Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


10 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 14139
Author(s): Jochens, Jenny.
Contributor(s):
Title : Germanic Marriage : The Case of Medieval Iceland [The author analyzes the Germanic model of marriage, using written evidence from Iceland. Jochens characterizes pagan marriage as a commercial contract with the right to consent for both the woman and the man. Another important concept, marital fidelity,
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005.  Pages 55 - 65.
Year of Publication: 2005.

2. Record Number: 6612
Author(s): Walker, Alicia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Myth and Magic in Early Byzantine Marriage Jewelry: The Persistence of Pre-Christian Traditions [the author argues that early Byzantine marriage rings were intended to promote and protect marital harmony; "In contrast to the marriage belt from the Dumbarton Oaks Collection and the belt buckle from the Metropolitan Museum, Byzantine marriage rings do not express an overt association with pagan traditions. But, the resonance of their inscriptions with pagan magical texts may still indicate a perpetuation, on some level, of non-Christian practices and beliefs within the social context of Byzantine marriage." p. 69]
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002.  Pages 59 - 78.
Year of Publication: 2002.

3. Record Number: 11781
Author(s): Heusler, Andreas
Contributor(s): Peter, Nelson, trans.
Title : The Story of the Völsi, an Old Norse Anecdote of Conversion [The author discusses a poem included in a Norse compilation, in which a woman worships the disembodied penis of a horse and eventually converts to Christianity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Sex in the Middle Ages: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Joyce E. Salisbury .   Garland Publishing, 1991.  Pages 187 - 200.
Year of Publication: 1991.

4. Record Number: 12743
Author(s): Keefer, Sarah Larratt.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Monastic Echo in an Old English Charm [The Old English metrical poem most commonly known as “Charm for Delayed Birth” is often interpreted as a magical incantation intended to protect a woman from a spontaneous miscarriage or stillbirth. Although the poem may have origins in pagan practices, the poem’s references to Bethlehem and the Nativity give it Christian relevance. Moreover, the poem repeatedly echoes monastic references to scripture and liturgy, giving the poem an oral quality that could serve a prayerful or devotional purpose instead of just being a pagan incantation with Christian terminology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 71 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1990.

5. Record Number: 12744
Author(s): Balas, Edith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cybele and Her Cult in Andrea Mantegna's "The Triumph of Caesar" [English adaptation of French abstract: The article explains in detail the presence, never before noted, of the pagan goddess Cybele in the series of paintings by Mantegna, "The Triumph of Caesar." Mantegna draws upon Classical and early medieval art and literature in order to present Cybele in different roles: political, military, and religious. The author analyzes Cybele in relation to her cult, suggesting that, during the time of Julius Caesar, she became a national goddess. She was carried along from Gaul by the army for protection, and was brought into Rome in triumph as a spoil of war. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gazette des Beaux-Arts , 115., (January 1990):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1990.

6. Record Number: 15602
Author(s): Jochens, Jenny.
Contributor(s):
Title : Old Norse Sources on Women [The author argues that the practices of learned physicians should not be held in opposition to those of midwives. Some folklore was adapted into the humoral system of medicine. In other cases doctors accepted superstitious cures particularly in childbirth and fertility where problems needed decisive remedies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History.   Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal .   University of Georgia Press, 1990.  Pages 189 - 209.
Year of Publication: 1990.

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Title : Idolatry of Solomon
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/77/Hausbuchmeister_Salomos_G%C3%B6tzendienst.jpg/250px-Hausbuchmeister_Salomos_G%C3%B6tzendienst.jpg
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8. Record Number: 33714
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Title : Shield-shaped pendant
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9. Record Number: 37478
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Title : Symmachi tablet
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10. Record Number: 37630
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Title : Hestia Polyolbos tapestry
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