Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


56 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 19217
Author(s): DeLeeuw, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mary as Model: The Sacred Becomes Secular in Medieval Art [In this short, introductory essay for an art exhibit, the author traces the themes and representations of Mary in art across the centuries. DeLeeuw argues in part that paintings of a young, beautiful Mary in fashionable clothing served to bridge the gap between religious and secular art. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Secular Sacred: 11th-16th Century Works from the Boston Public Library and the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston.   Edited by Nancy Netzer .   McMullen Museum of Art, 2006.  Pages 64 - 67.
Year of Publication: 2006.

2. Record Number: 20730
Author(s): Mecham, June L
Contributor(s):
Title : Breaking Old Habits: Recent Research on Women, Spirituality, and the Arts in the Middle Ages
Source: History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 448 - 480.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 11760
Author(s): Schleif, Corine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men on the Right- Women on the Left: (A)symmetrical Spaces and Gendered Places [The author argues that the symbolism attached to left and right becomes gendered so that male and female donors have their appointed places. Yet some situations and artworks make the categories more complicated than a simple binary. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 207 - 249.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 14123
Author(s): Bleyerveld, Yvonne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Powerful Women, Foolish Men: The Popularity of the "Power of Women" Topos in Art [The author briefly describes the subject matter, themes, and audiences for the Power of Women topos. Biblical stories and classical myths provided the narratives in which dominant women humiliated the men who were in love with them. Bleyerveld argues tha
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005. History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 166 - 175.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 11059
Author(s): Bisogni, Fabio.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'iconografia mariana nei secoli XI-XII [The cult of the Virgin Mary was adopted by ruling elites, lay and clerical, in the eleventh and twelfth centuries. Seated figures of the Madonna, facing the viewer with the infant Jesus on her lap, predominated with their expressions of the superiority of spiritual power. These derived from Byzantine models, and less formal poses were evolved only later. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Figure poetiche e figure teologiche nella mariologia dei secoli XI e XII: Atti del II Convegno Mariologico della Fondazione Ezio Franceschini con la collaborazione della Biblioteca Palatina di Parma, Parma, 19-20 maggio 2000.   Edited by Clelia Maria Piastra and Francesco Santi .   SISMEL, 2004. History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 31 - 43.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 10782
Author(s): Field, Richard S.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fifteenth-Century Woodcut of the "Death of the Virgin" in a Manuscript of "Der Stachel der Liebe" [The author examines the development and meaning of an iconographic theme, the figure of the kneeling Virgin in woodcut scenes of the Dormition. This devotional image presented Mary as humankind's stongest intercessor with both her son and God. It also served as a model for the good death with Mary kneeling in pious prayer as her earthly life ends. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 71 - 137.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 8068
Author(s): Sheingorn, Pamela.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wise Mother : The Image of St.Anne Teaching the Virgin Mary [The author argues that medieval images of Saint Anne teaching the Virgin have been ignored by scholars. As a result both the importance of mothers as teachers and the prevalence of literacy among upper and middle class women has been downplayed. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 105 - 134. This article was first published in Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 32, 1 (1993): 69-80. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 10781
Author(s): Schmidt, Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Use of Prints in German Convents of the Fifteenth Century: The Example of Nuremberg [The author focuses on the uses made by nuns in the Dominican house, the Katharinenkloster. Schmidt argues that the woodcuts were a medium of communication among nuns as well as between confessors and their female penitents. Title note supplied by Feminae
Source: Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 43 - 69.
Year of Publication: 2003.

9. Record Number: 7253
Author(s): Gerát, Ivan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dei saturitas. St. Elizabeth's Works of Mercy in the Medieval Pictorial Narrative ["In this article, I examine a significant and unknown part of the pictorial tradition that surrounds St. Elizabeth in Central Europe and concentrate, in particular, on one group of scenes which can be generally referred to as her works of mercy. The significant questions of identity and differences within this group are analyzed. Some aspcts of these scenes changed very subtly; I evaluate these differences in relation to their historical context and consider how they reflected the development of liturgical and devotional practices. The main focus of this paper, however, is an evaluation of the theory that pictorial images of St. Elizabeth may be in imitation of those representing Christ." Page 168.].
Source: Insights and Interpretations: Studies in Celebrations of the Eighty-Fifth Anniversary of the Index of Christian Art.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Princeton University Press, 2002. Studies in Iconography , 24., ( 2003):  Pages 168 - 181.
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 8851
Author(s): Blanton-Whetsell, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Imagines Aetheldredae: Mapping Hagiographic Representations of Abbatial Power and Religious Patronage [The author studies the veneration of Saint Æthelthryth (or Etheldreda) in England across the Middle Ages and across both lay and religious audiences. She argues that scholars frequently divide the evidence of a saint's cult along academic disciplinary lines. They thereby miss evidence that is crucial for their understanding of a saint and those who honored her. Appendix A is an extensive inventory of representations, texts, and buildings concerning or devoted to Saint Ethelreda. Known origins are also indicated. Appendix B is a chart that tabulates the data in Appendix A. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 55 - 107.
Year of Publication: 2002.

11. Record Number: 5787
Author(s): Walker, Rose.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Royal and Aristocratic Burial in Northern Spain, c. 950- c. 1250 [the author points out that the most successful efforts toward "memoria" were made by a united and strong royal couple and put into the hands of a female foundation; the two outstanding examples of royal pantheons are San Isidoro at León (built by King Fernando I and Queen Sancha with the subsequent support of their daughter Urraca) and Las Huelgas (built by King Alfonso VIII and Queen Eleanor)].
Source: Medieval Memories: Men, Women, and the Past, 700-1300.   Edited by Elisabeth van Houts .   Women and Men in History Series. Longman, 2001. Studies in Iconography , 23., ( 2002):  Pages 150 - 172.
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 5539
Author(s): Baader, Gerhard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Elections of Abbesses and Notions of Identity in Fifteenth- and Sixteenth-Century Italy, with Special Reference to Venice
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 54, 2 (Summer 2001): 389-429. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 6236
Author(s): Wilkins, David G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: Recognizing New Patrons, Posing New Questions [The author identifies secular women as important patrons of art whose identities and motivations need to be explored].
Source: Beyond Isabella: Secular Women Patrons of Art in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Sheryl E. Reiss and David G. Wilkins .   Sixteenth Century Essays and Studies, Volume 54. Truman State University Press, 2001.  Pages 1 - 17.
Year of Publication: 2001.

14. Record Number: 5888
Author(s): Kotsis, Kriszta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Theodora, Guardian of the Faith [The author considers the representations of Empress Theodora (empress, 842-856 C. E.) on coins and seals and as a saint].
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 27., ( 2001):  Pages 25
Year of Publication: 2001.

15. Record Number: 5858
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Weasels and Pregnancy in Renaissance Italy
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 15., 2 (June 2001):  Pages 172 - 187.
Year of Publication: 2001.

16. Record Number: 4138
Author(s): McKenna, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Gift of a Lady: Women as Patrons of the Arts in Medieval Ireland
Source: Women in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Christine Meek .   Four Courts Press, 2000. Past and Present , 169., (November 2000):  Pages 84 - 94.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 6192
Author(s): Passolunghi, Pier Angelo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sulla Beata Giuliana di Collalto [the abbess Giuliana di Collalto died in 1262; thereafter she was commemorated in Venetian hagiography and art down to the eighteenth century].
Source: Archivio Veneto Series V , 189., 131 ( 2000):  Pages 103 - 111.
Year of Publication: 2000.

18. Record Number: 14835
Author(s): Hamburger, Jeffrey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing and Believing: The Suspicion of Sight and the Authentication of Vision in Late Medieval Art [Late medieval art and visionary theology both reveal an ambivalence about the role of corporeal sight in religion. A desire for direct vision of the divine was coupled with skepticism about claims to bodily sight. Images that aped bodily experience, especially in Flemish art, also gave some theologians cause for concern. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Imagination und Wirklichkeit: Zum Verhältnis von mentalen und realen Bilder in der Kunst der frühen Neuzeit.   Edited by Alessandro Nova and Klaus Krüger .   Von Zabern, 2000. Archivio Veneto Series V , 189., 131 ( 2000):  Pages 47 - 70.
Year of Publication: 2000.

19. Record Number: 8499
Author(s): Garsoïan, Nina G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sirarpie Der Nersessian (1896-1989) [The author presents a biographical sketch of Der Nersessian, a founder of the study of Armenian art. The sketch focuses on her scholarly research and publications. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Scholarship: Biographical Studies on the Formation of a Discipline. Volume 3: Philosophy and the Arts.   Edited by Helen Damico with Donald Fennema and Karmen Lenz Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, 2110.   Garland Publishing, 2000. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 15., 2 (June 2001):  Pages 287 - 305.
Year of Publication: 2000.

20. Record Number: 4748
Author(s): Herrin, Judith
Contributor(s):
Title : The Imperial Feminine in Byzantium [the author argues that Byzantine tradition provided for occasions when empresses had to assume power; this did not challenge the patriarchal order nor did it establish a fixed role for empresses; however, empresses had three sure resources (role as imperial hostess, mother of the emperor's heir, and power over the quarters, staff, and treasury of the empress) which allowed them to take an often active role in politics].
Source: Past and Present , 169., (November 2000):  Pages 3 - 35. Reproduced in Unrivalled Influence: Women and Empire in Byzantium. By Judith Herrin. Princeton University Press, 2013. Pages 161-193.
Year of Publication: 2000.

21. Record Number: 3714
Author(s): Zeitler, Barbara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ostentatio genitalium : Displays of Nudity in Byzantinum
Source: Desire and Denial in Byzantium: Papers from the Thirty-First Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, March 1997.   Edited by Liz James. Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies, Publications 6 .   Variorum (Ashgate Publishing), 1999. Byzantion , 69., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 185 - 201.
Year of Publication: 1999.

22. Record Number: 3775
Author(s): Havice, Christine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Approaching Medieval Women Through Medieval Art [the author provides an introductory overview touching on the images of medieval women (legendary and historical figures) in art and the roles that women played in the production of art, including recipients, sponsors, authors, and artists].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999. Byzantion , 69., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 345 - 389.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 5142
Author(s): Thomas, Anabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Moving on from Joan Kelly Gadol [The author considers six recent books about women and Renaissance art, of which three deal with the Middle Ages ("Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy," "Women in Italian Renaissance Art," and "Renaissance Women Patrons"].
Source: Oxford Art Journal (Full Text via JSTOR) 22, 2 (1999): 144-153. Louise Bourgeois. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

24. Record Number: 4750
Author(s): Connor, Carolyn L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Documents: The Epigram in the Church of Hagios Polyeuktos in Constantinople and Its Byzantine Response [the author argues that Anicia Juliana herself may have composed the seventy-six line epigram that was inscribed inside and outside her magnificent church; later building inscriptions as well as books reacted to her family pride, sumptuous descriptions, and learned rhetoric that was reflected in her influential encomium/dedication; the appendices include a transcription of the Greek epigram that was inscribed in Hagios Polyeuktos; an English translation of the epigram; the Greek epigrams that were inscribed in the church of Saint Euphemia, a church that Juliana refurbished; a transcription of the Greek epigram from the Vienna Dioscurides manuscript (cod. med. gr. 1, fol. 6 verso) which forms an acrostic on Juliana's name; a transcription of the Greek epigram on the frieze of the church of Saints Sergius and Bacchus built by Justin and Theodora shortly after Hagios Polyeuktos].
Source: Byzantion , 69., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 479 - 527.
Year of Publication: 1999.

25. Record Number: 11863
Author(s): Morgan, Nigel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Texts and Images of Marian Devotion in English Twelfth-Century Monasticism and Their Influence on the Secular Church [The author briefly discusses surviving evidence, mostly from male Benedictine houses, which involves both devotional and theological material including liturgy, prayers, miracles, exempla, and controversial works, particularly concerning the Conception of the Virgin. Imags of Mary rely on intellectual and theological symbolism rather than on the humanized and affective portrayals that became popular in the thirteenth century. Common motifs include the Virgin as Ecclesia, Wisdom, Bride of Christ, and a crowned queen. Both images and texts were transmitted to the secular world. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Monasteries and society in medieval Britain: proceedings of the 1994 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by Benjamin Thompson Harlaxton medieval studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1999. Byzantion , 69., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 117 - 136.
Year of Publication: 1999.

26. Record Number: 2068
Author(s): Sydie, R.A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Phallocentric Gaze: Leon Battista Alberti and Visual Art
Source: Journal of Historical Sociology , 10., 3 (September 1997):  Pages 310 - 341.
Year of Publication: 1997.

27. Record Number: 754
Author(s): Frugoni, Chiara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Mystics, Visions, and Iconography [mystics' uses of images and their affective relationship with a more humanized deity].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval and Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Daniel Bornstein and Roberto Rusconi. Trans. by Margery J. Schneider .   University of Chicago Press, 1996.  Pages 130 - 164. Originally published as "Le mistiche, le visioni e l'iconografia: rapporti ed influssi'" in Mistiche e devote nell'Italia tardomedievale. Edited by Daniel Bornstein and Roberto Rusconi (Liguori Editore, 1992). Pages 127-155.
Year of Publication: 1996.

28. Record Number: 815
Author(s): Anderson, Jaynie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rewriting the History of Art Patronage [women as patrons of art].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 2 (June 1996):  Pages 129 - 138.
Year of Publication: 1996.

29. Record Number: 2515
Author(s): Halpin, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anglo-Saxon Women and Pilgrimage [discusses trips to the Continent, to English shrines, and pilgrimages of the "heart" through devotional texts and art; includes a brief analysis of four devotional objects, a crucifix, two manuscript illuminations, and an embroidered alb, that were commissioned by women].
Source: Anglo-Norman Studies , 19., ( 1996):  Pages 97 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1996.

30. Record Number: 5507
Author(s): McGuire, Thérèse.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Aesthetic Principles in the Works of Hildegard of Bingen
Source: Wisdom Which Encircles Circles: Papers on Hildegard of Bingen.   Edited by Audrey Ekdahl Davidson .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1996. Anglo-Norman Studies , 19., ( 1996):  Pages 71 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1996.

31. Record Number: 1097
Author(s): Betcher, Gloria J.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Tempting Theory: What Early Cornish Mermaid Images Reveal about the First Doctor's Analogy in "Passio Domini" [traditional representation of mermaids as temptresses in Cornish church bench-ends and wall paintings is reconciled with the play's use of the mermaid to symbolize the dual nature of Jesus Christ].
Source: Early Drama, Art, and Music Review , 18., 2 (Spring 1996):  Pages 65 - 76.
Year of Publication: 1996.

32. Record Number: 819
Author(s): Tolley, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : States of Independence: Women Regents as Patrons of the Visual Arts in Renaissance France
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 2 (June 1996):  Pages 237 - 258.
Year of Publication: 1996.

33. Record Number: 795
Author(s): Cheney, Liana De Girolami.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cult of Saint Agatha [Discusses the trial of St. Agatha, the pornographic violence of her martydom in late medieval drama and art, and Giulio Campi's sixteenth century Fresco cycle].
Source: Woman's Art Journal (Full Text via JSTOR) 17, 1 (Spring/Summer 1996): 3-9. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

34. Record Number: 258
Author(s): Whitaker, Muriel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Artists' Ideal Griselda
Source: Sovereign Lady: Essays on Women in Middle English Literature.   Edited by Muriel Whitaker .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Studies in Iconography , 14., ( 1995):  Pages 85 - 114.
Year of Publication: 1995.

35. Record Number: 233
Author(s): Biscoglio, Frances M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Unspun Heroes: Iconography of the Spinning Woman in the Middle Ages
Source: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 25., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 163 - 176.
Year of Publication: 1995.

36. Record Number: 4684
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women as Patrons: Nuns, Widows, and Rulers
Source: Siena, Florence, and Padua: Art, Society, and Religion, 1280-1400. Volume II: Case Studies.   Edited by Diana Norman .   Yale University Press in association with The Open University, 1995. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 25., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 242 - 266.
Year of Publication: 1995.

37. Record Number: 32
Author(s): Flint, Valerie I. J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Susanna and the Lothar Crystal: A Liturgical Perspective
Source: Early Medieval Europe , 4., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 61 - 86.
Year of Publication: 1995.

38. Record Number: 1123
Author(s): Kamerick, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Art and Moral Vision in Angela of Foligno and Margery Kempe [compares their reactions to sacred art with the ideas in "De oculo morali"].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 21., 4 (December 1995):  Pages 148 - 158.
Year of Publication: 1995.

39. Record Number: 515
Author(s): Havice, Christine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Production of Art in the Middle Ages: The Significance of Context [women as artists, sponsors, and authors].
Source: Double Vision: Perspectives on Gender and the Visual Arts.   Edited by Natalie Harris Bluestone .   Associated University Presses, 1995. Mystics Quarterly , 21., 4 (December 1995):  Pages 67 - 94.
Year of Publication: 1995.

40. Record Number: 2694
Author(s): Schiferl, Ellen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Caritas and the Iconography of Italian Confraternity Art [explores the iconography of the Madonna della Misericordia, the Madonna of Humility, and the Flagellation of Christ within the lay context of the confraternity where the themes of charity, humility, and mercy were expressed by love for one's neighbor, love for God, and the hope of salvation; also includes an appendix that lists Italian confraternity art, both sculpture and painting, for each of the three themes, 1300-1515].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 14., ( 1995):  Pages 207 - 246.
Year of Publication: 1995.

41. Record Number: 5569
Author(s): Duclow, Donald F.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin's "Good Death": The Dormition in Fifteenth-Century Drama and Art [The author argues that the Virgin's dormition served as a model for dying well; handbooks in the "ars moriendi" tradition also emphasize a serene, holy death with the consoling intervention of the Virgin Mary].
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 21., ( 1994):  Pages 55 - 86.
Year of Publication: 1994.

42. Record Number: 11659
Author(s): Teixeira, Madalena Braz.
Contributor(s):
Title : Portuguese Art Treasures, Medieval Women and Early Museum Collections [The author briefly explores the early history of art collecting in Portugal. Royal and noble women founded and supported monasteries with gifts of jewels, paintings, liturgical objects, and other artwork. Some of these treasures are still on view in museums and libraries in Portugal. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Museums and the Making of "Ourselves": The Role of Objects in National Identity.   Edited by Flora E. S. Kaplan .   Leicester University Press, 1994. Fifteenth Century Studies , 21., ( 1994):  Pages 291 - 313.
Year of Publication: 1994.

43. Record Number: 14249
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie, l'art el la société [confrence announced for 1993 dedicated to the topic of the Virgin Mary, art and society].
Source: Revue d'Histoire de l'Église de France , 79., 202 (janvier-juin 1993):  Pages 227
Year of Publication: 1993.

44. Record Number: 10224
Author(s): Cassidy, Brendan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Orcagna’s Tabernacle in Florence: Design and Function [In the mid-fourteenth century, Andrea Orcagna was commissioned to design a new shrine to house an image of the Madonna in the Church of Orsanmichele in Florence. The author describes the original appearance of the shrine and the devotional purposes it served, as well as the shrine’s relationship to an earlier tabernacle that stood in Orsanmichele. The shrine provided a focus for devotion to the Virgin, and although it was not originally designed for celebration of the Mass, it was at some point converted to include an altar for that purpose. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 180 - 211.
Year of Publication: 1992.

45. Record Number: 10225
Author(s): King, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval and Renaissance Matrons, Italian-style [Women were able to commission art and architecture in fourteenth and fifteenth century Italy in a variety of ways, even if their involvement in the production of images and construction of buildings wasn’t as widespread as men’s. For instance, wealthy widows could control the making of large, public images such as funerary altarpieces, while nuns could commission artwork and buildings through convent endowments. Through their acts of patronage, these “matrons” challenged conventional expectations that women inhabit a small, private sphere. The author also analyzes how women chose to represent themselves visually within the works they commissioned. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 372 - 393.
Year of Publication: 1992.

46. Record Number: 10366
Author(s): Bernstein, Joanne G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Female Model and the Renaissance Nude: Durer, Giorgione, and Raphael
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 13., 26 ( 1992):  Pages 49 - 63.
Year of Publication: 1992.

47. Record Number: 10298
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Art, Enclosure and the "Cura Monialium": Prolegomena in the Guise of a Postscript [The author addresses the question of female spirituality in the Middle Ages by looking both at monastic architecture and female patronage within the visual arts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 108-134. Link InfoReprinted in The Visual and the Visionary: Art and Female Spirituality in Late Medieval Germany. By Jeffrey F. Hamburger. Zone Books, 1998. Pages 35-109.
Year of Publication: 1992.

48. Record Number: 10522
Author(s): Frugoni, Chiara.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Imagined Woman [The author provides an overview of visual representations of women in the medieval Christian West. Women were represented in a variety of art forms (including manuscripts, paintings, frescos, and sculptures). These images of women reflected perceived expectations of their roles (as virgins, wives, or widows) and reinforced Church doctrine on the sexual regulation of women, women’s roles within marriage, and women’s perceived duties within the domestic and religious spheres. The author argues that most of these representations are misogynistic; although women sometimes appear as saints (like the Virgin Mary) they often take the form of sinners and temptresses (like Eve). The author also examines how the visual arts use women as personifications of virtues and vices or other abstract concepts. In addition, the author argues that images provide insights into women’s private and daily lives, as well as the nature of women’s literacy and the variety of their occupations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992.  Pages 336 - 422.
Year of Publication: 1992.

49. Record Number: 10734
Author(s): Bynum, Caroline Walker.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Body of Christ in the Later Middle Ages: A Reply to Leo Steinberg [The author argues against Steinberg’s notion that Renaissance painters focused on Christ’s penis in order to make a theological statement about sexuality; she suggests instead that fifteenth-century artists show Jesus as both male and female, and saw his as a generative body. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Human Body in Medieval Religion. Caroline Walker Bynum .   MIT Press, 1991. Renaissance Quarterly , 44., 4 (Winter 1991):  Pages 79 - 118.
Year of Publication: 1991.

50. Record Number: 11069
Author(s): Camille, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gothic Signs and the Surplus: The Kiss on the Cathedral [The kiss was a sign with many meanings, and its symbolic significance in medieval visual and verbal representations is manifold. A sculpture on the West Front of Amiens Cathedral depicts the sin of lechery through the image of a man and woman kissing, yet the kiss did not always stand in for representations of sexual intercourse (legitimate or illicit). The kiss could have spiritual and allegorical significance (e.g., visual representations of the Song of Songs), legal force (e.g., feudal and courtly rituals), treacherous or transgressive overtones (e.g., representations of Judas and Christ or other same-sex couples kissing), mystical meanings, or devotional purposes (e.g., the kiss of peace). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 151-170. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

51. Record Number: 11798
Author(s): Ciletti, Elena.
Contributor(s):
Title : Patriarchal Ideology in the Renaissance Iconography of Judith [The author suggests that, in the medieval and Renaissance periods, artists and interpreters alike used Judith to produce the patriarchal categories of chastity and sexual license. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Refiguring Woman: Perspectives on Gender and the Italian Renaissance.   Edited by Marilyn Migiel and Juliana Schiesari .   Cornell University Press, 1991. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 35 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1991.

52. Record Number: 10993
Author(s): Morgan, Nigel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Texts and Images of Marian Devotion in Thirteenth-Century England [Many lay practices focused on the Virgin Mary developed in the thirteenth century. They required a basic knowledge of Latin to read books of hours. Many of the most popular ideas, such as Mary the intercessor, were found in art. Much of thirteenth century Marian art from England has been lost; but illuminated manuscripts employ the most common motifs, including Mary pleading bare-breasted for sinful humanity. The Appendix presents Middle English language texts of Marian antiphons, hymns, and prayers of the Sarum Hours from an early fifteenth century manuscript of "The Prymer or Lay Folks' Prayer Book." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: England in the Thirteenth Century: Proceedings of the 1989 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by W.M. Ormrod Harlaxton Medieval Studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1991. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 69 - 103.
Year of Publication: 1991.

53. Record Number: 10893
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Marian Politics in Quattrocento Florence: The Renewed Dedication of Santa Maria del Fiore in 1412 [The author argues that the political leaders of Florence chose in 1412 to identify the state with the Virgin Mary in the rededication of the cathedral to "Santa Maria del Fiore." The lily symbolized not only Mary's purity but also the city of Florence. M
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 44., 4 (Winter 1991):  Pages 673 - 719.
Year of Publication: 1991.

54. Record Number: 10995
Author(s): Tolley, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eleanor of Castile and the "Spanish" Style in England [The author describes Eleanor of Castile's interests in culture and the decorative arts. Tolley also discusses the artistic traditions that Eleanor knew in Spain including rich textiles and elaborate decorative patterns. Tolley suggests that under Eleanor's influence Spanish styles and techniques were introduced into England including the Eleanor Crosses that Edward I set up to commemorate his wife. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: England in the Thirteenth Century: Proceedings of the 1989 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by W.M. Ormrod Harlaxton Medieval Studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1991. Renaissance Quarterly , 44., 4 (Winter 1991):  Pages 167 - 192.
Year of Publication: 1991.

55. Record Number: 12765
Author(s): Vikan, Gary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Art and Marriage in Early Byzantium [The author surveys the material culture of “marriage art” which survives from Byzantium, paying special attention to wedding rings and other jewelry, coins, and marriage belts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dumbarton Oaks Papers , 44., ( 1990):  Pages 145 - 163.
Year of Publication: 1990.

56. Record Number: 12747
Author(s): Emison, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Word Made Naked in Pollaiuolo's "Battle of the Nudes" [It is unknown whether Antonio Pollaiuolo's late fifteenth century engraving of nude men engaged in battle refers to a text or not. While previous depictions of nude males (such as figures of David) often relied upon an explicit or implicit textual reference and depicted the youthful male as the ideal of masculine beauty, Pollaiulo's engraving does not clearly invoke any text and offers a virile, adult ideal for the male nude. Interpretations of the engraving have varied, as some of the items throughout the image (such as weapons and chains) could have allegorical significance if they are interpreted as iconography. The author suggests that works of art produced during Pollaiuolo's time that feature nudes, which some have tried to interpret as depicting certain classical myths, epics, or moments in history, may communicate as images without reference to any text. Artists may produce works of art for purely formal or aesthetic reasons with no subject or text in mind. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Art History , 13., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 261 - 275.
Year of Publication: 1990.