Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


123 Record(s) Found in our database

SEE ALSO: literacy

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1. Record Number: 28920
Author(s): Clanchy, Michael,
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Mothers Teach their Children to Read?
Source: Motherhood, Religion, and Society in Medieval Europe, 400-1400: Essays Presented to Henrietta Leyser.   Edited by Conrad Leyser and Lesley Smith. Church, Faith and Culture in the Medieval West .   Ashgate, 2011.  Pages 129 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2011.

2. Record Number: 20336
Author(s): Bertini Malgiarini, Patrizia and Ugo Vignuzzi
Contributor(s):
Title : Matilde a Helfta, Melchiade in Umbria (e oltre): un antico volgarizzamento umbro del "Liber specialis gratiae" [Mechthild von Hackeborn's "Liber specialis gratiae" was translated into Italian in the 15th or 16th century. It probably was made for nuns. The translation renames Mechthild "Melchiadis," as do other non-German versions. The appendix provides a compariso
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006.  Pages 291 - 307.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 14649
Author(s): Rando, Daniela.
Contributor(s):
Title : Libri e letture per la vita eremetica: un esempio al femminile dal Veneto [Pious women from Venice occasionally became hermits near Treviso. We can trace some of their reading through the will of Caterina Centania, who founded the Hieronymites of Santa Maria della Rocca and left books to the prior of a monastery near Treviso. Included among these vernacular works of piety are texts in Italian, including in the regional dialect. Some are translations of well-known devotional texts, including pious poetry and Marian texts. The article appendix presents the will of Caterina Centania (1467). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chiesa, vita religiosa, societa nel Medioevo italiano: Studi offerti a Giuseppina De Sandre Gasparini.   Edited by Mariaclara Rossi and Gian Maria Varanini .   Herder, 2005.  Pages 539 - 553.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 10826
Author(s): Simons, Walter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Staining the Speech of Things Divine: The Uses of Literacy in Medieval Beguine Communities [The author examines different kinds of evidence including vernacular texts written by Beguines, wills that bequeathed manuscripts to or from Beguines, and daily activities of Beguines involving the written word. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004.  Pages 85 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 10827
Author(s): Hemptinne, Thérèse.de
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading, Writing, and Devotional Practices: Lay and Religious Women and the Written Word in the Low Countries (1350-1550) [The author argues in part that manuscripts in the vernacular served as a means of connection among female relatives and friends, both urban laywomen and those in religious life (Beguines as well as nuns). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004.  Pages 111 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 10829
Author(s): Heene, Katrien.
Contributor(s):
Title : De litterali et morali earum instruccione: Women's Literacy in Thirteenth-Century Latin Agogic Texts [The author examines didactic texts, particularly saints' lives and exempla, to find out what their clerical authors thought about the connections between women and literacy. Generally reading is associated for women with prayer, while for men it leads to more active engagements in the world, whether it be preaching or directing a noble household. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004.  Pages 145 - 166.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 10854
Author(s): Simon, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Reading Women: Double-Mirroring the "Dame" in "Der Ritter vom Turn"
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.  Pages 175 - 192.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 10130
Author(s): Edwards, A. S. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fifteenth-Century English Collections of Female Saints' Lives [The author examines a mid-fifteenth century manuscript (Cambridge University Library MS Add. 4122) which contains two female saints' lives and a treatise on the Virgin Mary. Edwards briefly examines cultural influences (Bokenham, Chaucer, Lydgate, and Capgrave), religious practices (devotion to St. Margaret and the Virgin), and manuscript conventions (small dimensions and copying verse as prose) that contributed to books such as this one that were intended for family audiences. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Yearbook of English Studies , 33., ( 2003):  Pages 131 - 141.
Year of Publication: 2003.

9. Record Number: 11831
Author(s): Aston, Margaret.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lollard Women [The author examines women's involvement in the Lollard movement from three aspects: 1) women's domestic situation ; 2) women's opportunities for reading and teaching ; 3) the church and religious ritual in terms of women's roles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Yearbook of English Studies , 33., ( 2003):  Pages 166 - 185.
Year of Publication: 2003.

10. Record Number: 10783
Author(s): Jones, Leslie C. and Jonathan J. G. Alexander
Contributor(s):
Title : The Annunciation to the Shepherdess [The authors explore the representation of shepherdesses in fifteenth century deluxe books of hours. There are a variety of types including eroticized figures, pious saint-like young women, and disorderly peasant dancers. The authors suggest that in many cases differences in social class are being emphasized for noble owners (both male and female) of these books of hours. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 165 - 198.
Year of Publication: 2003.

11. Record Number: 8066
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Powers of Record, Powers of Example: Hagiography and Women's History [The author compares an Anglo-Norman hagiography collection from Campsey with the "Ancrene Wisse" and its associated "Katherine Group." While the "Ancrene Wisse" presents hagiography as romance, the Campsey manuscript presents many role models for women in which they act together in groups and inhabit an historical setting. The author argues that the collection represents a collectivity of noble women's interests in the areas of monasticism, ecclesiastic issues, and family. It is centered on East Anglia but has networks of connections running through England and the continent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 71 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2003.

12. Record Number: 11091
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Savoring "Scienta": The Medieval Anchoress Reads "Ancrene Wisse" [The author explores the reading experience that the "Ancrene Wisse" afforded the anchoress. Though intended as a guide book, it also encouraged the devout reader to experience Christ's life and thus transcend the limits of the anchorhold. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 113 - 144.
Year of Publication: 2003.

13. Record Number: 9637
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : This Living Hand: Thirteenth-Century Female Literacy, Materialist Immanence, and the Reader of the "Ancrene Wisse" [The author first surveys the manuscripts of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the languages that early readers would have used. Then she analyzes the broadly historical context of thirteenth century female religious readers. In the final section, Robertson focuses
Source: Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 1 - 36. Abridged version published in Medieval Literature: Criticism and Debates. Edited by Holly A. Crocker and D. Vance Smith. Routledge, 2014. Pages 162-179.
Year of Publication: 2003.

14. Record Number: 11826
Author(s): Leyser, Henrietta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Word of God [The author briefly traces women's use of books from an eighth century Anglo-Saxon copy of the Pauline Epistles that has Ada's name inscribed to late medieval books of hours with illustrations of their female owners. At the same time Leyser reflects on affective piety and women's spirituality, particularly in connection with the book as metaphor for the Christian life as well as for the salvation offered by Christ. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 32 - 45.
Year of Publication: 2003.

15. Record Number: 11092
Author(s): Innes-Parker, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Legacy of "Ancrene Wisse ": Translations, Adaptations, Influences, and Audience, with Special Attention to Women Readers [The author traces the adaptations and echoes of the "Ancrene Wisse" in fourteenth and fifteenth century vernacular devotional literature. In looking at manuscript ownership and wills, Innes-Parker finds circles of reading among religious and lay women. Surprisingly the most innovative texts quickly found their way into women's possession. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 145 - 173.
Year of Publication: 2003.

16. Record Number: 11052
Author(s): Marshall, Simone Celine.
Contributor(s):
Title : An Abstracte Owte of a Boke That is Callid Formula Nouiciorum [the author presents an edition of a Middle English translation of Part One of a Latin devotional work known as "De exterioris et interioris hominis compositione." Marshall argues that the translators' audience was probably female, though it is not clear whether it was for religious or lay women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 29., 40241 (September-December 2003):  Pages 70 - 139.
Year of Publication: 2003.

17. Record Number: 11090
Author(s): Edwards, A. S. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Middle English Manuscripts and Early Readers of "Ancrene Wisse" [The author describes nine surviving manuscripts which include Middle English versions of the "Ancrene Wisse." Edwards also notes the marginal comments made by sixteenth and seventeenth century churchmen and antiquarians. Title not supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Mystics Quarterly , 29., 40241 (September-December 2003):  Pages 103 - 112.
Year of Publication: 2003.

18. Record Number: 7135
Author(s): Wogan-Brown, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Analytical Survey 5: "Reading is Good Prayer": Recent Research on Female Reading Communities [The author has written an extended bibliographic essay that thoughtfully surveys and evaluates the recent historiography on women readers, their texts, and their communities, especially monastic houses. Note also the valuable bibliography on pages 276-297.].
Source: New Medieval Literatures , 5., ( 2002):  Pages 229 - 297.
Year of Publication: 2002.

19. Record Number: 7251
Author(s): Guest, Gerald B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Picturing Women in the First "Bible moralisée" ["It is the goal of this article to extend the work of Chapman and Lowden through an examination of the iconography of women in what is likely the first "Bible moralisée," Ö.N.B. 2554. Beyond this, I wish to consider how a "Bible moralisée" might have been read by a royal woman in the first half of the thirteenth century and what this might tell us about the manuscripts as artistic projects." Page 108].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002. New Medieval Literatures , 5., ( 2002):  Pages 106 - 130.
Year of Publication: 2002.

20. Record Number: 8592
Author(s): Tokunaga, Satoko.
Contributor(s):
Title : Assessing Book Use by Women in Late Medieval England [The author surveys the difficulties in establishing actual use of books by women. Topics briefly discussed include marks of ownership, instances of women writing, communal reading, and the roles of men, particularly as chaplains, as readers, and as interpreters of Latin texts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 5., ( 2002):  Pages 169 - 176.
Year of Publication: 2002.

21. Record Number: 7442
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Maternal Performance of the Virgin Mary in the Old English "Advent"
Source: NWSA Journal , 14., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 38 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2002.

22. Record Number: 6229
Author(s): Simon, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading, Reading Women: Double-Mirroring the Dame in the German Book of the Knight of the Tower (1493)
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002. NWSA Journal , 14., 2 (Summer 2002):
Year of Publication: 2002.

23. Record Number: 6718
Author(s): Powell, Morgan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Speculum virginum and the Audio-Visual Poetics of Women's Religious Instruction
Source: Listen, Daughter: The "Speculum virginum" and the Formation of Religious Women in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Constant J. Mews .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. NWSA Journal , 14., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 59 - 83.
Year of Publication: 2001.

24. Record Number: 6728
Author(s): Akel, Catherine S.
Contributor(s):
Title : ...A Schort Tretys and a Comfortybl...: Perception and Purpose of Margery Kempe's Narrative [the article explores the authors and texts that influenced Margery Kempe; she did not copy Nicholas Love, Richard Rolle, Walter Hilton, or St. Bridget, instead she internalized their ideas and adapted them to her particular needs].
Source: English Studies , 82., 1 (February 2001):  Pages 1 - 13.
Year of Publication: 2001.

25. Record Number: 6839
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Popular Literacy in the Middle Ages: "The Book of Margery Kempe" [The author argues that Margery Kempe demonstrates a text-based literacy in her text because she has a wide knowledge of religious writings, many from heart, that she learned by listening. Margery Kempe expands our definition of literate because of her sophisticated composition and use of written sources. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Popular Literacy: Studies in Cultural Practices and Poetics.   Edited by John Trimbur .   University of Pittsburgh Press, 2001. English Studies , 82., 1 (February 2001):  Pages 56
Year of Publication: 2001.

26. Record Number: 8956
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Circulation of Books [The author argues that patronage has been regarded as the dominant, if not exclusive, means by which people acquired books at the French court. However, there were other ways that women were more likely to have books including inheritance, wedding presents, and New Year's Day gifts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 9 - 31. Issue Title: Women and Book Culture in Late Medieval and Early Modern France
Year of Publication: 2001.

27. Record Number: 6084
Author(s): Laity, K. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : False Positives: The "Katherine Group" Saints as Ambiguous Role Models [The author argues that the writer of the saints' lives in the "Katherine Group" emphasized torture and physical pain in order to instill fear in the young religious women who made up the text's audience].
Source: Magistra , 7., 2 (Winter 2001):  Pages 64 - 99.
Year of Publication: 2001.

28. Record Number: 6927
Author(s): Dronzek, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Theories of Education in Fifteenth-Century Conduct Books [The author compares texts written for boys and girls and argues that medieval ideas about gender affected both content and teaching methods. Boys learned visually, could handle abstract ideas, and did not need examples of violence to ensure obedience, while girls learned by listening, could only understand the concrete, and had to be threatened with corporal punishment regularly to preserve their sexual purity and by extension the family's honor. The texts the author analyzes are: For girls: "The Good Wife Taught Her Daughter" "The Good Wyfe Wold a Pylgremage" "The Book of the Knight of the Tower" For boys: "The Babees Book" "Lerne or Be Lewde" "The ABC of Aristotle" "Urbanitatis" "The Lytylle Childrenes Lytil Boke" "The Young Children's Book" "Stans puer ad mensam" "How the Wise Man Taught His Son" "The Boke of Curtasye" "Symon's Lesson of Wysedome for All Maner Chyldryn." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Magistra , 7., 2 (Winter 2001):  Pages 135 - 159.
Year of Publication: 2001.

29. Record Number: 8958
Author(s): Cerquiglini-Toulet, Jacqueline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and the Book: Programs and Modes of Reading, Strategies for Publication [The author explores the associations Christine makes with books, reading, and writing in her texts. For Christine writing ensures her immortality and makes a connection with her father. She is concerned that her entire body of work be read in the future and knows that multiple copies must be made to help ensure survival. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 112 - 126. Issue Title: Women and Book Culture in Late Medieval and Early Modern France
Year of Publication: 2001.

30. Record Number: 8957
Author(s): Legaré, Anne-Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Charlotte de Savoie's Library and Illuminators [The author argues that Queen Charlotte took much interest in her books. She was particularly occupied with devotional literature and with giving needed books to her family members. The Appendix presents excerpts from documents relating to her library and a list of manuscripts belonging to her husband, Louis XI, that were included in the inventory of Charlotte's property. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 32 - 67. Issue Title: Women and Book Culture in Late Medieval and Early Modern France
Year of Publication: 2001.

31. Record Number: 6925
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Miroir des bonnes Femmes": Not for Women Only? ["To read the 'Miroir des bonnes femmes' as relating only to women, therefore, would be to misunderstand its role in the formation of new ideologies during the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries. The conjunction of female-based rhetoric, familial identities, and the promise of social advancement through proper conduct marks the first stage of a distinctive bourgeois ideology that will be fully articulated and culturally dominant by the late eighteenth and nineteenth centuries. Despite the assumption, perhaps, on the part of conduct book owners that they are justifying a claim to 'noble' rank, it is in bourgeois culture that female honor is made the symbolic basis of a family's social reputation. As they cultivated that reputation and fostered a process of social advancement, fathers as well as their daughters therefore had a vital interest in owning conduct texts addressed to women." p. 102].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 86 - 105.
Year of Publication: 2001.

32. Record Number: 8549
Author(s): Amsler, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affective Literacy: Gestures of Reading in the Later Middle Ages [The author uses "affective literacy" to mean the ways people develop emotional, gestural, and other physical relationships with texts. He argues that the "Ancrene Wisse" regulated its readers' devotional, physical, and affective behaviors. Transgressive literacy, in which readers touched or kissed images, gave them a relationship with sacred texts which came close to that of clerics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies: Proceeding of the Illinois Medieval Association (Full Text via Project Muse) 18 (2001): 83-110 Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

33. Record Number: 4876
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Obstetrical and Gynecological Texts in Middle English [The author complies a list of Middle English manuscripts that contain different texts on childbirth, women’s health, sexuality, and cosmetics. Some of the manuscripts also contain medicinal and culinary recipes. Many of the medical complications are attributed to the female healer Trota (or Trotula) of Salerno, but others are attributed to male authors like Galen and Hippocrates. Although the Trotula texts were popular in late medieval England, the manuscripts indicate that the most widely disseminated medical text was “The Sekeness of Wymmen” by Gilbertus Anglicus. The textual and codicological evidence of these manuscripts suggests that both men and women (and both physicians and laypersons) possessed and read these texts. The author describes each manuscript and lists its contents, and the appendix transcribes a new manuscript (the Middle English "Nature of Wommen") that has never been described. Originally published in Studies in the Age of Chaucer 14 (1992): 53-88. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: 2000. Originally published in Studies in the Age of Chaucer 14 (1992): 53-88.
Year of Publication: 2000.

34. Record Number: 4878
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Possibilities of Literacy and the Limits of Reading: Women and the Gendering of Medical Literacy
Source: Women's Healthcare in the Medieval West: Texts and Contexts.   Edited by Monica H. Green Variorum Collected Studies Series, 680.   Ashgate Publishing, 2000.  Pages 1 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2000.

35. Record Number: 5460
Author(s): McGovern-Mouron, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Listen to Me, Daughter, Listen to a Faithful Counsel: The "Liber de modo bene vivendi ad sororem" [The author argues that the "Liber" and its translation are indications of the concern that some monks felt for the spiritual welfare of nuns; the Appendix lists the chapter headings of the "Liber de modo bene vivendi ad sororem"].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 81 - 106.
Year of Publication: 2000.

36. Record Number: 5462
Author(s): Boklund-Lagopoulou, Karin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Yate of Heven: Conceptions of the Female Body in the Religious Lyrics [The author explores a variety of images including Jesus as nourishing mother, the soul as the bride of Christ, the body as the site of decay and corruption, and the closed, virginal body].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 133 - 154.
Year of Publication: 2000.

37. Record Number: 4499
Author(s): Everhart, Deborah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anna Komnene, Learned Women, and the Book in Byzantine Art [The author examines the representation of women in art with books or scrolls and argues that it was probably influenced by the female members of the imperial family who valued and promoted learning].
Source: Anna Komnene and Her Times.   Edited by Thalia Gouma-Peterson .   Garland Publishing, 2000.  Pages 125 - 156.
Year of Publication: 2000.

38. Record Number: 4803
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Many Grete Myraclys...in Divers Contreys of the Eest: The Reading and Circulation of the Middle English prose "Three Kings of Cologne" [The author argues that the "Three Kings" may have had a special appeal for women because it frequently appears in manuscript collections with devotional works specifically addressed to women].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000.  Pages 35 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2000.

39. Record Number: 5459
Author(s): Selman, Rebecca.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spirituality and Sex Change: "Horologium sapientiae" and "Speculum devotorum" [The author argues that the "Speculum devotorum" was written for women; the intended readers, possibly Bridgettine nuns, were presented with the figures of Mary and Bridget as models].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 63 - 79.
Year of Publication: 2000.

40. Record Number: 4883
Author(s): Cornish, Alison.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Lady Asks: The Gender of Vulgarization in Late Medieval Italy
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (Full Text via JSTOR) 115, 2 (March 2000): 166-180. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2000.

41. Record Number: 5454
Author(s): Salamone, Nadia Cannata.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Making of the Italian Literary Canon [The author explores women's roles as the audience for literature in the vernacular written in courtly circles].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000.  Pages 498 - 512.
Year of Publication: 2000.

42. Record Number: 5531
Author(s): De Courcelles, Dominique.
Contributor(s):
Title : Recherches sur les livres et les femmes en Catalogne aux XVe et XVIe siècles [the author briefly considers the literary debate about woman's nature, the roles which women played in the creation of literary works as authors, dedicatees, and commissioners, and the kinds of books found in women's libraries; in briefly considering women's literary circles, the author mentions the noble woman Isabel Suaris who promoted courtly literature and Abbess Isabel de Villena whose convent was a center of literary activity].
Source: Des Femmes et des Livres: France et Espagnes, XIVe-XVIIe siècle. Actes de la journée d'étude organisée par l'École nationale des chartes et l'École normale supérieure de Fontenay/Saint-Cloud (Paris, 30 avril 1998).   Edited by Dominique de Courcelles and Carmen Val Julián .   Études et Rencontres de l'École des Chartes, 4. École des Chartes, 1999.  Pages 95 - 114.
Year of Publication: 1999.

43. Record Number: 5530
Author(s): Zimmermann, Margarete.
Contributor(s):
Title : Querelle des femmes, querelles du livre [The author provides a brief overview of the controversies over women's abilities and prerogatives, known as the "Querelle des femmes;" she also considers how modern scholars have labelled and discussed it].
Source: Des Femmes et des livres: France et Espagnes, XIVe-XVIIe siècle. Actes de la journée d'étude organisée par l'École nationale des chartes et l'École normale supérieure de Fontenay/Saint-Cloud (Paris, 30 avril 1998).   Edited by Dominique de Courcelles and Carmen Val Julián .   Études et Rencontres de l'École des Chartes, 4. École des Chartes, 1999.  Pages 79 - 94.
Year of Publication: 1999.

44. Record Number: 3541
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Beguine Textuality: Sacred Performances [The author argues that the Beguine texts should be read as theatrical works].
Source: Performance and Transformation: New Approaches to Late Medieval Spirituality.   Edited by Mary A. Suydam and Joanna E. Ziegler .   St. Martin's Press, 1999.  Pages 169 - 210.
Year of Publication: 1999.

45. Record Number: 4329
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Changing Views of Carolingian Women's Literary Culture: The Evidence From Essen [the Appendix provides a detailed listing of the contents of Düsseldorf, Landes- und Universitätsbibliothek Sammelhandschrift B.3].
Source: Early Medieval Europe , 8., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 69 - 97.
Year of Publication: 1999.

46. Record Number: 4380
Author(s): Woods, Marjorie Curry.
Contributor(s):
Title : Shared Books: Primers, Psalters, and the Adult Acquisition of Literacy Among Devout Laywomen and Women in Orders in Late Medieval England
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999. Early Medieval Europe , 8., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 177 - 193.
Year of Publication: 1999.

47. Record Number: 4310
Author(s): Grise, C. Annette.
Contributor(s):
Title : In the Blessid Vyneyerd of Oure Holy Saueour : Female Religious Readers and Textual Reception in the "Myroure of Oure Ladye" and the "Orcherd of Syon" [The author argues that the two devotional works that come from Syon emphasized the ideal reader, whether lay or religious, as someone who was as meek, obedient, submissive, and devout as a nun from Syon].
Source: The Medieval Mystical Tradition England, Ireland, and Wales. Exeter Symposium VI. Papers read at Charney Manor, July 1999.   Edited by Marion Glasscoe .   D. S. Brewer, 1999. Early Medieval Europe , 8., 1 ( 1999):  Pages 380 - 381.
Year of Publication: 1999.

48. Record Number: 5476
Author(s): Gajano, Sofia Boesch, Prosperi, Adriano and Albano Biondi
Contributor(s):
Title : La Donna e il libro [the three authors react to the studies edited by Gabriella Zarri in "Donna, Disciplina, creanza cristiana" (Edizioni di storia e letteratura, 1996); among the findings is a repertory of 2,626 titles for women published in the fifteenth through the seventeenth centuries in Italy; most provide women with models of conduct, legal rules of life, and norms for behavior; the literature on conduct emphasized obedience; women played significant roles in this development as authors, especially of autobiographies, buyers of books, and readers].
Source: Quaderni storici , 1 (Aprile 1998):  Pages 227 - 242.
Year of Publication: 1998.

49. Record Number: 3359
Author(s): Purdie, Rhiannon
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexing the Manuscript: The Case for Female Ownership of MS Chetham 8009
Source: Neophilologus , 82., 1 (January 1998):  Pages 139 - 148.
Year of Publication: 1998.

50. Record Number: 5435
Author(s): Bishop, Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dame Study and Women's Literacy ["Langland's poem negotiates the discourse of reading, recognizing the competition between the accepted female discursive mode and the call to social activism: 'Piers Plowman' embodies that competition in the figure of Study. As wife of Wit, Study dramatizes the competition for a reader's conscience, and traces in her disquisition the readerly paths to the heart. The one thing that recuperates the social experience of reading is its communal and sensual component: texts are read, heard, and felt. Study's emphasis on charity reveals a bold, feminized component of the discourse of social activism as antidote, if you will, to the constructed female reader of texts of affective piety." (Page 112)].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 97 - 115.
Year of Publication: 1998.

51. Record Number: 5433
Author(s): Baker, Joan and Susan Signe Morrison
Contributor(s):
Title : The Luxury of Gender: "Piers Plowman" and "The Merchant's Tale" ["We do not wish to suggest from our reading of these texts that Langland is indifferent to the gender concern Chaucer delightedly and delightfully explores. On the contrary, we regardLangland's relentless search for Truth throughout his poem as evidence that he would be uneasy at the very least about offering a painless placebo, a quick fix, for the problems of gender. We conclude our study, therefore, with a close look at some differences in the versions of "Piers Plowman" to assert that Langland was, indeed, not only aware of, but deeply concerned with such issues, particularly those concerning a gendered readership of his text. And this, we contend, makes his ultimate subordination of gender to other social and spiritual agendas a more deliberate and hence more compelling argument for the 'luxury' of gender." (Page 52)].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 31 - 63.
Year of Publication: 1998.

52. Record Number: 1595
Author(s): Ehrenschwendtner, Marie-Luise.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Library Collected by and for the Use of Nuns: St. Catherine's Convent, Nuremberg [by the end of the fifteenth century the library had between 500 and 600 books, mostly in German, consisting of spritual literature and texts supporting the reformed Dominican life].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Notes and Queries , 3 (September 1997):  Pages 123 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1997.

53. Record Number: 1977
Author(s): Kempster, Hugh.
Contributor(s):
Title : Julian of Norwich: The Westminster Text of "A Revelation of Love" [includes an edition of the Westminster text with some variant readings from other manuscripts; the author argues that the Westminster editor heavily abridged and adapted the text in order to simplify the technical intricacies of julian's mystical theology because the manuscript was destined for a lay audience].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 23., 4 (December 1997):  Pages 177 - 209.
Year of Publication: 1997.

54. Record Number: 2267
Author(s): Ehrenschwendtner, Marie Luise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Puellae litteratae: The Use of the Vernacular in the Dominican Convents of Southern Germany
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997. Mystics Quarterly , 23., 4 (December 1997):  Pages 49 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1997.

55. Record Number: 5598
Author(s): Stofferahn, Steven A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Twenty-Fourth Saint Louis Conference on Manuscript Studies: Abstracts of Papers, Friday, 10 October 1997, Session II--Women of the Book: Düsseldorf, Landes-und Universitätsbibliothek Sammelhandschrift B. 3 and Its Place in Carolingian Literary Culture
Source: Manuscripta , 41., 3 (November 1997):  Pages 136 - 137.
Year of Publication: 1997.

56. Record Number: 2480
Author(s): Black, Nancy B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman as Savior: The Virgin Mary and the Empress of Rome in Gautier de Coinci's "Miracles" [analysis of the thirteenth century text and its manuscript illustrations, emphasizing the chastity and spiritual authority of the empress; Gautier addressed his text to the abbess of Notre Dame at Soissons and the abbess of Fontevrault].
Source: Romanic Review , 88., 4 (November 1997):  Pages 503 - 517.
Year of Publication: 1997.

57. Record Number: 2640
Author(s): Keller, Kimberly.
Contributor(s):
Title : Prudence's Pedagogy of the Oppressed [Prudence persuades her husband Melibee to take her advice through the use of scholastic arguments and learned citations; she changes the balance of power and sets an example for her female readers].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 98., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 415 - 426.
Year of Publication: 1997.

58. Record Number: 2270
Author(s): Chewning, Susannah Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mysticism and the Anchoritic Community: "A Time... of Veiled Infinity" [suggests that the author's persona presented in the "Wohunge" is feminine and that mystical texts are acts of feminine writing irrespective of the sex of the author].
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 98., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 116 - 137.
Year of Publication: 1997.

59. Record Number: 1592
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Mirrors of a Collective Past: Re-considering Images of Medieval Women [looks at the visual evidence provided by manuscript illuminations and paintings for women readers and women workers including bath attendants and midwives].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 98., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 75 - 93.
Year of Publication: 1997.

60. Record Number: 1598
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Fables for the Court: Illustrations of Marie de France's "Fables" in Paris BN, MS Arsenal 3142 [the manuscript was dedicated to Marie of Brabant, wife of King Philippe of France, and reflects the roles of reading and manuscripts at the French Court].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 98., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 190 - 203.
Year of Publication: 1997.

61. Record Number: 5597
Author(s): Purdie, Rhiannon
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexing the Manuscript: The Case for Female Ownership of MS Chetham 8009 [The author argues that the manuscript was completed by or for a woman based on the selection of the fourteen texts included; the saints' lives, prayers, and romances all demonstrate a pronounced interest in female characters and women's concerns; the cou
Source: Manuscripta , 41., 1 (March 1997):  Pages 53 - 63.
Year of Publication: 1997.

62. Record Number: 2455
Author(s): Fisher, Rod.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Singer's Confrontation with Beauty: Some Observations on the Performance of Morungen's Songs [The author analyzes Morungen's songs for evidence of gestures, movements, and interactions with the audience, particularly the beloved lady addressed in the poems].
Source: German Life and Letters , 50., 3 (July 1997):  Pages 267 - 282.
Year of Publication: 1997.

63. Record Number: 1596
Author(s): Gameson, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Gospels of Margaret of Scotland and the Literacy of an Eleventh-Century Queen [appendices include a trancription of the Latin text on the flyleaf that describes the miraculous survival of the manuscript after falling in a river, an English translation of the text, and variant readings in the gospel texts].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. German Life and Letters , 50., 3 (July 1997):  Pages 148 - 171.
Year of Publication: 1997.

64. Record Number: 1969
Author(s): Tobin, Frank.
Contributor(s):
Title : Audience, Authorship, and Authority in Mechthild von Magdeburg's "Flowing Light of the Godhead" [argues that her primary audience was religious (clergy and male and female monastics) and that her shared authorship (both God and Mechthild, an unlettered Beguine, were resposible) required a variety of strategies to assert the authority of her text].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 23., 1 (March 1997):  Pages 8 - 17.
Year of Publication: 1997.

65. Record Number: 1869
Author(s): Muir Wright, Rosemary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Great Whore in the Illustrated Apocalypse Cycles [traces the development of the image of the Whore of Babylon and discusses the impact that aristocratic female readers had on her representation in manuscripts both as the sovereign lady and as the evil other].
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 23., 3 (September 1997):  Pages 191 - 210.
Year of Publication: 1997.

66. Record Number: 2416
Author(s): Townsend, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ironic Intertextuality and the Reader's Resistance to Heroic Masculinity in the "Waltharius" [suggests that monastic readers viewed Hildegund as a subversive character who undercut the warriors' bravado; comparisons are made with the "Aeneid's" Dido episode and slasher films].
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Journal of Medieval History , 23., 3 (September 1997):  Pages 67 - 86.
Year of Publication: 1997.

67. Record Number: 2070
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Books for Nuns: Cambridge University Library MS Additional 3042 [the manuscript contains twenty texts including liturgical pieces, private prayers, mystical treatises, and didactic works ; the article concludes with editions of the two texts: "Form of Confession for a Female Augustinian" and "English Version of De Triplici Via"].
Source: Notes and Queries , 3 (September 1997):  Pages 310 - 319.
Year of Publication: 1997.

68. Record Number: 1601
Author(s): Penketh, Sandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Books of Hours [discusses women's use and reading of books of hours ; suggests that many of the illustrations were intended to extol such virtues as obedience, humility, and purity ; and analyzes some female owner portraits].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Notes and Queries , 3 (September 1997):  Pages 266 - 281.
Year of Publication: 1997.

69. Record Number: 9507
Author(s): Klein, Stacy S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Aelfric's Sources and His Gendered Audiences [Aelfric's "Life" of Judith was intended for two different audiences: nuns who needed encouragement toward chastity and the noble man Sigeweard and his warriors who were fighting the Vikings. Aelfric's message about chastity could profit warriors because uncontrolled sexual desire would lead men to dishonor. Klein argues that Aelfric's narrative reflects his anxieties both about female sexuality and men's sexual desires. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 13., ( 1996):  Pages 111 - 119.
Year of Publication: 1996.

70. Record Number: 1852
Author(s): Kay, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Holy Mary Intervenes for the Clergy in the "Cantigas" of Alfonso X and in the "Milagros" of Berceo: Observations Concerning the Implicit Audience
Source: Bulletin of the Cantigueiros de Santa Maria , 8., (Spring 1996):  Pages 3 - 13.
Year of Publication: 1996.

71. Record Number: 1220
Author(s): Suydam, Mary A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Writing Beguines: Ecstatic Performances [argues for a "performance art" approach to Beguine visionary writings with an emphasis on the multiple audiences involved and physicality].
Source: Magistra , 2., 1 (Summer 1996):  Pages 137 - 169.
Year of Publication: 1996.

72. Record Number: 1626
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading the Dirty Bits [discusses the kinds of evidence available for the practice of finding sexual pleasure in a literary text ; also considers the ways in which modern literary criticism has addressed this habit of erotic reading].
Source: Desire and Discipline: Sex and Sexuality in the Premodern West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray and Konrad Eisenbichler .   University of Toronto Press, 1996. Magistra , 2., 1 (Summer 1996):  Pages 280 - 295.
Year of Publication: 1996.

73. Record Number: 2337
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Aelfric's Sources and His Gendered Audiences
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

74. Record Number: 1584
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Don't Ask, Don't Tell: The Wife of Bath and Vernacular Translations [the Wife of Bath's "Prologue" amd "Tale" promote the status of the vernacular and acknowledge the role female audiences play in the translations of "authoritative" texts like Trotula].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 97 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1996.

75. Record Number: 2135
Author(s): Rapp, Claudia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Figures of Female Sanctity: Byzantine Edifying Manuscripts and Their Audience [analysis of six manuscript collections of women saints' lives; the author argues that the intended audience was not always exclusively female and, furthermore, that women hagiographers and patrons did not always favor female saints].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 50 (1996): 313-344. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

76. Record Number: 3682
Author(s): Hanna, Ralph, III
Contributor(s):
Title : Some NorFolk Women and Their Books, ca. 1390-1440 [the author explores two pair of women involved in literature culture: Margery Baxter and Avis Mone, two peasant women who were Lollards, and Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich; the author argues that all four women were dependent on male clerics or teachers to translate and read texts to them and that women's attempts to fulfill themselves through the written word were very difficult].
Source: The Cultural Patronage of Medieval Women.   Edited by June Hall McCash .   University of Georgia Press, 1996.  Pages 288 - 305.
Year of Publication: 1996.

77. Record Number: 1608
Author(s): Kottenhoff, Margarete.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Miniaturen des "Livre de la Cité des Dames" als historiche Quellen
Source: Historisches Jahrbuch , 115., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 335 - 361.
Year of Publication: 1995.

78. Record Number: 1988
Author(s): Tipton, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Toads on the Text: The Spirituality of Psalter Reading in the "Life of Christina of Markyate"
Source: Proceedings of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 3., ( 1995):  Pages 51 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1995.

79. Record Number: 6015
Author(s): Rossi, Luciano.
Contributor(s):
Title : La donna nella novelistica del Quattrocento: Sercambi e le "Cent nouvelles nouvelles" [one of Boccaccio's imitators was Giovanni Sercambi; many stereotypes about women, most derived from the novelistic tradition, appear in his tales; by the fifteenth century, the novel had become, for reasons of its erotic content, limited to an all-male audience; Sercambi's tales were circulated in such circles, including that of Philip the Good of Burgundy, both in the original Italian and in translation].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995. Proceedings of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 3., ( 1995):  Pages 237 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1995.

80. Record Number: 398
Author(s): McSheffrey, Shannon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Literacy and the Gender Gap in the Late Middle Ages: Women and Reading in Lollard Communities
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Essays in Medieval Studies , 13., ( 1996):  Pages 157 - 170.
Year of Publication: 1995.

81. Record Number: 394
Author(s): Zimmermann, Margarete.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sharpen Your Mind with the Whetstone of Books: The Female Recluse as Reader in Goscelin's "Liber Confortatorius," Aelred of Rievaulx's "De Institutione Inclusarum," and the "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Essays in Medieval Studies , 13., ( 1996):  Pages 113 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1995.

82. Record Number: 377
Author(s): Summit, Jennifer.
Contributor(s):
Title : William Caxton, Margaret Beaufort, and the Romance of Female Patronage ["Blanchardyn and Eglantine" as a sphere of masculine activity].
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Essays in Medieval Studies , 13., ( 1996):  Pages 151 - 165.
Year of Publication: 1995.

83. Record Number: 396
Author(s): Bell, David N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the "Wohunge of Ure Lauerd": The Thirteenth- Century Female Reader and the Lover- Knight
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Essays in Medieval Studies , 13., ( 1996):  Pages 137 - 147.
Year of Publication: 1995.

84. Record Number: 24
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : What the Nuns Read: Literary Evidence from the English Bridgettine House, Syon Abbey
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 57., ( 1995):  Pages 205 - 222.
Year of Publication: 1995.

85. Record Number: 376
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Lydgate's Lyrics and Women Readers
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Mediaeval Studies , 57., ( 1995):  Pages 139 - 149.
Year of Publication: 1995.

86. Record Number: 368
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesca da Rimini and Dante's Women Readers
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Mediaeval Studies , 57., ( 1995):  Pages 71 - 83.
Year of Publication: 1995.

87. Record Number: 364
Author(s): Goodman, Jennifer R.
Contributor(s):
Title : That Wommen Holde in Ful Greet Reverence: Mothers and Daughters Reading Chivalric Romances
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Mediaeval Studies , 57., ( 1995):  Pages 25 - 30.
Year of Publication: 1995.

88. Record Number: 374
Author(s): Arden, Heather.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women as Readers, Women as Text in the "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Mediaeval Studies , 57., ( 1995):  Pages 111 - 117.
Year of Publication: 1995.

89. Record Number: 363
Author(s): Bennett, Philip E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Readers in Froissart: Implied, Fictive, and Other
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Mediaeval Studies , 57., ( 1995):  Pages 13 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1995.

90. Record Number: 104
Author(s): Haywood, Louise M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gradissa: A Fictional Female Reader in/of a Male Author's Text
Source: Medium Aevum , 64., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 85 - 99.
Year of Publication: 1995.

91. Record Number: 399
Author(s): Biller, Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Texts in Languedocian Catharism
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Medium Aevum , 64., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 171 - 182.
Year of Publication: 1995.

92. Record Number: 3514
Author(s): Gill, Katherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Production of Religious Literature in the Vernacular, 1300-1500
Source: Creative Women in Medieval and Early Modern Italy: A Religious and Artistic Renaissance.   Edited by E. Ann Matter and John Coakley .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994. Forum for Modern Language Studies , 30., 2 ( 1994):  Pages 64 - 104.
Year of Publication: 1994.

93. Record Number: 2471
Author(s): Hudson, Vivian Kay.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clothing and Adornment Imagery in "The Scale of Perfection" : A Reflection of Contemplation
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 116 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1994.

94. Record Number: 4333
Author(s): Copeland, Rita.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Women Can't Read: Medieval Hermeneutics, Statutory Law, and the Lollard Heresy Trials
Source: Representing Women: Law, Literature, and Feminism.   Edited by Susan Sage Heinzelman and Zipporah Batshaw Wiseman .   Duke University Press, 1994. Studies in Spirituality , 4., ( 1994):  Pages 253 - 286.
Year of Publication: 1994.

95. Record Number: 1875
Author(s): Solterer, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing, Hearing, Tasting Women: Medieval Senses of Reading [comparison of the woman reader's five senses in the "Bestiaire d'Amour" and the response by an anonymous woman author].
Source: Comparative Literature (Full Text via JSTOR) 46, 2 (Spring 1994): 129-145. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

96. Record Number: 1382
Author(s): Clayton, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Aelfric's "Judith": Manipulative or Manipulated? [argues for multiple audiences for the literal, typological, and tropological levels of the text; by emphasizing Judith's chastity and humility, Aelfric attempts to defuse Judith's power and sexuality in the Biblical narrative]
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 23., ( 1994):  Pages 215 - 227.
Year of Publication: 1994.

97. Record Number: 3621
Author(s): Rapp, Claudia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Models of Female Sainthood: Byzantine Nuns and Their Edifying Manuscripts
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 20., ( 1994):  Pages 10
Year of Publication: 1994.

98. Record Number: 8478
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaste Bodies: Frames and Experiences [The author explores the "Ancrene Wisse," arguing that it embodies an ideology of containment for women in its emphasis on the enclosed, chaste body. At the same time there are slips since the manuscript shows glimpses of a textual community and even of anchoresses living together. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 20., ( 1994):  Pages 24 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1994.

99. Record Number: 1818
Author(s): Matthews, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading the Woman Reading : Culture and Commodity in Chrétien's "Pesme Aventure" Episode [argues that the episode disguises the commodification of the daughter at "Pesme Aventure" by the very romance conventions that she highlights in her reading ; the author also argues against a "realistic" reading of the silkworkers' situation].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 30., 2 ( 1994):  Pages 113 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1994.

100. Record Number: 6245
Author(s): Diamond, Arlyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Revelations and Re-evaluations: Medieval Women [the author argues that the four books under review (Helen Damico and Alexandra Hennessey Olsen, eds., "New Readings on Women in Old English Literature;" Bella Millet and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, eds., "Medieval English Prose for Women: Selections from the 'Katherine Group' and 'Ancrene Wisse;'" Joel T. Rosenthal, ed., "Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History;" and Katharina M. Wilson and Elizabeth M. Makowski, "Wykked Wyves and the Woes of Marriage: Misogamous Literature from Juvenal to Chaucer") demonstrate that the study of women in the Middle Ages has reached a new level of understanding, more nuanced and specific than in the past].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 19., ( 1993):  Pages 147 - 158.
Year of Publication: 1993.

101. Record Number: 9458
Author(s): Bartlett, Anne Clark.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Delicious Matyr”: Feminine Courtesy in Middle English Devotional Literature for Women [The author explores how devotional texts addressed to women readers often used the discourses of courtly literature and romances, while at the same time critiquing these literary conventions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 9 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1992.

102. Record Number: 10005
Author(s): Morse, Charlotte Cook.
Contributor(s):
Title : What to Call Petrarch’s Griselda [The story about Griselda appears in many medieval manuscripts and early printed editions, but each version is unique, with different introductory and concluding rubrics (headings and titles). These rubrics provide insights into the variety of ways early scribes and readers read the story: it could be read as a myth, history, fable, or exemplum. A bibliography lists 188 manuscripts containing Petrarch’s Latin Griselda story. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Uses of manuscripts in literary studies: essays in memory of Judson Boyce Allen.   Edited by Charlotte Cook Morse, Penelope Reed Doob, and Marjorie Curry Woods Studies in medieval culture .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1992. Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 263 - 303.
Year of Publication: 1992.

103. Record Number: 10006
Author(s): Tarvers, Josephine Koster.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Thys ys my mystrys boke”: English Women and Readers and Writers in Late Medieval England [Women actively participated in manuscript culture and literary production in fourteenth and fifteenth century England. Manuscript evidence shows they could be owners of books as well as translators and scribes. The author provides many examples of manuscripts that were written by and for (and circulated among) women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Uses of manuscripts in literary studies: essays in memory of Judson Boyce Allen.   Edited by Charlotte Cook Morse, Penelope Reed Doob, and Marjorie Curry Woods Studies in medieval culture .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1992. Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 305 - 327.
Year of Publication: 1992.

104. Record Number: 10374
Author(s): Beer, Jeanette M. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Stylistic Conventions in "Le Livre de la mutacion de Fortune" [In her allegorical poem, Christine uses rhetorical devices (particularly “dilatio,” “amplificatio,” and “abbreviatio”) in order to construct her relationship with her readers. While she does use some tropes that male poets use, Christine disassociates herself from particular tropes used in Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose” and Guillaume Machaut’s “Livre de Voir-Dit.” The author also argues that Christine is unable to integrate the question of Jewish history into the larger historical vision of the work. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 124 - 136.
Year of Publication: 1992.

105. Record Number: 7246
Author(s): Gertz, SunHee Kim.
Contributor(s):
Title : Transferral, Transformation, and the Act of Reading in Marie deFrance's "Bisclavret" [The author observes that in Marie's "lai" "Bisclavret," the characters who are the most careful readers are also the most convincing storytellers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romance Quarterly , 39., 4 (November 1992):  Pages 399 - 410.
Year of Publication: 1992.

106. Record Number: 9480
Author(s): Johnson, M. K.
Contributor(s):
Title : “No Bananas, Giraffes, or Elephants”: Margery Kempe’s Text of Bliss [The author analyzes the “Book of Margery Kempe” as a “text of bliss,” one which ruptures and upsets our assumptions and breaks apart our reading strategies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Studies , 21., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 185 - 196.
Year of Publication: 1992.

107. Record Number: 11114
Author(s): Brown-Grant, Rosalind.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'Avision Christine: Autobiographical Narrative or Mirror for the Prince? [The author argues that the autobiographical sections of "L'Avision" were intended to show Christine as an exemplar for her princely reader. She was led to a greater understanding of the self and a better relationship with God. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Margaret Brabant .   Westview Press, 1992. Women's Studies , 21., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 95 - 111.
Year of Publication: 1992.

108. Record Number: 10520
Author(s): Casagrande, Carla.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Protected Woman [Writers of didactic and pastoral literature aimed at women classified their intended female audience in various ways (by marital status, age, social status, or family role), but these texts shared many of the same values. They state that since women are weak and inconstant, they cannot be their own guardians and must submit to the authority of men. Instead of living in the public sphere, women should focus on the domestic sphere and discipline themselves. These texts discourage excessive attention to exterior concerns like clothing and cosmetics and instead encourage cultivating the inner virtues of chastity, humility, modesty, sobriety, silence, industriousness, and mercy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Women's Studies , 21., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 70 - 104.
Year of Publication: 1992.

109. Record Number: 11215
Author(s): Winstead, Karen A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Piety, Politics, and Social Commitment in Capgrave’s "Life of St. Katherine" [Capgrave radically changes old conventions of sacred biographies by creating a new saint’s life. Interested in political, historical, and personal frameworks for martyrdom, Capgrave explores the saint’s limitations as a human and examines how her earth-bound social status affects her public involvement in the secular world. This worldly shift in the representation of the female martyr protagonist reflects the poet’s need to appeal to bourgeois women who were the primary audience for saint’s lives and pious tales. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica , 17., ( 1991):  Pages 59 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1991.

110. Record Number: 11794
Author(s): Gaylord, Alan T.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Dorigen to the Vavasour: Reading Backwards [The author discusses the differences between reading the Franklin’s Tale “forwards” and “backwards.” Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Olde Daunce: Love, Friendship, Sex, and Marriage in the Medieval World.   Edited by Robert R. Edwards and Stephen Spector .   State University of New York Press, 1991. Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 177 - 200.
Year of Publication: 1991.

111. Record Number: 16591
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Marguerite Reads Giovanni: Gender and Narration in the "Heptaméron" and the "Decameron" [The article studies the ways in which Marguerite de Navarre rewrites the gender of Boccaccio's narrative voice in her translation, thereby questioning the function of gender in authorship. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance and Reformation/Renaissance et Réforme New Series , 1 ( 1991):  Pages 21 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1991.

112. Record Number: 11193
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and the Misogynistic Tradition [In her poetry, Christine de Pizan refutes the misogynist literary tradition exemplified by such texts as the Roman de la Rose. She confronts misogyny on three fronts: reason, experience, and writing. In her allegorical poems, Lady Reason encourages the author to reconsider common notions about women. The poet’s own experience allows her to give many counter examples to misogynist texts. Most importantly, Christine’s scholarly acts of reading and writing generate numerous examples of feminine virtue from books that previous writers have ignored. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Pages 297-311. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 279 - 292. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Translated by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski and Kevin Brownlee. W. W. Norton & Company, 1997. Pages 297-311.
Year of Publication: 1990.

113. Record Number: 11195
Author(s): de Looze, Laurence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France et la Textualisation: Arbre, Enfant, Oeuvre dans le Lai de "Fresne" [Throughout the poem, Marie de France exploits metaphorical language that connects the process of procreation (the birth of a child through sexual reproduction) and the generation of a text by a writer. The metaphorical correspondence between the labor or “work” of writing and the labor of childbirth informs the language of many French texts written during this time. The anxieties expressed by modern scholars who attempt to use manuscripts to reconstruct a pure and authorial edition of a text thus reflect medieval writers’ own anxieties about the legitimacy of sexual and textual reproduction. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 4 ( 1990):  Pages 396 - 408.
Year of Publication: 1990.

114. Record Number: 12735
Author(s): Garland, Lynda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Be Amorous, But Be Chaste…’: Sexual morality in Byzantine learned and vernacular romance [Aristocratic Byzantine readers enjoyed romances, which often derived tales of love and adventure from Hellenstic or ancient Greek influences and traditions. From the twelfth century onwards, authors of romances in Greek often borrowed themes from ancient pagan texts including the idea of passionate erotic love, yet unlike Classical authors, Byzantine writers strictly presented marriage as the ultimate goal to which all characters strive. Despite threats to their chastity, these romances featured heroes and heroines who remain chaste until the wedding ceremony that ends the story. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 14., ( 1990):  Pages 62 - 120.
Year of Publication: 1990.

115. Record Number: 12767
Author(s): Millet, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Audience of the Saints’ Lives of the Katherine Group [The author posits that the Katherine Group had two “concentric” audiences, one composed of anchoresses, and the other, a general audience, directly addressed by the text, who may have received the Lives orally, in church. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reading Medieval Studies , 16., ( 1990):  Pages 127 - 156.
Year of Publication: 1990.

116. Record Number: 15607
Author(s): Schulenburg, Jane Tibbetts.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saints' Lives as a Source for the History of Women, 500-1100 The author argues that saints' lives are still a relatively underutilized source for the early Middle Ages generally and for women's history in particular. The lives convey social values, collective mentalities, and much indirect information on women's experience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History.   Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal .   University of Georgia Press, 1990. Reading Medieval Studies , 16., ( 1990):  Pages 285 - 320.
Year of Publication: 1990.

117. Record Number: 28821
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Holy Kinship
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/0/0b/Meister_des_Ortenberger_Altars_001.jpg/250px-Meister_des_Ortenberger_Altars_001.jpg
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118. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Tomb of Doña Maria Vilalobos
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d9/LisbonCathedral-Tomb3.jpg/250px-LisbonCathedral-Tomb3.jpg
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119. Record Number: 30947
Author(s):
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Title : Eleanor of Aquitaine
Source:
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120. Record Number: 31171
Author(s):
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Title : Panel from the Humility Polyptych - Umilta reading to her nuns while they eat
Source:
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121. Record Number: 31990
Author(s):
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Title : Louis IX learning to read
Source:
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122. Record Number: 36277
Author(s):
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Title : Donor portraits of Margaret Blackburn and her husband Nicholas
Source:
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123. Record Number: 39177
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Annunciation and Two Saints
Source:
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