Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


36 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 27565
Author(s): Garver, Valerie L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Weaving Words in Silk: Women and Inscribed Bands in the Carolingian World [The author analyzes three silk woven bands surviving from Carolingian Germany: Witgar’s belt, Ailbecunda band, and the Speyer band. Witgar’s belt was a gift from Emma, wife of King Louis the German, to Witgar, the future bishop of Augsburg. In these three cases women not only donated high-status silk inscribed bands, but evidence also points to women as weavers of the tablet bands. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 33 - 56.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 27567
Author(s): Sayers, William
Contributor(s):
Title : Flax and Linen in Walter of Bibbesworth’s Thirteenth-Century French Treatise for English Housewives [Walter of Bibbesworth wrote a handbook for English-speaking landowners giving the French terminology for estate management. The reader he addressed was the “mesuer,” or“housewif,” who oversaw many of the processes detailed in his book. Sayers analyzes the section on growing and harvesting flax, processing and spinning the thread, and weaving linen. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 111 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2010.

3. Record Number: 16280
Author(s): Burns, E. Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saracen Silk and the Virgin's "Chemise": Cultural Crossings in Cloth [The article explores the meanings attached to a relic at Chartres, an undergartment belonging to the Virgin. Burns traces connections from the imagined Western linen "chemise" to Islamic silks and Byzantine cuts of clothing. She concludes by arguing that in this way Chartres became more "Saracen." Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 365 - 397.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 11452
Author(s): Hyer, Maren Clegg.
Contributor(s):
Title : Textiles and Textile Imagery in the "Exeter Book" [The author briefly explores three kinds of textile imagery in the tenth century "Exeter Book" manuscript: textile and textile production metaphors for fate, peacemaking, and illicit sexual activity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 29 - 39.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 11456
Author(s): Tilghman, Carla.
Contributor(s):
Title : Giovanna Cenami's Veil: A Neglected Detail [The author analyzes the woman's veil in Van Eyck's "Wedding of Arnolfini." Evidence in other artworks suggests that this ruffled veil had its heyday in the mid-to-late fourteenth century. In 1434 Van Eyck may have used the old fashioned veil to signal a ceremonial occasion in which the betrothed young woman by her headress and clothing conveyed dignity and a prosperous social status. Tilghman wove some linen samples to determine the best methods for making ruffled edges. The veil would have had to be a single length without seams approximately six yards long. It would probably have been a specialty item and would have been costly. Tilghman speculates that it might have been a family treasure passed down to Giovanna Cenami. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 155 - 172.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 11455
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Threads Bared: Dress and Textiles in Late Medieval English Wills [The author analyzes 550 wills from London and Canterbury dating from 1327 to 1487. the majority are from artisans and merchants with 16.5% made by women. Women tended to bequeath more items than men, especially clothing and household textiles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 133 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2005.

7. Record Number: 12610
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Material and Symbolic Gift-Giving: Clothes in English and French Wills [The practice of bequeathing clothing to friends, relatives, and others in one’s will was common in late medieval and Early Modern England and France. Major differences in how clothing is dispensed in the wills arise not when one compares the gender of particular testators but the socioeconomic class of the individual. Among lower class people, items of clothing function as commodities (objects of use or value to be passed along), but for bourgeois and aristocratic people clothing carries both material and symbolic value. In these social classes, giving clothing can signify a sentimental attachment to a person or it can constitute a spiritual act of almsgiving. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 137 - 146.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 12608
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : “This Skill in a Woman is By No Means to Be Despised”: Weaving and the Gender Division of Labor in the Middle Ages [Throughout the Middle Ages, cloth production was a respectable and even prestigious occupation for women. Women’s work was often devalued in comparison to that of men, but cloth production had great cultural importance. While women involved in other professions (like brewsters) came to be perceived negatively as their participation in urban and commercial life increased, the respectability of women weavers endured. Men eventually assumed control over the commercial production and trade of cloth in the later Middle Ages, yet the idea of women’s weaving remained an important concept in literary texts and in society as a whole. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 89 - 104.
Year of Publication: 2004.

9. Record Number: 12605
Author(s): Burns, Jane E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Textiles Make a Difference [Dress, textiles, and cloth production are emerging as important categories of analysis in medieval studies. While investigating textiles and representations thereof (in literary, historical, legal, and religious texts), medievalists cross disciplinary boundaries in order to examine how the personal and cultural realms interact. Social theorists, feminists, and scholars of material culture can all contribute to our understandings of how goods and objects take upon new meanings for men and women in different social contexts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2004.

10. Record Number: 6613
Author(s): Sekules, Veronica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spinning Yarns: Clean Linen and Domestic Values in Late Medieval French Culture [the author argues that linen was an important responsibility for the housewife, whether bourgeois or aristocratic; linen was associated with cleanliness, health, and domestic ease; the author uses as evidence the household inventory of Jeanne de Chastel (1347), widow of Raoul de Presles, clerk to the king, and the inventory of Marguerite de Rohan (1497), countess of Angoulême].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 79 - 91.
Year of Publication: 2002.

11. Record Number: 6256
Author(s): Halpin, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Piety. Part Three of Court and Piety in Late Anglo-Saxon England by Mary Frances Smith, Robin Fleming, and Patricia Halpin [the author focuses on the often rich material goods, sometimes of their own making, that women gave to the Church, including embroideries, woven cloth, ecclesiastical vestments, crucifixes, books, and jewelry; the author argues that women in general were concerned with encouraging a private, personal spirituality and had more control over the dispersal of their material goods than their land].
Source: Catholic Historical Review (Full Text via Project Muse) 87, 4 (October 2001): 588-602. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

12. Record Number: 5721
Author(s): Landini, Roberta Orsi and Mary Westerman Bulgarella
Contributor(s):
Title : Costume in Fifteenth-Century Florentine Portraits of Women
Source: Virtue and Beauty: Leonardo's "Ginevra de'Benci" and Renaissance Portraits of Women." Catalog of an exhibition held Sept. 30, 2001-Jan. 6, 2002 at the National Gallery of Art.   Edited by David Alan Brown et al.; with contributions by Elizabeth Cropper and Eleonora Luciano. .   National Gallery of Art in association with Princeton University Press, 2001. Speculum , 81., 2 (April 2006):  Pages 88 - 97.
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 4637
Author(s): Gibbons, Rachel C.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Queen as "Social Mannequin." Consumerism and Expenditure at the Court of Isabeau of Bavaria, 1393- 1422
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 26., 4 (December 2000):  Pages 371 - 395.
Year of Publication: 2000.

14. Record Number: 7169
Author(s): Muzzarelli, Maria Giuseppina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seta posseduta et seta consentita: dalle aspirazioni individuali alle norme suntuarie nel basso medioevo [Regulation of the use of silk, like all sumptuary norms, reinforced social distinctions, preventing people from posing as members of a higher social class. Not just wearing silk, but wearing different types of the fabric was regulated. Regulation differed by sex and by the status of a woman's husband or father. Silk, however, though regulated, was not the greatest concern of the Italian legislators. Nevertheless it does appear frequently in dowries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: La seta in Italia dal Medioevo al Seicento. Dal baco al drappo.   Edited by Luca Molà, Reinhold C. Mueller, and Claudio Zanier .   Marsilio, 2000. Journal of Medieval History , 26., 4 (December 2000):  Pages 211 - 232.
Year of Publication: 2000.

15. Record Number: 10113
Author(s): Wickham-Crowley, Kelley M
Contributor(s):
Title : Buried Truth: Shrouds and Female Production
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the Thirty-Fifth International Congress on Medieval Studies, The Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 2000, Eighteenth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo-Saxon Culture
Year of Publication: 2000.

16. Record Number: 7364
Author(s): Devroey, Jean-Pierre.
Contributor(s):
Title : Femmes au mirroir des polyptyques: une approche des rapports du couple dans l'exploitation rurale dépendante entre Seine et Rhin au IXe siècle [The author argues that the history of women can only be fully understood when it is considered along with the history of men. Using ninth century polyptiques, the author analyzes women's and men's roles for peasants, serfs, and the unfree. He also suggests reasons for the smaller numbes of women and larger numbers of men in the rural populations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Femmes et pouvoirs des femmes à Byzance et en Occident (VIe -XIe siècles). Colloque international organisé les 28, 29 et 30 mars 1996 à Bruxelles et Villeneuve d'Ascq.   Edited by Stéphane Lebecq, Alain Dierkens, Régine Le Jan, and Jean-Marie Sansterre .   Centre de Recherche sur l'Histoire de l'Europe du Nord-Ouest, Université Charles de Gaulle-Lille 3, 1999. Journal of Medieval History , 26., 4 (December 2000):  Pages 227 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1999.

17. Record Number: 7449
Author(s): Greci, Roberto.
Contributor(s):
Title : Donne e corporazioni: La Fluidità di un rapporto [Women played a subordinate role in the Italian urban economy, but they were involved in various trades. They were particularly active in making cloth. Guilds marginalized women, even when women were involved in making goods. Women also played a significant role as innkeepers and small-scale retailers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Il Lavoro delle donne.   Edited by Angela Groppi .   Storia delle donne in Italia. Editori Laterza, 1996. Journal of Medieval History , 26., 4 (December 2000):  Pages 71 - 91.
Year of Publication: 1996.

18. Record Number: 9803
Author(s): Motz, Lotte.
Contributor(s):
Title : Note on a Bracteate from Trollhättan [The author identifies the object held by a female figure on a bracteate ( ) as a yarn winder. Motz argues that such a tool used in spinning and weaving was also used by women in magical practices to ensure prosperity for the coming year. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Collegium Medievale , 9., ( 1996):  Pages 153 - 155.
Year of Publication: 1996.

19. Record Number: 742
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reproduction and Production in Early Ireland [roles of women, especially as makers of babies and makers of cloth].
Source: Portraits of Medieval and Renaissance Living: Essays in Honor of David Herlihy.   Edited by Samual K. Cohn, Jr. and Steven A. Epstein .   University of Michigan Press, 1996. Journal of Medieval History , 26., 4 (December 2000):  Pages 71 - 89.
Year of Publication: 1996.

20. Record Number: 1356
Author(s): Skinner, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Possessions of Lombard Women in Italy [charters, wills, and dowry lists give evidence of women's moveable property including clothing, jewelry, furniture, tools, cooking utensils, and cloth].
Source: Medieval Life , 2., (Spring 1995):  Pages 8 - 11.
Year of Publication: 1995.

21. Record Number: 31
Author(s): Stuard, Susan Mosher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancillary Evidence for the Decline of Medieval Slavery [Experience of women slaves in the countryside and in wealthy households counters the standard argument made about slavery. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Past and Present , 149 ( 1995):  Pages 3 - 28. Republished in Considering Medieval Women and Gender. Susan Mosher Stuard. Ashgate Variorum, 2010. Chapter VII.
Year of Publication: 1995.

22. Record Number: 244
Author(s): Van Vleck, Amelia E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Textiles as Testimony in Marie de France and "Philomena"
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 22., ( 1995):  Pages 31 - 60. Diversity
Year of Publication: 1995.

23. Record Number: 1559
Author(s): Warren, Nancy Bradley.
Contributor(s):
Title : Objects, Possession, and Identity in the "Lais" of Marie de France [characters are most fully revealed when their possessions (ring, clothing, tapestry, etc.) figure in the action as markers for their true selves].
Source: Romance Languages Annual , 6., ( 1994):  Pages 189 - 192.
Year of Publication: 1994.

24. Record Number: 6389
Author(s): Guimbard, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Appunti sulla legislazione suntuaria a Firenze dal 1281 al 1384 [as the Florentine republic matured, it began to regulate women's dress and expenditures on private festivities to safeguard the stability of the commune; limitations on women's costume was part of a larger effort to moderate any personal expressions that might lead to public disorder; these laws diminished differences between classes without removing them; various arrangements were made for enforcing these laws, including assigning special magistrates to that work; sumptuary laws, however, could not prevent a growing trend toward self expression].
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):  Pages 57 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1992.

25. Record Number: 9534
Author(s): Laiou, Angeliki E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Festival of "Agathe": Comments on the Life of Constantinopolitan Women [The author examines a short treatise by Michael Psellos about the annual festival of Agathe in which women sang and danced near a church. Laiou argues that the women's activities which praised good cloth-making suggest that they were members of a female guild for carders, spinners, and weavers. The article was originally published in Byzantium 1 (1986): 111-122. Volume One was also titled Tribute to Andreas N. Stratos. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gender, Society, and Economic Life in Byzantium. Angeliki E. Laiou Variorum Collected Studies Series .   Ashgate, 1992. Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):  Pages 111 - 122. Originally published in Byzantium 1 (1986): 111-122. Volume One was also titled Tribute to Andreas N. Stratos.
Year of Publication: 1992.

26. Record Number: 10528
Author(s): Piponnier, Francoise.
Contributor(s):
Title : The World of Women [Living quarters and work areas (and artistic representations of domestic activity) reveal much about the everyday life and work of medieval women. Rural women were involved in agricultural tasks like tending grapevines and animals, artisan wives and widows participated in selling crafts, and textile production was largely done by urban women (as were the professional activities of sewing and spinning). Evidence from medieval dwellings gives insight into women’s duties in the domestic sphere, including raising children, preparing meals, and even managing the household. Although they did dominate certain fields such as textile production, women at all levels of society enjoyed less freedom of movement and action than men. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Romance Languages Annual , 6., ( 1994):  Pages 323 - 335.
Year of Publication: 1992.

27. Record Number: 10523
Author(s): Hughes, Diane Owen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Regulating Women’s Fashion [Obsession with fashion was not seen as a particularly feminine problem until the twelfth century, when it became common to condemn women for their appetite for fancy clothing. As commerce in cloth increased, excessive clothing became increasingly associated with women. Governments enacted sumptuary laws (specifying what styles and colors of clothes one could wear) in order to fix social rank and status through clothing. Bourgeois women who were able to adopt rich array and change clothes according to recent fashion trends threatened social hierarchies. In the later Middle Ages clothing began to take on new meanings; it was seen not only as a mark of social status but as a sign of virtue or sin. Women often evaded the clothing constraints forced upon them, thereby reordering social distinctions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Romance Languages Annual , 6., ( 1994):  Pages 136 - 158.
Year of Publication: 1992.

28. Record Number: 10995
Author(s): Tolley, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eleanor of Castile and the "Spanish" Style in England [The author describes Eleanor of Castile's interests in culture and the decorative arts. Tolley also discusses the artistic traditions that Eleanor knew in Spain including rich textiles and elaborate decorative patterns. Tolley suggests that under Eleanor's influence Spanish styles and techniques were introduced into England including the Eleanor Crosses that Edward I set up to commemorate his wife. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: England in the Thirteenth Century: Proceedings of the 1989 Harlaxton Symposium.   Edited by W.M. Ormrod Harlaxton Medieval Studies .   Stamford Watkins , 1991. Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):  Pages 167 - 192.
Year of Publication: 1991.

29. Record Number: 28773
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Annunciation as Hunt of the Unicorn
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

30. Record Number: 30952
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women Spinning and Carding Wool
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

31. Record Number: 32299
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Whore of Babylon Seated on the Waters
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

32. Record Number: 36983
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Pellote of Leonor, Queen of Castile
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

33. Record Number: 37663
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Pamphila collecting cocoons and spinning silk
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

34. Record Number: 38351
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Oseberg Ship Burial
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

35. Record Number: 39179
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Flag of the City of Ghent
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):
Year of Publication:

36. Record Number: 39181
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chemise of St Balthild
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 150., 551 ( 1992):
Year of Publication: