Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


36 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 38263
Author(s): Troup, Cynthia
Contributor(s):
Title : 'With Open Doors' in the Tor de' Specchi: The Chiesa Vecchia Frescoes and the Monks of Santa Maria Nova
Source: Studies on Florence and the Italian Renaissance in Honour of F. W. Kent.   Edited by Peter Howard and Cecilia Hewlett .   Brepols , 2016.  Pages 405 - 427.
Year of Publication: 2016.

2. Record Number: 29909
Author(s): Ehrenschwendtner, Marie-Luise
Contributor(s):
Title : Creating the Sacred Space Within: Enclosure as a Defining Feature in the Convent Life of Medieval Dominican Sisters (13th–15th c.)
Source: Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 301 - 316.
Year of Publication: 2010.

3. Record Number: 24045
Author(s): Schuchman, Anne M.
Contributor(s):
Title : "Within the Walls of Paradise": Space and Community in the "Vita" of Umiliana de' Cerchi [Umiliata dei Cerchi was a 13th century Florentine laywoman who, as a widow, lived a religious life in her family’s tower house. Franciscan friar Vito da Cortona wrote her “vita” shortly after her death in 1246. Schuchman focuses on the text's description of Umiliata’s life in the tower as a substitute for joining a monastery. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 49 - 64.
Year of Publication: 2009.

4. Record Number: 23299
Author(s): Dunlop, Anne
Contributor(s):
Title : The Dominicans and Cloistered Women: The Convent of Sant'Aurea in Rome
Source: Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal , 2., ( 2007):  Pages 43 - 71.
Year of Publication: 2007.

5. Record Number: 15840
Author(s): Weddle, Saundra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Identity and Alliance: Urban Presence, Spatial Privilege, and Florentine Renaissance Convents [The author analyses the locations and functions of women's monasteries in late medieval and early modern Florence. Weddle argues that architectural spaces carried multiple meanings. Womens' monasteries were places of spiritual work, but they also could convey meanings related to patronage and politics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006. Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal , 2., ( 2007):  Pages 394 - 412.
Year of Publication: 2006.

6. Record Number: 11420
Author(s): Hall, Dianne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Necessary Collaborations: Religious Women and Lay Communities in Medieval Ireland, c. 1200-1540 [The author argues that the boundaries between Irish women's monastic houses and lay communities were permeable. Nuns sought good relations with neighbors and family members to ensure material and political support. Monastic women needed to ignore the rules of enclosure in order to adminster the monasteries' lands and keep in touch with their families. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Irish Women's History.   Edited by Alan Hayes and Diane Urquhart .   Irish Academic Press, 2004. Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal , 2., ( 2007):  Pages 15 - 28.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 13673
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn
Contributor(s):
Title : Dead to the World? Death and the Maiden Revisited in Medieval Women's Convent Culture [This essay looks at letters and biographies in the convents of Heloise and her English and French colleagues against the social and cultural history of medieval death. Rejecting stereotypes of nuns as immured from the world in the gothic embrace of a grave, the essay explores a living culture of death in which women interceded on behalf of themselves and others, organized their cultural traditions, shaped institutional memory, and dealt with the administrative, practical, and symbolic aspects of nunnery cemeteries. Equipping women for the work of commemoration and communion with the dead was to equip them with the means of self-conscious shaping of their own and others’ lives and spiritualities. Abstract submitted to Feminae by the author.]
Source: Guidance for Women in Twelfth-Century Convents.   Edited by Translated by Vera Morton with an interpretive essay by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Library of Medieval Women .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal , 2., ( 2007):  Pages 157 - 180.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 8085
Author(s): Strocchia, Sharon T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Naming a Nun: Spiritual Exemplars and Corporate Identity in Florentine Convents, 1450-1530 [A newly professed nun frequently took a new name to mark her separation from the world and integration into a monastic community. This practice only slowly became common, especially for older girls entering monasteries. By the end of the fifteenth century, the practice, once sporadic, had become the norm. Names with classical or literary resonances were among those most frequently changed to more pious ones. Communities controlled their own naming practices, recycling the names of respected sisters for generations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence.   Edited by William J. Connell .   University of California Press, 2002. Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal , 2., ( 2007):  Pages 215 - 240.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 11035
Author(s): McAvoy, Liz Herbert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ant Nes He Him Seolf Reclus i Maries Wombe?: Julian of Norwich, the Anchorhold, and Redemption of the Monstrous Female Body [The author explores the themes of suffering and enclosure as characteristically feminine phenomena which gave anchoresses access to the divine. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal , 2., ( 2007):  Pages 128 - 143.
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 6720
Author(s): Pinder, Janice M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cloister and the Garden: Gendered Images of Religious Life from the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries
Source: Listen, Daughter: The "Speculum virginum" and the Formation of Religious Women in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Constant J. Mews .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Early Modern Women: An Interdisciplinary Journal , 2., ( 2007):  Pages 159 - 179.
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 5540
Author(s): Radke, Gary M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nuns and Their Art: The Case of San Zaccaria in Renaissance Venice [the nuns of San Zaccaria, mostly of good birth, had a symbiotic relationship with the city of Venice; public and private interests supported the nuns; and they responded by, among other things, patronizing art that was seen by visitors to their church; during the fifteenth century the nuns both redecorated their original church and, in the 1460s, built a new church alongside the old; the nuns not only funded these projects, they supervised the work to see that their wishes were heeded].
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 54, 2 (Summer 2001): 430-459. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 7040
Author(s): Uffmann, Heike.
Contributor(s):
Title : Inside and Outside the Convent Walls: The Norm and Practice of Enclosure in the Rerformed Nunneries of Late Medieval Germany
Source: Medieval History Journal , 4., 1 (January-June 2001):  Pages 83 - 108.
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 4668
Author(s): Pasztor, Edith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Il monachesimo femminile [women's monasticism appeared in the West later than men's and always was communal, involving some form of enclosure; women shared unequally in the new religious movements of the eleventh through thirteenth centuries; even Clare of Assisi was unable to share fully in the poverty of Francis; despite Heloise's plea for a rule adapted to women's needs, most women's monasteries followed the Benedictine or the Augustinian rule].
Source: Donne e sante: Studi sulla religiosità femminile nel Medio Evo. Edith Pasztor .   Edizioni Studium, 2000.  Pages 21 - 63. Originally published in Dall'eremo al cenobio. 1987. Pages 153-180.
Year of Publication: 2000.

14. Record Number: 4670
Author(s): Pasztor, Edith.
Contributor(s):
Title : I papi del duecento e trecento di fronte alla vita religiosa femminile [The popes of the thirteenth century paid less attention to female than to male religious. Innocent III promoted new forms of women's monasticism, but other popes were less bold. Papal protection was extended to women's monasteries, but this often involved the imposition of stricter enclosure. Nuns of this period frequently showed an intensified desire for union with God].
Source: Donne e sante: Studi sulla religiosità femminile nel Medio Evo. Edith Pasztor .   Edizioni Studium, 2000.  Pages 97 - 129. Originally published in Il movimento religioso femminile in Umbria nei secoli XIII- XIV. Firenze, 1984. Pages 29-65.
Year of Publication: 2000.

15. Record Number: 4598
Author(s): Lehfeldt, Elizabeth A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ruling Sexuality: The Political Legitimacy of Isabel of Castile
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 53, 1 (Spring 2000): 31-56. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2000.

16. Record Number: 4243
Author(s): Beach, Alison I.
Contributor(s):
Title : Claustration and Collaboration Between the Sexes in the Twelfth-Century Scriptorium [the author compares the book production practices of two German double houses; Admont valued women's learning and the abbot worked with nuns to write down his Biblical commentaries; Schäftlarn did not train women in writing nor allow them access to books, but women who could already write were put to work in the scriptorium].
Source: Monks and Nuns, Saints and Outcasts: Religion in Medieval Society. Essays in Honor of Lester K. Little.   Edited by Sharon Farmer and Barbara H. Rosenwein .   Cornell University Press, 2000.  Pages 57 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 4338
Author(s): Talbot, Alice-Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Space in Byzantine Monasteries
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 52 (1998): 113-127. Link Info Reprinted in Women and Religious Life in Byzantium. By Alice-Mary Talbot. Variorum Collected Studies Series. Ashgate, 2001. Article 15.
Year of Publication: 1998.

18. Record Number: 5002
Author(s): Filannino, Clotilde.
Contributor(s):
Title : Uno sguardo alla storia passata [The Foligno congregation of Third Order Franciscans resisted having strict enclosure imposed upon them by the Franciscan provincial chapter of 1430. Santa Anna in Foligno would not accept this decision until 1617].
Source: Il monachesimo femminile in Italia dall' Alto Medioevo al secolo XVII a confronto con l' oggi.   Edited by Gabriella Zarri .   San Pietro in Cariano: Il Segno dei Gabrielli editori, 1997.  Pages 407 - 416.
Year of Publication: 1997.

19. Record Number: 5005
Author(s): Facchiano, Annamaria.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monachesimo femminile nel Mezzogiorno medievale e moderno [The monastic history of southern Italy is complex. Several orders were present, some of Greek background; and regions display differences between them. Lay patrons often reserved to themselves the right to name the abbess, and nuns even built themselves private houses within the enclosure. Reform of these houses might require importing a new abbess from elsewhere, as well as strict enforcement of monastic enclosure and proper care for the monastery's patrimony].
Source: Il monachesimo femminile in Italia dall' Alto Medioevo al secolo XVII a confronto con l' oggi.   Edited by Gabriella Zarri .   San Pietro in Cariano: Il Segno dei Gabrielli editori, 1997.  Pages 169 - 191.
Year of Publication: 1997.

20. Record Number: 5007
Author(s): Occhipinti, Elisa.
Contributor(s):
Title : Il monachesimo femminile benedettino nell' Italia nord-occidentale (secc. Xi-xiii) [To the end of the thirteenth century, most aspects of monasticism, male or female, remained substantially similar. The women's monasteries of northwest Italy, many of them inside cities, tended to be controlled by powerful families, noble or patrician, who tended to provide both the abbesses and the lay managers of their patrimony. These monasteries took part in urban expansion and the exploitation of rural districts. Strict monastic enclosure, imposed late in the Middle Ages, reduced the importance of these ties with urban life and politics].
Source: Il monachesimo femminile in Italia dall' Alto Medioevo al secolo XVII a confronto con l' oggi.   Edited by Gabriella Zarri .   San Pietro in Cariano: Il Segno dei Gabrielli editori, 1997.  Pages 135 - 168.
Year of Publication: 1997.

21. Record Number: 11748
Author(s): Young, Abigail A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Theater-going Nuns in Rural Devon? [In 1329 the new bishop of Exeter ordered the canonesses at Canonsleigh Abbey to observe strict enclosure. In part he warned that they must avoid worldly shows ("spectacula"). Young suggests that he may have had in mind lay-sponsored events in Exeter like the satiric "ludus" against the city's shoemakers which later offended the bishop in 1352. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Records of Early English Drama , 22., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 25 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1997.

22. Record Number: 5651
Author(s): Gardner, Julian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nuns and Altarpieces: Agendas for Research [the author examines a group of late thirteenth-century paintings from Italian nunneries and a group of fourteenth-century convent altarpieces, mostly from Florence; he then considers the social, cultural, and physical conditions in which these artworks were created and viewed; he concludes by asking what kind of control did the nuns have over artworks that were commissioned through middlemen and, for that matter, did the nuns even see the altarpieces located beyond the grills required by "clausura"].
Source: Römisches Jahrbuch der Bibliotheca Hertziana , 30., ( 1995):  Pages 27 - 57.
Year of Publication: 1995.

23. Record Number: 6013
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : Religiosità e società femminile tra Medioevo e Rinascimento: disciplinamento sociale e istitutzioni religiose [women had few religious opportunities in the rural environment, and the new towns frequently offered just as few; thus women readily were attracted to heretical movements; only gradually were new forms of religiosity developed by the orthodox establishment to meet the needs of these women; even then, clergy who provided women with spiritual guidance emphasized discipline over all else].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995. Römisches Jahrbuch der Bibliotheca Hertziana , 30., ( 1995):  Pages 199 - 206.
Year of Publication: 1995.

24. Record Number: 9519
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queen Sancia of Mallorca and the Convent Church of Sta. Chiara in Naples [The author argues that the convent church building significantly departs from previous models of architectural planning in the Poor Clare tradition. In part she attributes this to Queen Sancia's deep devotion to the original ideals of Francis which prompted her to found a double house and redesign the church layout so that the nuns could see the host while remaining unseen by the laity and the Friars. The queen also was reacting to ecclesiastical controversies in which her own relatives took leading roles as proponents of the Franciscan Spirituals against Pope John XXII. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 40., ( 1995):  Pages 69 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1995.

25. Record Number: 6629
Author(s): Tylus, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mystical Enunciations: Mary, the Devil, and Quattrocento Spirituality [the author argues that Catherine Vigri's text, "Sette armi spirituali," written for the guidance of her Poor Clare sisters, embodies the era's growing doubts about mysticism and the ways to authenticate visions; the Virgin Mary at the Annunciation plays a central role for Catherine Vigri because she prefigures the mystic in the "clausura" of the convent, aware of diabolical dangers and maternal in her protection and love for her sisters].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 219 - 242. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 2085
Author(s): Tillotson, John..
Contributor(s):
Title : Visitation and Reform of the Yorkshire Nunneries in the Fourteenth Century [argues that the archbishops reacted to the papal bull "Periculoso," not by enforcing strict enclosure, but by regulating travel and contact with the outside world, so that the nuns would maintain their respectability].
Source: Northern History , 30., ( 1994):  Pages 1 - 21.
Year of Publication: 1994.

27. Record Number: 8479
Author(s): Gilchrist, Roberta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Bodies in the Material World: Gender, Stigma, and the Body [ The author addresses two issues, one of which concerns the defining of the gendered female body through high status architecture. The author compares the spaces for women in castles with female monasteries. She finds segregation and enclosure in both with physical boundaries to control access. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Northern History , 30., ( 1994):  Pages 43 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1994.

28. Record Number: 8478
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaste Bodies: Frames and Experiences [The author explores the "Ancrene Wisse," arguing that it embodies an ideology of containment for women in its emphasis on the enclosed, chaste body. At the same time there are slips since the manuscript shows glimpses of a textual community and even of anchoresses living together. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Northern History , 30., ( 1994):  Pages 24 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1994.

29. Record Number: 1305
Author(s): Brundage, James A. and Elizabeth M. Makowski
Contributor(s):
Title : Enclosure of Nuns: The Decretal "Periculoso" and Its Commentators [Benedict's decretal required strict enclosure for all nuns, regardless of the rule under which they lived or their rank; the authors include a translation of "Periculoso" in an appendix, pages 154-155].
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 20., 2 (June 1994):  Pages 143 - 155.
Year of Publication: 1994.

30. Record Number: 11207
Author(s): Gillette, Gertrude, O. S. B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Radegund’s Monastery of Poitiers: the Rule and its Observance [When she founded her monastery, Radegund established a Rule which stated that a nun must not leave the monastery up to the time of her death. While the Rule was intended to limit the nuns’ contact with the outside world, the nuns actually had frequent interactions with outsiders. Daily life did not necessarily correspond to the Rule, and nuns could adapt their interpretation of the Rule to suit special circumstances or to serve their own personal motivations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Patristica , 25., ( 1993):  Pages 381 - 387. Papers presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 1991. Biblica et Apocrypha, Orientalia, Ascetica
Year of Publication: 1993.

31. Record Number: 10295
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hearing is Believing: Clarissan Architecture, ca. 1213-1340 [The article studies convent churches in medieval Italy, in order to evaluate changes in the liturgical participation of Clarissan nuns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 83-91. Link Info Later published in Medieval Religion: New Approaches. Edited by Constance Hoffman Berman. Routledge, 2005. Pages 272-289.
Year of Publication: 1992.

32. Record Number: 10298
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Art, Enclosure and the "Cura Monialium": Prolegomena in the Guise of a Postscript [The author addresses the question of female spirituality in the Middle Ages by looking both at monastic architecture and female patronage within the visual arts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 108-134. Link InfoReprinted in The Visual and the Visionary: Art and Female Spirituality in Late Medieval Germany. By Jeffrey F. Hamburger. Zone Books, 1998. Pages 35-109.
Year of Publication: 1992.

33. Record Number: 10294
Author(s): Barriere, Bernadette.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cistercian Convent of Coyroux in the Twelfth and Thirteenth Centuries [The article considers the implications of the harsh living conditions at the Coyroux Cistercian convent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 76-82. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

34. Record Number: 11054
Author(s): Kelso, Carl, Jr.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Power: Fontevrault and the Paraclete Compared [The author argues that the Paraclet under Heloise shared many similarities with Fontevrault. Most importantly both institutions and their daughter houses were independent, not being affiliated with any monastic order and using their own rules. Both called for strong abbesses who held authority even over male functionaries. With their emphasis on female responsibility, both houses made provisions for noncloistered nuns to do business with the world. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Comitatus , 22., ( 1991):  Pages 55 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1991.

35. Record Number: 8651
Author(s): Papi, Anna Benvenuti.
Contributor(s):
Title : Forme comunitarie [The Franciscan third order originated as a para-monastic status for penitent women. It became, in the fifteenth century, assimilated to a monastic model. The popes permitted common dwellings and conceded privileges, but they expected strict monastic enclosure. Some of the Tuscan houses of tertiaries were tied to convents of the Franciscan observant movement. Appendix: pp. 589-592 Rule of the Third Order, from MS Palatino 118 in the Biblioteca Nazionale Centrale, Florence. Originally printed as "Le forme comunitarie della penitenza femminile francescana: Schede per un censimento toscano," in Prime manifestazioni di vita comunitaria maschile e femminile nel movimento francescano della penitenza: Atti del convegno di studi francescani, Assisi 30 giugno-2 luglio 1981, edited by R. Pazzelli and L. Temperini (Commissione Storica Internazionale T.O.R., 1982). Pages 389-449. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In castro poenitentiae: santità e società femminile nell’Italia medievali. Anna Benvenuti Papi .   Herder, 1990. Comitatus , 22., ( 1991):  Pages 531 - 592. Originally printed as "Le forme comunitarie della penitenza femminile francescana: Schede per un censimento toscano," in Prime manifestazioni di vita comunitaria maschile e femminile nel movimento francescano della penitenza: Atti del convegno di studi fr
Year of Publication: 1990.

36. Record Number: 31176
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Panel from the Humility Polyptych - Umilta miraculously leaves the convent of Santa Perpetua and crosses the river Lamone with dry feet
Source: Comitatus , 22., ( 1991):
Year of Publication: