobrandesca Ponzi, a tertiary member of the Humiliati order. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 48 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2004.

9. Record Number: 10932
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ekphrasis at Kildare: The Imaginative Architecture of a Seventh Century Hagiographer [The author argues that the hagiographer Cogitosus wrote an extensive descripton of the church at Kildare in his "Vita" of Saint Brigit in order to link the space more closely with her sainted presence. Visitors to Kildare were not only connecting to Brigit, but to the center of Christian history with the church's borrowings from Rome. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 605 - 627.
Year of Publication: 2004.

10. Record Number: 14641
Author(s): Gardner, Julian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Santa Maria Donna Regina in its European Context [The author argues for Santa Maria Donna Regina's importance as a royal monastery for women. Other contemporary examples like Longchamps and Poissy do not survive. Furthermore, Mary of Hungary's tomb and the extensive fresco program incorporate complex dynastic and sacred themes. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 195 - 201.
Year of Publication: 2004.

11. Record Number: 13144
Author(s): Grauer, A. L
Contributor(s):
Title : Where were the Women?
Source: Human Biologists in the Archives.   Edited by Ann Herring and Alan C. Swedlund .   Cambridge University Press, 2003. Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 201 - 224.
Year of Publication: 2003.

12. Record Number: 11961
Author(s): Wood, Charles T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fontevraud, Dynasticism, and Eleanor of Aquitaine
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 377 - 405.
Year of Publication: 2003.

13. Record Number: 10901
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Tomb of Adelaide of Maurienne and the Visual Imagery of Capetian Queenship [The author argues that while Adelaide's seal establishes her authority through stable conservative imagery, her tomb sculpture marks her as an individual with a special connection to the sacred site. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 45 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2003.

14. Record Number: 11960
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Queen's Choice: Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Tombs at Fontevraud [The tombs Eleanor of Aquitaine commissioned for Henry II, Richard I, and herself at Fontevrault, with their life-like images of royalty, were novel in their day. Eleanor was probably not inspired by royal tombs she saw on her travels, although Capetian queens' tombs had incised images. Eleanor's own tomb showed her as a living person, whereas the others were shown lying in state. It appears that Eleanor took charge of all these commemorations of the Plantagenet dead. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 377 - 405.
Year of Publication: 2003.

15. Record Number: 11824
Author(s): Crawford, Sally.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anglo-Saxon Women, Furnished Burial, and the Church [The author discusses the possible meanings of women's burials during the Conversion Period in Anglo-Saxon England. Scholars have attributed Christian or non-Christian beliefs to the locations of burials (churchyards, barrows, and ancestral graveyards), presence or absence of grave goods, and inclusion of seemingly Christian symbols like cruciform jewellry. The need for high status families to display their prestige and wealth through an ostentatious burial of a female member is also an important consideration. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 1 - 12.
Year of Publication: 2003.

16. Record Number: 8422
Author(s): Rico Camps, Daniel.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Shrine in its Setting: San Vicente de Ávila [As a part of this article the author briefly describes (pp. 67-68) the shrine of Saint Vincent's two sisters, Sabina and Cristeta, who were martyred along with him. The author argues that the shrine was constructed at the same time as St. Vincent's more imposing tomb in the late twelfth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Decorations for the holy dead: visual embellishments on tombs and shrines of saints.   Edited by Stephen Lamia and Elizabeth Valdez del Álamo International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 2002. Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 57 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2002.

17. Record Number: 8424
Author(s): Español, Francesca.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sepulchre of Saint Juliana in the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar [The author argues that the reliefs of St. Juliana, the Virgin and Child, Christ in Majesty, and apostles all originally decorated a monumental sepulchre of the martyr Saint Juliana in the latter half of the twelfth century. In the fifteenth century Bishop Alonso de Cartagena translated her relics to an altar and remodelled the now-empty tomb to take up less space. Perhaps local devotion required the continued presence of the tomb. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Decorations for the holy dead: visual embellishments on tombs and shrines of saints.   Edited by Stephen Lamia and Elizabeth Valdez del Álamo International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 2002. Iconographica , 3., ( 2004):  Pages 191 - 218.
Year of Publication: 2002.

18. Record Number: 16595
Author(s): Karkov, Catherine E. and Kelley M. Wickham-Crowley
Contributor(s):
Title : Last (w)Rites and Material Girls: Death, Memory, and Anglo-Saxon Women
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

19. Record Number: 15867
Author(s): Deliyannis, Deborah Mauskopf.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bury me in Ravenna? Appropriating Galla Placidia's Body in the Middle Ages [The author argues that twelfth and thirteenth century writers in Ravenna emphasized the importance of Empress Galla Placidia and her supposed burial site. In so doing they sought to glorify the city's importance during troubled political times. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studi Medievali , 42., 1 (Giugno 2001):  Pages 289 - 299.
Year of Publication: 2001.

20. Record Number: 5787
Author(s): Walker, Rose.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Royal and Aristocratic Burial in Northern Spain, c. 950- c. 1250 [the author points out that the most successful efforts toward "memoria" were made by a united and strong royal couple and put into the hands of a female foundation; the two outstanding examples of royal pantheons are San Isidoro at León (built by King Fernando I and Queen Sancha with the subsequent support of their daughter Urraca) and Las Huelgas (built by King Alfonso VIII and Queen Eleanor)].
Source: Medieval Memories: Men, Women, and the Past, 700-1300.   Edited by Elisabeth van Houts .   Women and Men in History Series. Longman, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 150 - 172.
Year of Publication: 2001.

21. Record Number: 6237
Author(s): Kohl, Benjamin G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fina da Carrara, née Buzzacarini: Consort, Mother, and Patron of Art in Trecento Padua [the author provides some information about Fina's family, the Buzzacarini, and about the Carrara including the four children that Fina bore; Fina's patronage activities concern her tomb in the Baptistery with frescoes by Giusto de'Menabuoi; the author notes the portraits of Fina represented there, not only the donor portrait but the representation of Fina and her three daughters as onlookers at the birth of John the Baptist].
Source: Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Sheryl E. Reiss and David G. Wilkins .   Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, Volume 54. Truman State University Press, 2001. Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001):  Pages 19 - 35.
Year of Publication: 2001.

22. Record Number: 5630
Author(s): Scull, Christopher.
Contributor(s):
Title : How the Dead Live: Some Current Approaches to the Mortuary Archaeology of England in the Fifth to Eighth Centuries A.D [This review essay focuses in part on "The Spindle and the Spear. A Critical Enquiry into the Construction and Meaning of Gender in the Early Anglo-Saxon Burial Rite" by Nick Stoodley].
Source: Archaeological Journal , 157., ( 2000):  Pages 399 - 406.
Year of Publication: 2000.

23. Record Number: 4677
Author(s): Callahan, Leslie Abend.
Contributor(s):
Title : En Remembrance e en memoire: Grief, Memory, and Memorialization in the "Lais" of Marie de France ["My aim here is twofold: to explore how grief- the raw material of one kind of memory- is represented in the 'Lais,' and what those representations might tell us about attitudes toward death and commemoration at the time of Marie's transcription/transformation of the material of the "lais;" and then to demonstrate that in the "Lais" an object- the tomb- functions as a repository of grief and memory, and to suggest that the building of the tomb can be viewed as a metaphor for the construction of the "lai." Page 260].
Source: Romance Notes , 40., 3 (Spring 2000):  Pages 259 - 270.
Year of Publication: 2000.

24. Record Number: 3956
Author(s): Holman, Beth L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Exemplum and "Imitatio" : Countess Matilda and Lucrezia Pico della Mirandola at Polirone Italy [the Appendix reproduces four documents in Latin concerning Lucrezia Pico della Mirandola and the monastery at Polirone].
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 81,4 (December 1999): 637-664. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

25. Record Number: 3742
Author(s): Hadley, D. M. and J. M. Moore
Contributor(s):
Title : Death Makes the Man?: Burial Rite and the Construction of Maculinities in the Early Middle Ages
Source: Masculinity in Medieval Europe.   Edited by D.M. Hadley .   Women and Men in History Series. Addison Wesley Longman, 1999. Archaeological Journal , 157., ( 2000):  Pages 21 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1999.

26. Record Number: 3250
Author(s): Aström, Berit.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Creation of the Anglo-Saxon Woman [brief study of three cases in which scholars have minimized or misinterpreted the role of Anglo-Saxon women: Grendel's mother, the "Wife's Lament," and the excavation of two women in an Anglo-Saxon cemetery, one of whom may have been raped].
Source: Studia Neophilologica , 70., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 25 - 34.
Year of Publication: 1998.

27. Record Number: 2445
Author(s): Lucy, S.J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Housewives, Warriors, and Slaves? Sex and Gender in Anglo-Saxon Burials [based on a study of two Yorkshire cemeteries, the author questions the traditional assumption of sex based on grave good assemblages of either jewelry or weapons; urges a more nuanced analysis that takes social relations, symbolism, and cultural affiliations into consideration as well as gender].
Source: Invisible People and Processes: Writing Gender and Childhood into European Archaeology.   Edited by Jenny Moore and Eleanor Scott .   Leicester University Press, 1997. Studia Neophilologica , 70., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 150 - 168.
Year of Publication: 1997.

28. Record Number: 2443
Author(s): Gilchrist, Roberta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ambivalent Bodies: Gender and Medieval Archaeology [argues that medieval archaeology has been largely gender-neutral and has missed both female and male agency ; includes short case studies of the gift-exchange of women, burial and commemoration for women and men, and gender and housing].
Source: Invisible People and Processes: Writing Gender and Childhood into European Archaeology.   Edited by Jenny Moore and Eleanor Scott .   Leicester University Press, 1997. Studia Neophilologica , 70., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 42 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1997.

29. Record Number: 2898
Author(s): Parsons, John Carmi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Never was a body buried in England with such solemnity and honour': The Burials and Posthumous Commemorations of English Queens to 1500
Source: Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe: Proceedings of a Conference Held at King's College London, April 1995.   Edited by Anne J. Duggan .   Boydell Press, 1997. Studia Neophilologica , 70., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 317 - 337.
Year of Publication: 1997.

30. Record Number: 660
Author(s): Halsall, Guy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Status and Power in Early Merovingian Central Austrasia: The Burial Evidence [women of child- bearing age had the most lavish burials because their deaths threatened family status the most].
Source: Early Medieval Europe , 5., 1 ( 1996):  Pages 1 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1996.

31. Record Number: 769
Author(s): Valdez Del Alamo, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lament for a Lost Queen: The Sarcophagus of Doña Blanca in Nájera
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 78, 2 (June 1996): 311-333. Link Info Later published in Memory and the Medieval Tomb. Edited by Elizabeth Valdez del Alamo with Carol Stamatis Pendergast. Ashgate, 2000. Pages 43-79.
Year of Publication: 1996.

32. Record Number: 6328
Author(s): Koch, Ursula.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Hierarchie der Frauen in merowingischer Zeit, beobachtet in Pleidelsheim (Kr. Ludwigsburg) und Klepsau (Hohenlohekreis)
Source: Königen, Klosterfrau, Bäuerin: Frauen im Frühmittelalter. Bericht zur dritten Tagung des Netzwerks archäologisch arbeitender Frauen 19.-22. Oktober 1995 in Kiel.   Edited by Helga Brandt and Julie K. Koch .   Agenda, 1996.  Pages 29 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1996.

33. Record Number: 6331
Author(s): Sasse, Barbara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Archäologische und schriftliche Quellen zu Merowinger-Königinnen
Source: Königen, Klosterfrau, Bäuerin: Frauen im Frühmittelalter. Bericht zur dritten Tagung des Netzwerks archäologisch arbeitender Frauen 19.-22. Oktober 1995 in Kiel.   Edited by Helga Brandt and Julie K. Koch .   Agenda, 1996.  Pages 83 - 116.
Year of Publication: 1996.

34. Record Number: 982
Author(s): Lifshitz, Felice.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Martyr, the Tomb, and the Matron: Gendering the Past, 313-794
Source: Medieval Feminist Newsletter , 21., (Spring 1996):  Pages 30 - 32.
Year of Publication: 1996.

35. Record Number: 778
Author(s): Effros, Bonnie
Contributor(s):
Title : Symbolic Expressions of Sanctity: Gertrude of Nivelles in the Context of Merovingian Mortuary Custom
Source: Viator , 27., ( 1996):  Pages 1 - 10.
Year of Publication: 1996.

36. Record Number: 669
Author(s): Neville, Grace.
Contributor(s):
Title : Short Shrouds and Sharp Shrews: Echoes of Jacques de Vitry in the "Dánta Grádha" [exemplum about the wife who skimps on her husband's funeral].
Source: The Fragility of Her Sex?: Medieval Irishwomen in Their European Context.   Edited by Christine Meek and Katherine Simms .   Four Courts Press, 1996. Viator , 27., ( 1996):  Pages 87 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1996.

37. Record Number: 163
Author(s): Dinn, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monuments Answerable to Men's Worth: Burial Patterns, Social Status, and Gender in Late Medieval Bury St. Edmunds
Source: Journal of Ecclesiastical History , 46., 2 (Apr. 1995):  Pages 237 - 255.
Year of Publication: 1995.

38. Record Number: 230
Author(s): Long, Jane C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Salvation Through Meditation: The Tomb Frescoes in the Holy Confessors Chapel at Santa Croce in Florence [one prominently portrays a female donor]
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 1 (1995): 77-88. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

39. Record Number: 572
Author(s): Tuten, Belle Stoddard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Disputing Corpses: Le Ronceray d'Angers Versus Saint-Nicolas d'Angers, Ca. 1080-1140 [nuns and monks contest parish boundaries and the rights to burials and offerings].
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 10., ( 1995):  Pages 178 - 188. Proceedings of the Twentieth Annual Conference of the Southeastern Medieval Association
Year of Publication: 1995.

40. Record Number: 4684
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women as Patrons: Nuns, Widows, and Rulers
Source: Siena, Florence, and Padua: Art, Society, and Religion, 1280-1400. Volume II: Case Studies.   Edited by Diana Norman .   Yale University Press in association with The Open University, 1995. Medieval Perspectives , 10., ( 1995):  Pages 242 - 266.
Year of Publication: 1995.

41. Record Number: 6021
Author(s): Pinchard, Bruno.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Mort de la dame. Mythologie d'un marbre selon Dante [The author traces similarities between Dante's writings and the tomb of Ilaria del Carretto, wife of the lord of Lucca].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995. Medieval Perspectives , 10., ( 1995):  Pages 305 - 314.
Year of Publication: 1995.

42. Record Number: 8534
Author(s): Buchet, Luc and Christian Pilet
Contributor(s):
Title : Des femmes orientales en basse Normandie au Ve Siècle
Source: La Femme pendant le Moyen Âge et l'époque moderne. Actes des Sixiémes Journées Anthropologiques de Valbonne 9-10-11 juin 1992.   Edited by Luc Buchet Dossier de Documentation Archéologique, 17.   CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques) Éditions, 1994.  Pages 111 - 127.
Year of Publication: 1994.

43. Record Number: 1749
Author(s): Hoare, Peter G. and Caroline S. Sweet
Contributor(s):
Title : A Grave Error Concerning the Demise of "Hunstanton Woman" [long thought to date from the Ice Age, radiocarbon tests indicate that the skeleton is Anglo-Saxon, dating to the period 656-892 C.E.].
Source: Antiquity , 68., 260 (September 1994):  Pages 590 - 596.
Year of Publication: 1994.

44. Record Number: 8530
Author(s): Danion, Bertille, Christine Dumont and Jean- Yves Langlois
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Moniales cisterciennes de l'abbaye de Maubuisson (Val-d'Oise), à travers les différents lieux d'inhumations
Source: La Femme pendant le Moyen Âge et l'époque moderne. Actes des Sixiémes Journées Anthropologiques de Valbonne 9-10-11 juin 1992.   Edited by Luc Buchet Dossier de Documentation Archéologique, 17.   CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques) Éditions, 1994.  Pages 13 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1994.

45. Record Number: 5097
Author(s): Favreau, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le Culte de Sainte Radegonde à Poitiers au Moyen Áge
Source: Les Religieuses dans le Cloître et dans le Monde des Origines à Nos Jours. Actes du Deuxième Colloque International de C.E.R.C.O.R. Poitiers, 29 septembre-2 octobre 1988. .   Publications de l'Université de Sainte-Etienne, 1994. Antiquity , 68., 260 (September 1994):  Pages 91 - 109.
Year of Publication: 1994.

46. Record Number: 8532
Author(s): Gallien, Véronique.
Contributor(s):
Title : La femme: Témoin de l'evolution du cimetière de la basilique à Saint-Denis durant le haut moyen âge
Source: La Femme pendant le Moyen Âge et l'époque moderne. Actes des Sixiémes Journées Anthropologiques de Valbonne 9-10-11 juin 1992.   Edited by Luc Buchet Dossier de Documentation Archéologique, 17.   CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques) Éditions, 1994. Antiquity , 68., 260 (September 1994):  Pages 69 - 86.
Year of Publication: 1994.

47. Record Number: 16624
Author(s): Hughes, Diane Owen
Contributor(s):
Title : Mourning Rites, Memory, and Civilization in Premodern Italy [Diane Owen-Hughes argues that women's active role in mourning was a longstanding tradition of the Mediterranean and was frequently accomodated by Church officials. In late medieval Italy civic authorities acted to marginalize women's involvement by legislating their behavior, the kinds of mourning garb they could wear, and, in many cases, preventing even close female relatives from attending the funeral mass and burial. A male commemoration was given preference instead with men's funerary oratory and the new movement torward constructing elaborate tombs. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Riti e rituali nelle società medievali.   Edited by Jacques Chiffoleau, Lauro Martines, and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani .   Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 1994. Antiquity , 68., 260 (September 1994):  Pages 23 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1994.

48. Record Number: 8533
Author(s): Blondiaux, Joël.
Contributor(s):
Title : A propos de la dame d'Hochfelden et de la pratique cavalière: Discussion autour des sites fonctionnels fémoraux
Source: La Femme pendant le Moyen Âge et l'époque moderne. Actes des Sixiémes Journées Anthropologiques de Valbonne 9-10-11 juin 1992.   Edited by Luc Buchet Dossier de Documentation Archéologique, 17.   CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques) Éditions, 1994. Antiquity , 68., 260 (September 1994):  Pages 97 - 109.
Year of Publication: 1994.

49. Record Number: 5098
Author(s): Dabrowska, Elzbieta.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Crosse de l'Abbesse Florence et la sépulture des abbesses du XIe au XIIIe siècle
Source: Les Religieuses dans le Cloître et dans le Monde des Origines à Nos Jours. Actes du Deuxième Colloque International de C.E.R.C.O.R. Poitiers, 29 septembre-2 octobre 1988. .   Publications de l'Université de Sainte-Etienne, 1994. Antiquity , 68., 260 (September 1994):  Pages 111 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1994.

50. Record Number: 29956
Author(s): Michaud, Francine
Contributor(s):
Title : Liaisons Particulières? Franciscains et Testatrices a Marseille (1248 - 1320)
Source: Annales du Midi , 104., (janvier - mars) 197 ( 1992):  Pages 7 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1992.

51. Record Number: 6838
Author(s): Grauer, A. L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Life Patterns of Women from Medieval York [The author examined skeletal remains from a poor parish in medieval York to learn more about the demography, health, and life expectancies of women. The author found more women than men in the cemetery and that more women than men died between the ages of 25 and 35. Because women's skeletons showed fewer signs of stressors, the author theorizes that women were less able than men to fight off serious diseases or injuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Archaeology of Gender: Proceedings of the Twenty-Second Annual Conference of the Archaeological Association of the University of Calgary.   Edited by Dale Walde and Noreen D. Willows .   University of Calgary Archaeology Association, 1991. Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):  Pages 407 - 413.
Year of Publication: 1991.

52. Record Number: 10727
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: The Eleanor Crosses and Royal Burial Customs [The author shows that Edward I’s decisions regarding Eleanor’s remains drew on a number of funerary practices that had developed in France and England during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Annales du Midi , 104., (janvier - mars) 197 ( 1992):  Pages 9 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1991.

53. Record Number: 10681
Author(s): Sharpe, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Date of Saint Mildreth's Translation from Minster-in-Thanet to Canterbury [According to Goscelin's account of the life of Saint Mildreth, the saint's remains were moved to Saint Augustine's Abbey in Canterbury on 18 May 1030. The author maintains that Goscelin's dating is correct even though other historians dispute his chronology (the write apparently names the wrong pope and wrong emperor in his account of the saint's life). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):  Pages 349 - 354.
Year of Publication: 1991.

54. Record Number: 28757
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Entombment
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):
Year of Publication:

55. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Belt Plaques, erroneously attributed to Queen Aregonde
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):
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56. Record Number: 31184
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Panel from the Humility Polyptych - The translation of the body of Humility on 6 June 1311
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):
Year of Publication:

57. Record Number: 31216
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Sarcophagus of Doña Berenguela (or Berengaria)
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):
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58. Record Number: 33714
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Shield-shaped pendant
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):
Year of Publication:

59. Record Number: 36983
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Pellote of Leonor, Queen of Castile
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):
Year of Publication:

60. Record Number: 38351
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Oseberg Ship Burial
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):
Year of Publication: