Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


63 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 32156
Author(s): Štefanac, Samo,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Devotional Context of a Miraculous Image: Niccolò di Giovanni Fiorentino's Madonna at Orebic
Source: Renaissance Studies in Honor of Joseph Connors.   Edited by Machtelt Israëls and Louis A. Waldman .   Villa i Tatti; Harvard University Press, 2013.  Pages 220 - 227.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 32397
Author(s): Luchs, Alison
Contributor(s):
Title : Verrocchio and the Bust of Albiera degli Albizzi: Portraits, Poetry and Commemoration
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 33., 66 ( 2012):  Pages 75 - 97.
Year of Publication: 2012.

3. Record Number: 29191
Author(s): Timmermann, Achim,
Contributor(s):
Title : Frau Venus, the Eucharist, and the Jews of Landshut
Source: Judaism and Christian Art: Aesthetic Anxieties from the Catacombs to Colonialism.   Edited by Herbert L. Kessler and David Nirenberg .   university of Pennsylvania Press, 2011. Artibus et Historiae , 33., 66 ( 2012):  Pages 183 - 202.
Year of Publication: 2011.

4. Record Number: 29256
Author(s): Rowe, Nina,
Contributor(s):
Title : Rethinking "Ecclesia" and "Synagoga" in the Thirteenth Century [The author argues that the representation of "Synagoga" in the sculptural programs at Bamberg, Reims, and Strasbourg was meant to project a view of Judaism as subordinate to "Ecclesia" triumphant and to the kingly rulers on the portals. Title note suppl
Source: Gothic Art and Thought in the Later Medieval Period: Essays in Honor of Willibald Sauerländer.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Penn State University Press, 2011. Artibus et Historiae , 33., 66 ( 2012):  Pages 264 - 291.
Year of Publication: 2011.

5. Record Number: 18171
Author(s): Simons, Patricia
Contributor(s):
Title : Separating the Men from the Boys: Masculinites in Early Quattrocento Florence and Donatello's "Saint George" [Nineteenth and twentieth century scholars projected an idealized masculinity onto Renaissance Florence. Seen from this viewpoint, Donatello's "Saint George" is an idealized young man just entering maturity. The supposed display of manly self control fits in with ideals of masculinity described by humanists like Leonardo Bruni. This, however, involves rejecting alternative evidence showing how homoerotic desire and nostalgia for lost youth were projected onto the same image by some Florentines. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Rituals, Images, and Words: Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by F. W. Kent and Charles Zika Late Medieval Early Modern Studies .   Brepols, 2005. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 147 - 176.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 20780
Author(s): Eckhard, Simon
Contributor(s):
Title : The First German Mary Assumption Play (c.1300) and the Mary Portal of Strasbourg Cathedral [Investigates the relationship between thirteenth and fourteenth century German Assumption plays, the Song of Solomon/Song of Songs, and the carvings of Strasbourg Cathedral. Focuses on the plays' and carvings' use of the figures of "Ecclesia" as bride and God as Solomon, with God/Solomon's embrace of "Synagoga" acting as a device to encourage the conversion of Jews. The relationship between Mary and the figure of "Ecclesia" is also discussed. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 1 - 23.
Year of Publication: 2005.

7. Record Number: 14634
Author(s): Michalsky, Tanja.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mater serenissimi principis: The Tomb of Maria of Hungary
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 61 - 77.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 10901
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Tomb of Adelaide of Maurienne and the Visual Imagery of Capetian Queenship [The author argues that while Adelaide's seal establishes her authority through stable conservative imagery, her tomb sculpture marks her as an individual with a special connection to the sacred site. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 45 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2003.

9. Record Number: 11960
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Queen's Choice: Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Tombs at Fontevraud [The tombs Eleanor of Aquitaine commissioned for Henry II, Richard I, and herself at Fontevrault, with their life-like images of royalty, were novel in their day. Eleanor was probably not inspired by royal tombs she saw on her travels, although Capetian queens' tombs had incised images. Eleanor's own tomb showed her as a living person, whereas the others were shown lying in state. It appears that Eleanor took charge of all these commemorations of the Plantagenet dead. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 377 - 405.
Year of Publication: 2003.

10. Record Number: 11649
Author(s): Dor, Juliette.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sheela-na-Gig: An Incongruous Sign of Sexual Purity? [The author argues for a complex reading of the sheela na gig statues, naked women displaying their vulvas. Dor contextualizes them with references to Celtic goddesses as well as the sovereignty myth in which the old hag turns into a beautiful maiden. In concluding the author suggests that medieval audiences might have had different reactions and that the sculptures lend themselves to multiple readings. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Virginities.   Edited by Anke Bernau, Ruth Evans, and Sarah Salih .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages series. University of Wales Press; University of Toronto Press, 2003. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 33 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2003.

11. Record Number: 11034
Author(s): Rees, Emma L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sheela's Voracity and Victorian Veracity [The author examines the reactions of G.R. Lewis, Victorian artist and church architect, to a sheela-na-gig (a sqatting female figure who pulls open her vulva) carved on a Romanesque church in Kilpeck. Lewis sanitized the figure but Rees argues that the sculpture had meaning for the church's builders most likely as a warning against lust. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 116 - 127.
Year of Publication: 2002.

12. Record Number: 9336
Author(s): Sterling-Hellenbrand, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Uta and Isolde: Designing a Perfect Woman [The author argues that Gottfried von Strassburg, the creator of Isolde, and the Naumburger Meister who sculpted the statues of Uta and Reglindis not only shared a set of ideals in regard to women but also made their representations of women dynamic and interactive. The description of Isolde's dress does not emphasize color or richness of cloth but instead continuous movement that produces a performance of gender. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 70-89. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

13. Record Number: 8422
Author(s): Rico Camps, Daniel.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Shrine in its Setting: San Vicente de Ávila [As a part of this article the author briefly describes (pp. 67-68) the shrine of Saint Vincent's two sisters, Sabina and Cristeta, who were martyred along with him. The author argues that the shrine was constructed at the same time as St. Vincent's more imposing tomb in the late twelfth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Decorations for the holy dead: visual embellishments on tombs and shrines of saints.   Edited by Stephen Lamia and Elizabeth Valdez del Álamo International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 2002.  Pages 57 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2002.

14. Record Number: 8424
Author(s): Español, Francesca.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sepulchre of Saint Juliana in the Collegiate Church of Santillana del Mar [The author argues that the reliefs of St. Juliana, the Virgin and Child, Christ in Majesty, and apostles all originally decorated a monumental sepulchre of the martyr Saint Juliana in the latter half of the twelfth century. In the fifteenth century Bishop Alonso de Cartagena translated her relics to an altar and remodelled the now-empty tomb to take up less space. Perhaps local devotion required the continued presence of the tomb. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Decorations for the holy dead: visual embellishments on tombs and shrines of saints.   Edited by Stephen Lamia and Elizabeth Valdez del Álamo International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 2002.  Pages 191 - 218.
Year of Publication: 2002.

15. Record Number: 6616
Author(s): Johnson, Geraldine A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beautiful Brides and Model Mothers: The Devotional and Talismanic Functions of Early Modern Marian Reliefs [The author discusses fifteenth century madonna and child reliefs in regard to their production, devotional uses, levels of contemplation evoked, and as magical objects for marriage and the procreation of male babies].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002.  Pages 135 - 161.
Year of Publication: 2002.

16. Record Number: 5874
Author(s): Jennings, Margaret.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Three Marys of Bourges [The author briefly explores the representations of the Virgin Mary, Mary Magdalene, and Mary of Egypt in the Cathedral of Bourges and comments on the theological meaning of their lives].
Source: Downside Review , 119., 414 (January 2001):  Pages 35 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2001.

17. Record Number: 5908
Author(s): Smith, Janet G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Santa Umiltà of Faenza: Her Florentine Convent and Its Art [in the early 16th century the Florentines destroyed the monastery of San Giovanni Evangelista, outside the walls, to improve the city's defenses; this house had been founded by the Vallombrosan nun Umiltà of Faenza; much of its surviving art depicts Umiltà with a weasel, the enemy of the serpent, symbol of evil; this animal was displaced in later art by a book, and that too vanished in Counter-Reformation depictions of Umiltà, in which she becomes a generic saint without distinguishing symbols].
Source: Visions of Holiness: Art and Devotion in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Andrew Ladis and Shelley E. Zuraw .   Georgia Museum of Art, University of Georgia, 2001. Downside Review , 119., 414 (January 2001):  Pages 37 - 65.
Year of Publication: 2001.

18. Record Number: 5042
Author(s): Innes- Parker, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sheela-na-gigs and Other Unruly Women: Images of Land and Gender in Medieval Ireland
Source: From Ireland Coming: Irish Art from the Early Christian to the Late Gothic Period and Its European Context.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Deparment of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2001. Gesta , 40., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 313 - 331.
Year of Publication: 2001.

19. Record Number: 5791
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Donatello's Bronze "David" and "Judith" as Metaphors of Medici Rule in Florence
Source: Art Bulletin , 83., 1 (March 2001):  Pages 32 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2001.

20. Record Number: 6422
Author(s): Cohen, Adam S. and Anne Derbes
Contributor(s):
Title : Bernward and Eve at Hildesheim
Source: Gesta , 40., 1 ( 2001):  Pages 19 - 38.
Year of Publication: 2001.

21. Record Number: 4433
Author(s): Dunkelman, Martha Levine.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Innocent Salome [the author argues that early painters, such as Giotto, depicted Salome as detached and passive; it is only with Donatello that Salome displays a moral conscience, showing distress at the fate of John the Baptist; in the sixteenth century Salome takes on the role of seductress and thereby assumes responsibility for the death of John the Baptist].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 133., 1563 (avril 1999):  Pages 173 - 180.
Year of Publication: 1999.

22. Record Number: 4434
Author(s): Kwakkelstein, Michael W.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Use of Sculptural Models by Italian Renaissance Painters: Leonardo da Vinci's "Madonna of the Rocks" Reconsidered in Light of His Working Procedures
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 133., 1563 (avril 1999):  Pages 181 - 198.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 6326
Author(s): Weilandt, Gerhard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Standortstudien I. Die "Nürnberger Madonna" in der Kirche--Ein neuer Fund zu originalem Aufstellungsort und ikonographischem Kontext
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 62., 4 ( 1999):  Pages 494 - 511.
Year of Publication: 1999.

24. Record Number: 3654
Author(s): Dressler, Rachel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Steel Corpse: Imaging the Knight in Death [The author argues that British tomb effigies constructed an elite, warrior masculinity].
Source: Conflicted Identities and Multiple Masculinities: Men in the Medieval West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray .   Garland Medieval Casebooks, volume 25. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, volume 2078. Garland Publishing, 1999. Downside Review , 119., 414 (January 2001):  Pages 135 - 167.
Year of Publication: 1999.

25. Record Number: 4880
Author(s): Eastmond, Antony.
Contributor(s):
Title : Narratives of the Fall: Structure and Meaning in the Genesis Frieze at Hagia Sophia, Trebizond [The author analyzes an unusual sculptured narrative frieze, finding in part that there is a decidedly misogynist cast to the frieze with the creation of woman as the start of the problem of evil and a clear link between Eve and death].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers (Full Text via JSTOR) 53 (1999): 219-236. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

26. Record Number: 3319
Author(s): Kenaan-Kedar, Nurith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Aliénor: d'Aquitaine conduite en captivité. Les peintures murales, commémoratives de Sainte- Radegonde de Chinon
Source: Cahiers de Civilization Médiévale , 41., 164 (octobre-décembre 1998):  Pages 317 - 330.
Year of Publication: 1998.

27. Record Number: 1591
Author(s): Armstead, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Interpreting Images of Women with Books in Misericords [some represent piety, while others mock women's pretensions].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Studies in Iconography , 18., ( 1997):  Pages 57 - 74.
Year of Publication: 1997.

28. Record Number: 3671
Author(s): Johnson, Geraldine A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Idol or Ideal? The Power and Potency of Female Public Sculpture [The author argues that by the late sixteenth century female statuary in Florence had been removed or moved to less prominent locations; the author suggests that there is a correlation with the patriarchal attitudes of the male art patrons].
Source: Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.   Edited by Geraldine A. Johnson and Sara F. Mathews Grieco .   Cambridge University Press, 1997. Studies in Iconography , 18., ( 1997):  Pages 222 - 245.
Year of Publication: 1997.

29. Record Number: 2560
Author(s): Taralon, Jean
Contributor(s): Taralon-Carlini, Dominique, avec la collaboration de
Title : La Majesté d' or de Sainte Foy de Conques [see the accompanying article #2561 on the statue's crown].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 155., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 11 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1997.

30. Record Number: 5681
Author(s): Callegari, Raimondo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bernardo Bembo and Pietro Lombardo; News from the "Nonianum" [The author argues that the newly discovered low-relief sculpture of the Virgin and Child was commissioned by the humanist Bernardo Bembo and sculpted by Pietro Lombardo who, with his workshop, did many such images of the Virgin and Child in the 1480s].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1137 (December 1997): 862-866. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

31. Record Number: 5682
Author(s): Wolohojian, Stephan S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesco di Simone Ferrucci's Fogg "Virgin and Child" and the Martini Chapel in S. Giobbe, Venice [The author argues that Francesco di Simone's large marble relief fills the empty frame of the Martini chapel altarpiece].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1137 (December 1997): 867-869. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

32. Record Number: 4348
Author(s): Holladay, Joan A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Relics, Reliquaries, and Religious Women: Visualizing the Holy Virgins of Cologne [the author points to the growth in the cult of Ursula and her virgins including the excavations of their supposed bodies, renovation of the church dedicated to the martyrs, and the invention of Ursula busts; the author suggests that the cult and the busts were designed to appeal to the daughters of patricians and burghers by showing that a holy life could be found in their social class and in marriage rather than in the extremes of the Beguines].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 18., ( 1997):  Pages 67 - 118.
Year of Publication: 1997.

33. Record Number: 769
Author(s): Valdez Del Alamo, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lament for a Lost Queen: The Sarcophagus of Doña Blanca in Nájera
Source: Art Bulletin (Full Text via JSTOR) 78, 2 (June 1996): 311-333. Link Info Later published in Memory and the Medieval Tomb. Edited by Elizabeth Valdez del Alamo with Carol Stamatis Pendergast. Ashgate, 2000. Pages 43-79.
Year of Publication: 1996.

34. Record Number: 2330
Author(s): Neuman de Vegvar, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saints and Companions to Saints: Anglo-Saxon Royal Women Monastics in Context
Source: Holy Men and Holy Women: Old English Prose Saints' Live and Their Contexts.   Edited by Paul E. Szarmach .   State University of New York Press, 1996.  Pages 51 - 93.
Year of Publication: 1996.

35. Record Number: 2380
Author(s): Hooper, Bari.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Medieval Depiction of Infant-Feeding in Winchester Cathedral [misericord depicts an infant drinking from a cow's horn].
Source: Medieval Archaeology , 40., ( 1996):  Pages 230 - 233.
Year of Publication: 1996.

36. Record Number: 3486
Author(s): Vilatte, Sylvie.
Contributor(s):
Title : La "déuote Image noire de Nostre-Dame" du Puy-en-Velay: histoire du reliquaire roman et de son noircissement [The author argues that the Virgin from Puy-en-Velay had her face blackened in the fourteenth century in response to pressures from crusades and efforts to convert the Muslims].
Source: Revue Belge de Philologie et d'Historie , 74., 2 ( 1996):  Pages 727 - 760.
Year of Publication: 1996.

37. Record Number: 2541
Author(s): Nolan, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ploratus et Ululatus: The Mothers in the Massacre of the Innocents at Chartres Cathedral [argues that female viewers of the Frieze cared about the welfare of their children, saw the Virgin at Chartres as a protector of children, and recognized mourning as a particularly female responsibility ; also surveys twelfth-century representations of the Massacre in manuscript illuminations and sculpture].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 17., ( 1996):  Pages 95 - 141.
Year of Publication: 1996.

38. Record Number: 2355
Author(s): Farr, Carol A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reception of Word and Image at Whitby and Its Daughter Houses
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

39. Record Number: 2356
Author(s): Hawkes, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sermons in Stone: Sculpture, Iconography, and the Christianization of the North
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

40. Record Number: 1612
Author(s): Fabrié, Marie- Luce.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images de la femme dans les consoles sculptées de la fin du gothique en Languedoc Oriental
Source: La Femme dans l' histoire et la société méridionales (IXe-XIXe S.): Actes du 66e congrés. .   Fédération historique du Languedoc méditerranéen et du Roussillon, 1995. Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):  Pages 243 - 254.
Year of Publication: 1995.

41. Record Number: 1647
Author(s): Durliat, Marcel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sculpture gothique. Un nouveau regard sur la châsse de Sainte Eulalie à la cathédrale de Barcelone [summary of an article by Josep Bracons Clapés, "Lupo di Francesco, mestre pisà, autor del sepulcre de Santa Eulàlia" published in D'Art 19 (1993): 43-51].
Source: Bulletin Monumental , 153., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 80
Year of Publication: 1995.

42. Record Number: 2722
Author(s): Jensen, Robin M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Femininity of Christ in Early Christian Iconography [suggests that feminine attributes of Jesus, including long, curly hair, smooth, beardless cheeks, and small, protruding breasts, were borrowed from savior deities of the mystery cults, especially Dionysus and Orpheus].
Source: Studia Patristica , 29., ( 1995):  Pages 269 - 282. Papers Presented at the Twelfth International Conference on Patristic Studies Held in Oxford. Historia, Theologica et Philosophica, Critica et Philologica
Year of Publication: 1995.

43. Record Number: 486
Author(s): Kelly, Eamonn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sheela-na-gigs: Symbol and Meaning in Transition [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 92].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

44. Record Number: 5675
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : New Documents Concerning Desiderio da Settignano and Annalena Malatesta [notarial records survive in which Annalena Malatesta, a noble and wealthy widow, paid the scupltor Desiderio da Settignano for a statue of Mary Magdalene and a bust of Christ; in the Appendix to the article the author transcribes the relevant extracts from the ledger for Annalena; although Annalena founded a Tertiary Dominican house for the protection and education of young widows and virgins, the sculpture of Mary Magdalene was evidently not intended for the convent but for S. Trinità and the altar of the Cerbini family which included Annalena's notary].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 137, 1113 (December 1995): 792-799. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

45. Record Number: 229
Author(s): Campbell, C. Jean.
Contributor(s):
Title : Courting, Harlotry, and the Art of Gothic Ivory Carving
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 1 (1995): 11-19. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

46. Record Number: 149
Author(s): Sekules, Veronica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beauty and the Beast: Ridicule and Orthodoxy in Architectural Marginalia in Early Fourteenth-Century Lincolnshire [sculpted corbels, several of women representing various sins].
Source: Art History , 18., 1 (March 1995):  Pages 37 - 62.
Year of Publication: 1995.

47. Record Number: 488
Author(s): Hawkes, A. Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : An Iconography of Female "Humilitas": The Wirksworth Slab and Its Audience [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 53].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

48. Record Number: 1883
Author(s): Smartt, Daniel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cruising Twelfth-Century Pilgrims [analysis of the sexual elements found in the Moissac "Luxuria" and a miracle story involving male pilgrims].
Source:   Edited by Whitney Davis Journal of Homosexuality , 27., 40180 ( 1994):  Pages 35 - 55. Published simultaneously in Gay and Lesbian Studies in Art History. Edited by Whitney Davis. Haworth Press, 1994. 35-55
Year of Publication: 1994.

49. Record Number: 1486
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Nude Judith from Padua and the Reception of Donatello's Bronze David [argues that the bronze statuette of Judith is modelled on Donatello's David and shares with it an ambiguous, eroticized vision of the usual heroic nude].
Source: Comitatus , 25., ( 1994):  Pages 59 - 80. [contributions are accepted from graduate students and those who have received their doctorate within the last three years]
Year of Publication: 1994.

50. Record Number: 1919
Author(s): Ricco, John Paul.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queering Boundaries: Semen and Visual Representations from the Middle Ages and in the Era of the AIDS Crisis [analysis of the sexuality expressed in a carved corbel that represents two men tugging on each other's beards; comparison with recent paintings by Ridgeway Bennett].
Source:   Edited by Whitney Davis Journal of Homosexuality , 27., 40180 ( 1994):  Pages 57 - 80. Published simultaneously in Gay and Lesbian Studies in Art History. Edited by Whitney Davis. Haworth Press, 1994. 57-80
Year of Publication: 1994.

51. Record Number: 11665
Author(s): Barasch, Frances K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Norwich Cathedral: The Bauchun Chapel Legend of the Accused Queen [Thirty-two sculpted bosses in Bauchun Chapel retell the Virgin's miracle of the queen falsely accused. The author argues that the sculptors drew on a number of different sources including the "Gesta Romanorum," an early Latin miracle of the Virgin, and Gautier de Coinci's retelling of the miracle in verse. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Early Drama, Art, and Music Review , 15., 2 (Spring 1993):  Pages 63 - 75.
Year of Publication: 1993.

52. Record Number: 12729
Author(s): Baskins, Cristelle L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Donatello's Bronze 'David': Grillanda, Goliath, Groom? [Art historians have explored many perspectives on Donatello's youthful and androgynous representation of the nude David including psychoanalytic and homoerotic perspectives, but these male centered approaches overlook the possibility of a female audience for the statue. Paintings on contemporary Florentine cassoni (wedding chests), including scenes from the life of David (like his battle with Goliath or his subsequent wedding to a royal bride) or seemingly unrelated depictions of scantily clad males (often painted underneath the lids), establish the possibility of a wedding context for Donatello's sensuous nude. In the context of nuptial imagery, this representation of David might appeal to a prospective bride as well as the narcissistic or homoerotic desire of an imagined male audience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 113 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1993.

53. Record Number: 10731
Author(s): Smith, Nicola.
Contributor(s):
Title : Appendix: A Note on the Conservation of the Geddington Cross [The author discusses the history of the Geddington Cross's conservation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 93 - 95.
Year of Publication: 1991.

54. Record Number: 10729
Author(s): Coldstream, Nicola.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Commissioning and Design of the Eleanor Crosses [The author argues that Edward I’s extravagant mourning of Eleanor, epitomized by the commissioning of the Eleanor Crosses, intended to demonstrate the splendor of royalty. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 55 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1991.

55. Record Number: 10727
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: The Eleanor Crosses and Royal Burial Customs [The author shows that Edward I’s decisions regarding Eleanor’s remains drew on a number of funerary practices that had developed in France and England during the twelfth and thirteenth centuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 9 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1991.

56. Record Number: 10730
Author(s): Lindley, Phillip.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sculptural Memorials of Queen Eleanor and their Context [The author shows that the vertical, multiplied images of Eleanor on her memorials and tomb effigies in effect elide secular and ecclesiastical iconography, and make her appear saintly. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Eleanor of Castile 1290-1990: Essays to Commemorate the 700th Anniversary of her death: 28 November 1290.   Edited by David Parsons .   Paul Watkins, 1991. Studies in Iconography , 15., ( 1993):  Pages 69 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1991.

57. Record Number: 12681
Author(s): Blum, Pamela Z.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Statue-Column of a Queen from Saint-Thibaut, Provins, in the Glencairn Museum
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 2 (1990): 214-233. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

58. Record Number: 12744
Author(s): Balas, Edith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cybele and Her Cult in Andrea Mantegna's "The Triumph of Caesar" [English adaptation of French abstract: The article explains in detail the presence, never before noted, of the pagan goddess Cybele in the series of paintings by Mantegna, "The Triumph of Caesar." Mantegna draws upon Classical and early medieval art and literature in order to present Cybele in different roles: political, military, and religious. The author analyzes Cybele in relation to her cult, suggesting that, during the time of Julius Caesar, she became a national goddess. She was carried along from Gaul by the army for protection, and was brought into Rome in triumph as a spoil of war. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 115., (January 1990):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1990.

59. Record Number: 12692
Author(s): Kaske, R. E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Amnon and Thamar on a Misericord in a Hereford Cathedral [Although the majority of misericords appear to depict secular scenes, one misericord in the Hereford Cathedral may in fact depict a Biblical scene: the episode of Amnon and Thamar (here, Amnon makes advances toward his half-sister Thamar just before he rapes her). Rather than being too unsuitable or obscure for an appearance on a misericord, this episode of rape and incest was well known and often moralized by medieval commentators. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 1 - 10.
Year of Publication: 1990.

60. Record Number: 12680
Author(s): Valdez Del Alamo, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Triumphal Visions and Monastic Devotion: The Annunciation Relief of Santo Domingo de Silos
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 2 (1990): 167-188. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

61. Record Number: 12746
Author(s): Bergman, Robert P.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Earliest Eleousa: A Coptic Ivory in the Walters Gallery [The author sets the date of the ivory Virgin and Child between the late sixth and early seventh century, and the iconography of the sculpture (which resembles other ivories carved in a similar style) confirms its attribution to an early Christian Egyptian workshop. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , 48., ( 1990):  Pages 37 - 56.
Year of Publication: 1990.

62. Record Number: 2986
Author(s): Holbert, Kelly.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Vindication of a Controversial Early Thirteenth-Century "Vierge Ouvrante" in the Walters Art Gallery
Source: Journal of the Walters Art Gallery , ( ):  Pages 101 - 121.
Year of Publication:

63. Record Number: 14668
Author(s): Garzelli, Annarosa.
Contributor(s):
Title : Una postilla sulla Madonna Davanzati [The Madonna Davanzati, a polychrome wooden sculpture recently sold at auction, can be dated to the early fourteenth century. Its style is Sienese with resemblances to the work of Arnolfo di Cambio. [Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Arte Medievale , 2., 40525 ( ):  Pages 239 - 241.
Year of Publication: