Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


17 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 11434
Author(s): Dunlop, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Flesh and the Feminine: Early-Renaissance Images of the Madonna with Eve at Her Feet
Source: Oxford Art Journal , 25., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 127 - 147.
Year of Publication: 2002.

2. Record Number: 6616
Author(s): Johnson, Geraldine A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beautiful Brides and Model Mothers: The Devotional and Talismanic Functions of Early Modern Marian Reliefs [The author discusses fifteenth century madonna and child reliefs in regard to their production, devotional uses, levels of contemplation evoked, and as magical objects for marriage and the procreation of male babies].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002.  Pages 135 - 161.
Year of Publication: 2002.

3. Record Number: 5909
Author(s): Czarnecki, James G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Giovanni del Biondo's "Standing Madonna and Child": An Image of Mercy in the Late Trecento [the image of Madonna and Child is related to Mary's intercessory role; a standing Madonna, however, usually is depicted at burial sites; all of these standing images evoke Mary's personification of mercy shown to sinners, seeking mercy for the deceased person].
Source: Visions of Holiness: Art and Devotion in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Andrew Ladis and Shelley E. Zuraw .   Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2001. Oxford Art Journal , 25., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 93 - 100.
Year of Publication: 2001.

4. Record Number: 5910
Author(s): Zuraw, Shelley E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Efficacious Madonna in Quattrocento Rome: Spirituality in the Service of Papal Power [depictions of Madonna and Child in Renaissance Rome are more stately and remote than those done contemporaneously in Florence; a partial explanation is the continuous Roman tradition of iconic painting tied to images ascribed to Saint Luke as painter; another factor is the formality of the papal court; contemporaneous Florentine paintings are more intimate because they are designed for families, even the most powerful households in the city; Florentine motifs can be found borrowed in Rome by the more adventurous artists].
Source: Visions of Holiness: Art and Devotion in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Andrew Ladis and Shelley E. Zuraw .   Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2001. Oxford Art Journal , 25., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 101 - 121.
Year of Publication: 2001.

5. Record Number: 5689
Author(s): Cannon, Joanna
Contributor(s):
Title : The Stoclet "Man of Sorrows": A Thirteenth-century Italian Diptych Reunited [The author argues that the small panel formed a devotional diptych with a painting of the Virgin and Child; the author points out that the two panels engage each other and draw the viewer into the drama].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 141, 1151 (February 1999): 107-112. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

6. Record Number: 5681
Author(s): Callegari, Raimondo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bernardo Bembo and Pietro Lombardo; News from the "Nonianum" [The author argues that the newly discovered low-relief sculpture of the Virgin and Child was commissioned by the humanist Bernardo Bembo and sculpted by Pietro Lombardo who, with his workshop, did many such images of the Virgin and Child in the 1480s].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1137 (December 1997): 862-866. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

7. Record Number: 5682
Author(s): Wolohojian, Stephan S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesco di Simone Ferrucci's Fogg "Virgin and Child" and the Martini Chapel in S. Giobbe, Venice [The author argues that Francesco di Simone's large marble relief fills the empty frame of the Martini chapel altarpiece].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1137 (December 1997): 867-869. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

8. Record Number: 9516
Author(s): Demori Stanicic, Zoraida.
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Icons of Medieval Hvar
Source: Hortus Artium Medievalium , 2., ( 1996):  Pages 43 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1996.

9. Record Number: 4683
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Hail Most Saintly Lady: Change and Continuity in Marian Altarpieces [The author analyzes two Sienese altarpieces in detail with comparisons to Florentine and Paduan altarpieces].
Source: Siena, Florence, and Padua: Art, Society, and Religion, 1280-1400. Volume II: Case Studies.   Edited by Diana Norman .   Yale University Press in association with The Open University, 1995. Hortus Artium Medievalium , 2., ( 1996):  Pages 194 - 215.
Year of Publication: 1995.

10. Record Number: 20786
Author(s): Thürlemann, Felix
Contributor(s):
Title : Das Lukas-Tryptichon in Stolzenhain: Ein verlorenes Hauptwerk von Robert Campin in einer Kopie aus der Werkstatt Derick Baegerts [Compares the different versions of the triptych's middle panel and related issues of provenance; also examines Baegerts work with that of Campin (specifically the Merode Triptych). Minute details of the painting-such as the scenic background and use of evangelists' symbols-are used to delineate the work of Baegert from that of his workshop. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 51., ( 1992):  Pages 524 - 564.
Year of Publication: 1992.

11. Record Number: 10734
Author(s): Bynum, Caroline Walker.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Body of Christ in the Later Middle Ages: A Reply to Leo Steinberg [The author argues against Steinberg’s notion that Renaissance painters focused on Christ’s penis in order to make a theological statement about sexuality; she suggests instead that fifteenth-century artists show Jesus as both male and female, and saw his as a generative body. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Human Body in Medieval Religion. Caroline Walker Bynum .   MIT Press, 1991.  Pages 79 - 118.
Year of Publication: 1991.

12. Record Number: 11225
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Relic, Some Pictures and the Mothers of Florence in the Late Fourteenth Century
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 30, 2 (1991): 91-99. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

13. Record Number: 12682
Author(s): Corrie, Rebecca W.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Political Meaning of Coppo di Marcovaldo's Madonna and Child in Siena
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 1 (1990): 61-75. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

14. Record Number: 12746
Author(s): Bergman, Robert P.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Earliest Eleousa: A Coptic Ivory in the Walters Gallery [The author sets the date of the ivory Virgin and Child between the late sixth and early seventh century, and the iconography of the sculpture (which resembles other ivories carved in a similar style) confirms its attribution to an early Christian Egyptian workshop. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , 48., ( 1990):  Pages 37 - 56.
Year of Publication: 1990.

15. Record Number: 28813
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Thamyris
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/d/d6/De_mulieribus_claris_painter.jpg/250px-De_mulieribus_claris_painter.jpg
Year of Publication:

16. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Maesta (conjectural reconstruction of front view)
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/e/eb/Maest_0_duccio_1308-11_siena_duomo.jpg/250px-Maest_0_duccio_1308-11_siena_duomo.jpg
Year of Publication:

17. Record Number: 31461
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Madonna and Child on a Curved Throne
Source:
Year of Publication: