Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


66 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 11024
Author(s): Bodden, M. C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Clerk's Tale": Interrogating "Virtue" through Violence [The author argues that the tale of Griselda should not be read as an allegory of humanity's relationship to God but as Chaucer's critique of hagiography's docile, virtuous heroines. Bodden cites the Envoy as clear evidence of Chaucer's condemnation of violence and in particular the torture of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Great Effusion of Blood? Interpreting Medieval Violence.   Edited by Mark D. Meyerson, Daniel Thiery, and Oren Falk .   University of Toronto Press, 2004.  Pages 216 - 240.
Year of Publication: 2004.

2. Record Number: 10933
Author(s): Osborn, Marijane
Contributor(s):
Title : Authorship and Sexual/Allegorical Violence in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose" [The author argues that while Jean de Meun's "Rose" calls attention to authorship and authority, it supports the privileges of patriarchy and the subordination of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 628 - 659.
Year of Publication: 2004.

3. Record Number: 12611
Author(s): Denny-Brown, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : How Philosophy Matters: Death, Sex, Clothes, and Boethius [Lady Philosophy’s garment has an important symbolic significance, yet Boethius still depicts it as a material object. The materiality of Philosophy’s garment unsettles her supposed status as a purely immaterial abstraction. The corporeal status of her sexually-violated body and the gaps in her garment align her with the Muses of Poetry, negating a perception of Philosophy as pure, perfect, or whole. Her imperfect garment and female body thus symbolize human loss, corruption and mortality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 177 - 191.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 12612
Author(s): Kay, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Flayed Skin as "objet a": Representation and Materiality in Guillaume de Deguileville’s "Pelerinage de vie humaine" [Allusions to flaying and stripping human flesh abound in Guillaume’s didactic allegory, which features female personifications embodying various abstractions. In the case of the Deadly Sins, flaying skin is linked to bodily punishment; in the case of Virtues, flayed skin alludes to Scripture and written documents (manuscripts being written on parchment, or flayed animal skin). Although Guillaume’s flaying theme presents skin as in some ways pointing towards a sublime immortality, the materiality of skin also represents the mortality of the body. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 193 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 10985
Author(s): McGinley, Kevin J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Fenzeit" and the Feminine: Robert Henryson's "Orpheus and Eurydice" and the Gendering of Poetry [The author argues that the narrative in the poem is associated with the feminine while the concluding "moralitas" is identified as masculine. McGinley suggests that in this way the poet calls into question the traditional patriarchal values and presents the feminine more positively. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing.   Edited by Sarah M. Dunnigan, C. Marie Harker, and Evelyn S. Newlyn .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 74 - 85.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 10853
Author(s): Keen, Catherine M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the Medieval City: Viewing the Body Politic from Exile in Early Italian Verse [Keen examines poems by four authors in exile (Dante, Cino da Pistoia, Pietro dei Faitinelli, and Niccolò del Rosso) in which the natal city is depicted as a beautiful woman; sometimes she is to be pitied, but other times she is hateful. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 155 - 171.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 7904
Author(s): Amsler, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rape and Silence: Ovid's Mythography and Medieval Readers
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 61 - 96.
Year of Publication: 2001.

8. Record Number: 4610
Author(s): Moore, Stephen D.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Song of Songs" in the History of Sexuality [The author argues that medieval commentators read the "Song of Songs" as an allegory about the celibate male as the Bride who unites with Christ as the Bridegroom].
Source: Church History , 69., 2 (June 2000):  Pages 328 - 349.
Year of Publication: 2000.

9. Record Number: 5461
Author(s): Whitehead, Christiania.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fortress and a Shield: The Representation of the Virgin in the "Château d'amour" of Robert Grosseteste
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000. Church History , 69., 2 (June 2000):  Pages 109 - 132.
Year of Publication: 2000.

10. Record Number: 5863
Author(s): Kienzle, Beverly Mayne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hildegard of Bingen's Teaching in Her "Expositiones evangeliorum" and "Ordo virtutum" [The author focuses on the variety of exegetical interpretations Hildegard offers in the "Expositiones"].
Source: Medieval Monastic Education.   Edited by George Ferzoco and Carolyn Muessig .   Leicester University Press, 2000. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 72 - 86.
Year of Publication: 2000.

11. Record Number: 4779
Author(s): Jestice, Phyllis G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eternal Flame: State Formation, Deviant Architecture, and the Monumentality of Same-Sex Eroticism in the "Roman d'Eneas" ["My argument in this essay has been that in the heteronormative sexual and political economy of early Old French romance we can reclaim the disrputive effects of dialogism and desire, as well as the potentially subversive trace of the silencing of the other (a rhetorical strategy that is itself far from silent) in the historical process of state formation and in the ongoing processes of constructing national political identities." Page 310].
Source: GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 6, 2 (2000): 287-319. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2000.

12. Record Number: 8591
Author(s): Cowling, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Verbal and Visual Metaphors in the Cambridge Manuscript of the "Douze dames de rhétorique" (1463) [The text developed as an exchange of correspondence between the young, eager Jean Robertet and the respected older poet Georges Chastelain. Several of the manuscript versions include elaborate illustrations. The author explores how the artist was able to express the involved metaphors and prompt an allegorical reading of the images. The Appendix presents the text and English translations of the "enseignes" or self-descriptions of the twelve ladies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 3., ( 2000):  Pages 94 - 118.
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 4715
Author(s): Parra-Pirela, Carlos Hugo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Preaching by Hildegard and Aelred on the Purification of Mary [though their methods and gender emphases differed, both Hildegard and Aelred delivered a moral message to their listeners with an eschatological emphasis; the author includes a parallel chronology for Hildegard and Aelred as well as a comparison of the textual parallels in Hildegard's two sermons on the Purification of Mary].
Source: Magistra , 5., 1 (Summer 1999):  Pages 43 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1999.

14. Record Number: 5336
Author(s): Brook, Leslie C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rewards and Punishments in the "De Amore" and Kindred Texts [the author analyzes an allegory in which noble women, and to a lesser extent men, were punished or rewarded according to their service to love; the author argues that the original intention may have been to frighten or cajole women into surrendering themselves to suitors].
Source: Reading Medieval Studies , 25., ( 1999):  Pages 3 - 16.
Year of Publication: 1999.

15. Record Number: 3946
Author(s): Brown, Cynthia J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Allegorical Design and Image-Making in Fifteenth Century France: Alain Chartier's Joan of Arc [The author analyzes two other texts by Chartier as well to establish the ways that he creates allegorical figures and powerful images].
Source: French Studies , 53., 4 (October 1999):  Pages 385 - 404.
Year of Publication: 1999.

16. Record Number: 3524
Author(s): Fanger, Claire.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Formative Feminine and the Immobility of God: Gender and Cosmogony in Bernard Silvestris's "Cosmographia" [The author focuses on the divine femininity of Noys and her relationship to the masculine First Being].
Source: The Tongue of the Fathers: Gender and Ideology in Twelfth-Century Latin.   Edited by David Townsend and Andrew Taylor .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. French Studies , 53., 4 (October 1999):  Pages 80 - 101.
Year of Publication: 1998.

17. Record Number: 13512
Author(s): Dronke, Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Allegorical World-Picture of Hildegard of Bingen: Revaluations and New Problems [The author explores the work of Hans Liebeschütz on Hildegard's use of allegory. He also considers the variety and difficulty of texts that Hildegard draws on or echoes in her works. The article concludes with the Latin text and English translation of an unpublished, allegorical letter from Hildegard, Berlin Lat. Qu. 674, ff. 39 va- 40 rb (B).].
Source: Hildegard of Bingen: The Context of Her Thought and Art.   Edited by Charles Burnett and Peter Dronke Warburg Institute Colloquia Series .   The Warburg Institute, 1998. French Studies , 53., 4 (October 1999):  Pages 1 - 16.
Year of Publication: 1998.

18. Record Number: 4160
Author(s): Vetrani, Anthony J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christian Allegory in Selected "Milagros" of Gonzalo de Berceo [The author examines the use of allegory in two "Milagros," one of which is "The Pregnant Abbess"].
Source: Journal of Hispanic Philology , 18., ( 1997):  Pages 179 - 193.
Year of Publication: 1997.

19. Record Number: 2427
Author(s): Epp, Garrett P.J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Vicious Guise: Effeminacy, Sodomy, and "Mankind"
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. French Studies , 53., 4 (October 1999):  Pages 303 - 320.
Year of Publication: 1997.

20. Record Number: 1778
Author(s): Gwara, Joseph J.
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Epithalamial Allegory by Juan de Flores: "La coronacíon de la Señora Gracisla" (1475) [argues that the text was written by Juan de Flores and staged as a puppet show for children, since it celebrated the betrothal of Leonor de Acuña (aged 6 to 10 years) and Pedro Alvarez Osorio (aged around 13 years)].
Source: Revista de Estudios Hispánicos , 30., 2 (Mayo 1996):  Pages 227 - 257.
Year of Publication: 1996.

21. Record Number: 853
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : The Scandal of Pasiphae: Narration and Interpretation in the "Ovide Moralisé"
Source: Modern Philology (Full Text via JSTOR) 93, 3 (February 1996): 307-326. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

22. Record Number: 858
Author(s): Hall, Colette.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Genealogy of an Idea: From "La Cité des Dames" to "Le Fort inexpugnable de l' honneur du sexe femenin"
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 109 - 118.
Year of Publication: 1996.

23. Record Number: 366
Author(s): Semple, Benjamin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Consolation of a Woman Writer: Christine de Pizan's Use of Boethius in "Lavision- Christine"
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. English Studies , 76., 3 (May 1995):  Pages 39 - 48.
Year of Publication: 1995.

24. Record Number: 1608
Author(s): Kottenhoff, Margarete.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Miniaturen des "Livre de la Cité des Dames" als historiche Quellen
Source: Historisches Jahrbuch , 115., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 335 - 361.
Year of Publication: 1995.

25. Record Number: 1710
Author(s): Willard, Charity Cannon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan's Allegorized Psalms [commissioned in Paris by Charles the Noble, King of Navarre, during a time of political troubles under Charles VI].
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Historisches Jahrbuch , 115., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 317 - 324.
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 1698
Author(s): Tarnowski, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : Autobiograpy and Advice in the "Livre des Trois Vertus"
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Fifteenth Century Studies , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 151 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1995.

27. Record Number: 1714
Author(s): Borgnet, Guy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le style allégorique de Christine
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Fifteenth Century Studies , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 357 - 372.
Year of Publication: 1995.

28. Record Number: 903
Author(s): Brown, Cynthia J.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Late Medieval Cultural Artifact: "The Twelve Ladies of Rhetoric" ("Les Douze Dames de Rhétorique")
Source: Allegorica , 16., ( 1995):  Pages 73 - 105.
Year of Publication: 1995.

29. Record Number: 1527
Author(s): Calvo González, José.
Contributor(s):
Title : Femme et monstre dans l'imaginaire médiéval et de la Renaissance (Analyses narratives et idéographiques d'une allégorie)
Source: La Femme dans l' histoire et la société méridionales (IXe-XIXe S.): Actes du 66e congrés. .   Fédération historique du Languedoc méditerranéen et du Roussillon, 1995. Allegorica , 16., ( 1995):  Pages 231 - 241.
Year of Publication: 1995.

30. Record Number: 453
Author(s): Heinrichs, Katherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tropological Woman in Chaucer: Literary Elaborations of an Exegetical Tradition [references to The Fall in the Canterbury Tales].
Source: English Studies , 76., 3 (May 1995):  Pages 209 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1995.

31. Record Number: 6269
Author(s): Carugati, Giuliana.
Contributor(s):
Title : Retorica amorosa e verità in Dante: il "De Causis" e l'idea della donna nel "Convivio" [Dante's loves, especially Beatrice, have been interpreted as representing philosophy; use of female abstractions is clearest in the "Convivio," which was influenced by the Pseudo-Aristotelian "Liber de Causis" with its Neoplatonic themes; the superior intelligences mentioned in the book were feminine, as was the world soul, giving Dante a philosophical context for his feelings of love; despite these feminine abstractions, actual women were conceded no such dignity].
Source: Dante Studies , 12., ( 1994):  Pages 161 - 175.
Year of Publication: 1994.

32. Record Number: 9529
Author(s): Brownlee, Kevin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Commentary and the Rhetoric of Exemplarity: Griseldis in Petrarch, Philippe de Mezieres, and the "Estoire" [The story of patient Griselda was retold throughout the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries in different languages; in each treatment of the story, authors see Griselda as an exemplary figure, but they disagree on what exactly she exemplifies. Petrarch portrays Griselda’s submission to her husband figuratively (she represents a Christian’s submission to God). For Philippe, Griselda’s story has both figurative and literal meanings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: South Atlantic Quarterly , 91., 4 (Fall 1992):  Pages 865 - 890.
Year of Publication: 1992.

33. Record Number: 10367
Author(s): Dulac, Liliane.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Representation and Functions of Feminine Speech in Christine de Pizan’s "Livre des Trois Vertus" [In this didactic text directed to female readers, Christine examines the problematic role of feminine speech in relation to male discourse. Through an analysis of Christine’s allegorical female personifications of Virtues, the author explores the social importance and resources of feminine speech in literary texts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. South Atlantic Quarterly , 91., 4 (Fall 1992):  Pages 13 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1992.

34. Record Number: 10369
Author(s): McLeod, Glenda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetics and Antimisogynist Polemics in Christine de Pizan’s "Le Livre de la Cite des Dames" [The author explores the central role of morality and ethics in Christine’s work. The “Livre” is a work of generic and allegorical sophistication. In this text, Christine adapts some of the structures and rhetorical conventions of scholasticism in order to attack literary misogyny. The author compares the literary strategies used in Christine’s work to the allegorical procedures used by scholastic thinkers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. South Atlantic Quarterly , 91., 4 (Fall 1992):  Pages 37 - 47.
Year of Publication: 1992.

35. Record Number: 10374
Author(s): Beer, Jeanette M. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Stylistic Conventions in "Le Livre de la mutacion de Fortune" [In her allegorical poem, Christine uses rhetorical devices (particularly “dilatio,” “amplificatio,” and “abbreviatio”) in order to construct her relationship with her readers. While she does use some tropes that male poets use, Christine disassociates herself from particular tropes used in Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose” and Guillaume Machaut’s “Livre de Voir-Dit.” The author also argues that Christine is unable to integrate the question of Jewish history into the larger historical vision of the work. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. South Atlantic Quarterly , 91., 4 (Fall 1992):  Pages 124 - 136.
Year of Publication: 1992.

36. Record Number: 10379
Author(s): Reno, Christine.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Preface to the “Avision-Christine” in ex-Phillips 128 [Reno provides a transcription and translation of the Preface to the “Avision-Christine” as it appears in a previously unpublished manuscript. The preface explains to the reader how to read Christine de Pizan’s allegorical poem. Reno explains Christine’s ties to the allegorical exegetical tradition and to Boccaccio’s poetry, concluding that Christine blended Italian humanism and French courtly traditions in her writings. She concludes that Christine must have read some of Boccaccio’s work in the original Latin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. South Atlantic Quarterly , 91., 4 (Fall 1992):  Pages 207 - 227.
Year of Publication: 1992.

37. Record Number: 10296
Author(s): Rigaux, Dominique.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Franciscan tertiaries at the convent of Sant'Anna at Foligno [The author considers a series of late-fourteenth-century and fifteenth-century "meal scene" frescoes as documents of Franciscan spirituality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 92-98. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

38. Record Number: 8582
Author(s): Dulac, Liliane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mystical Inspiration and Political Knowledge: Advice to Widows from Francesco da Barberino and Christine de Pizan [The author considers two literary works in which advice is given to widows. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Upon My Husband's Death: Widows in the Literature and Histories of Medieval Europe.   Edited by Louise Mirrer Studies in Medieval and Early Modern Civilization .   University of Michigan Press, 1992.  Pages 223 - 258.
Year of Publication: 1992.

39. Record Number: 9545
Author(s): Favier, Dale A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anelida and Arcite: Anti-Feminist Allegory, Pro-Feminist Complaint [The author argues that a pro-feminist impulse in Chaucer’s early poem “Anelida and Arcite” conflicts with the anti-feminist (misogynist) allegorical tradition upon which it borrows. In this tradition, poetry’s betrayal of literal meaning reflects men’s betrayal of women. Anelida’s complaint against Arcite (as well as the poet’s negative portrayal of Mars and Theseus) challenge this anti-feminist literary tradition. Chaucer’s interest in female-voiced complaint carries over into much of his later work. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 26., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 83 - 94.
Year of Publication: 1991.

40. Record Number: 11218
Author(s): Carlson, Paula J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lady Meed and God’s Meed: The Grammar of 'Piers Plowman' B 3 and C 4 [In revising his poem, William Langland expands a passage (in what is known as the B-text) into a longer passage (in what is known as the C-text) that describes the debate between Conscience and Lady Meed. Much of modern readers’ confusion about the meaning of the C-text passage lies in the misleading punctuation in W. W. Skeat’s printed edition of the poem. The editor’s punctuation choices obscure the sustained grammatical metaphor Langland uses in the revised C-text. In this new passage, the relationship between nouns and adjectives are meant to describe (by way of analogy) the relationship between God and humanity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 46., ( 1991):  Pages 291 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1991.

41. Record Number: 11066
Author(s): Brownlee, Kevin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Image of History in Christine de Pizan’s "Livre de la Mutacion de Fortune" [Christine creates a double representation of history in this poem. In addition to relating all the great events in human history, she also presents a personal history in the form of an allegorical autobiography. This narrative fictionalizes her own development into the author of the book, as Christine presents her past self reading a sequence of wall paintings. As she narrates these images, Christine establishes her unique authority as a female poet of history, differentiating herself from the male wall-reading protagonists of the Aeneid, Roman de le Rose, the Prose Lancelot, and Dante’s Divine Comedy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 44-56. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

42. Record Number: 11067
Author(s): Hicks, Eric.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Le Livre des Trois Vertus” of Christine de Pizan: Beinecke MS. 427 [Christine exerted a large degree of control over the production and transmission of her writings. Although it is unknown whether any existing manuscript of Christine’s work is written in her own handwriting, Christine did act as both author and editor of manuscripts containing her own poetry. The paintings in Beinecke MS. 427 suggest that Christine also oversaw the illumination of her manuscripts, as the representation of allegorical figures in this volume follow the text of the poem more closely than the illustrations in other manuscripts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 57-71. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

43. Record Number: 11217
Author(s): Twomey, Michael W.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christ’s Leap and Mary’s Clean Catch in “Piers Plowman” B.12.136-44a and C.14.81-88a [In his allegorical poem, William Langland combines conventional images of Christ and Mary in order to represent how Christ’s love and Mary’s purity played a key role in the foundation of the Church. The poet achieves this effect through poetic devices, including allusion and metaphor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 5., ( 1991):  Pages 165 - 174.
Year of Publication: 1991.

44. Record Number: 11817
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Cantigas d'escarnho and "serranillas": The Allegory of Careless Love [Sexually explicit texts that parodied literary works of courtly poets (like Bernart de Ventadorn) or obscene poems that satirized medical texts could serve legitimate purposes. Obscene literature participated in an interpretive network alongside other types of texts. Whether directly or indirectly (through allegory, allusion, or double entendre), these texts commented upon or critiqued the themes of more prestigious genres like courtly literature. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies , 68., 2 (April 1991):  Pages 247 - 263.
Year of Publication: 1991.

45. Record Number: 11216
Author(s): Cooper, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Personification in "Piers Plowman" [Although most allegorical writings associate personifications with femininity (abstract nouns often being grammatically feminine in Latin and Romance languages), Langland’s Middle English poem genders personifications based on what attribute they are intended to represent, sometimes representing them as male and sometimes as female. The Seven Deadly Sins, for instance, are not personified as abstract concepts but are exemplified in the behavior of representative individuals (both men and women). Rather than seeing various figures in the poem as allegorical, medieval rhetoricians would claim they are metonyms (parts or attributes representing the larger whole). Thus male figures in the poem can be read as representing particular aspects of the (male) poet’s self. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 5., ( 1991):  Pages 31 - 48.
Year of Publication: 1991.

46. Record Number: 11193
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and the Misogynistic Tradition [In her poetry, Christine de Pizan refutes the misogynist literary tradition exemplified by such texts as the Roman de la Rose. She confronts misogyny on three fronts: reason, experience, and writing. In her allegorical poems, Lady Reason encourages the author to reconsider common notions about women. The poet’s own experience allows her to give many counter examples to misogynist texts. Most importantly, Christine’s scholarly acts of reading and writing generate numerous examples of feminine virtue from books that previous writers have ignored. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Pages 297-311. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 279 - 292. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Translated by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski and Kevin Brownlee. W. W. Norton & Company, 1997. Pages 297-311.
Year of Publication: 1990.

47. Record Number: 12700
Author(s): Fabianski, Marcin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Federigo da Montefeltro's "Studiolo" in Gubbio Reconsidered. Its Decoration and Its Iconographic Program: An Interpretation [The series of painted panels in a duke's study, attributed to fifteenth century painter Joos van Gent (also known as Justus of Ghent or Giusto da Guanto), depict men kneeling before female personifications of the Liberal Arts. Although the exact attribution, purpose, or arrangement of the panels is unknown, the author suggests a team of artists was instructed to follow a program of iconography of the Arts and Virtues, with revisions to the program (including the inclusion of a duke's likeness and an oration scene) made at the request of the patron. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 11., 22 ( 1990):  Pages 199 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1990.

48. Record Number: 11213
Author(s): Crockett, Bryan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Venus Unveiled: Lydgate’s “Temple of Glas” and the Religion of Love [Although Lydgate’s allegorical poem strikes modern readers as long-winded and boring, it is actually an interesting ironic treatment of frustrated love that achieves its effect by reworking literary influences (especially Chaucer’s dream visions). While the poem appears to be a straightforward praise of Venus and erotic love, numerous Classical references and allusions to inconstant women run throughout the work. Thus, Lydgate actually believes that trusting in erotic love (and women in general) leads to disaster. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mediaevalia , 14., ( 1988):  Pages 201 - 230. 1991 (for 1988)
Year of Publication: 1988.

49. Record Number: 28573
Author(s):
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Title : Allegory of August with Three Decans
Source: Mediaevalia , 14., ( 1988):
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50. Record Number: 28726
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Fortune's Wheel
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/ForutuneWheel.jpg/250px-ForutuneWheel.jpg
Year of Publication:

51. Record Number: 28733
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman with a Pink
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Hans_Memling_050.jpg/250px-Hans_Memling_050.jpg
Year of Publication:

52. Record Number: 28748
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Three Decans of March
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Marzo,_francesco_del_cossa,_14.jpg/250px-Marzo,_francesco_del_cossa,_14.jpg
Year of Publication:

53. Record Number: 28769
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Allegorical Harvesting Scene
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Mittelrheinischer_Meister_des_13._Jahrhunderts_001.jpg/250px-Mittelrheinischer_Meister_des_13._Jahrhunderts_001.jpg
Year of Publication:

54. Record Number: 28950
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Effects of Good Government (detail)
Source:
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55. Record Number: 31215
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Ladder of Virtue
Source:
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56. Record Number: 31500
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Claudia Quinta
Source:
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57. Record Number: 31657
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Humility Presenting Hope with the Severed Head of Pride
Source:
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58. Record Number: 31686
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Nature Forging a Baby, from the Roman de la Rose
Source:
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59. Record Number: 31687
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Crowning of Heinrich II and Kunigunde, from the Pericopes of Henry II
Source:
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60. Record Number: 31688
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Lust and Despair
Source:
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61. Record Number: 31689
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Fortune Turning her Wheel, from the Moralia in Job
Source:
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62. Record Number: 31729
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Virgo
Source:
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63. Record Number: 32269
Author(s):
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Title : Beavers
Source:
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64. Record Number: 32299
Author(s):
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Title : The Whore of Babylon Seated on the Waters
Source:
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65. Record Number: 35185
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Soul Entrusts her Heart to the Fear of God and to Contrition
Source:
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66. Record Number: 39179
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Flag of the City of Ghent
Source:
Year of Publication: