Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


11 Record(s) Found in our database

SEE ALSO: death

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1. Record Number: 17108
Author(s): Fleming, Robin
Contributor(s):
Title : Bones for Historians: Putting the Body back into Biography [The author begins with a case study of a woman's skeleton from a cemetery near Barrington in Cambridgeshire. She was not quite twenty when she died and had extremely rich grave goods including a bed, one of only eleven such bed burials known in England. Surprisingly her skull gives evidence of an advance stage of leprosy and her lower legs were also badly infected. Fleming then considers skeletal evidence for questions about mortality by gender, the impact of children's chronic health problems on their lives as adults, and the health dangers present in urban settings. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Writing Medieval Biography, 750-1250: Essays in Honour of Professor Frank Barlow.   Edited by David Bates, Julia Crick, and Sarah Hamilton .   Boydell Press, 2006.  Pages 29 - 48.
Year of Publication: 2006.

2. Record Number: 19229
Author(s): Bueno, Irene
Contributor(s):
Title : Preferire l'eresia? Donne catare in Linguadoca nel primo Trecento [The histography of women Cathars usually focuses on the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, not on their declining numbers in the early fourteenth century. Evidence from Montaillou shows Cathar teachings transmitted within families. The women who converted often ignored misogynistic tenets of Catharism in favor of elements like belief that dead babies would experience reincarnation. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Storia delle donne 2 (2006): 243-266.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 11828
Author(s): Rawcliffe, Carole
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Childbirth, and Religion in Later Medieval England [The author traces the means by which the church offered support and aid to women facing childbirth. Rawcliffe also accounts for varied responses provided by popular religion including saints, shrines, and charms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003.  Pages 91 - 117.
Year of Publication: 2003.

4. Record Number: 657
Author(s): Falskau, Christian-Frederik.
Contributor(s):
Title : Demographic Decline in Late Medieval England: Some Thoughts on Recent Research [questions the theory that women's employment, especially as servants, drove down population after the Black Death].
Source: Economic History Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 49, 1 (Feb. 1996): 1-19. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

5. Record Number: 2992
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Infant Death in Late Medieval Florence: The Smothering Hypothesis Reconsidered [argues that some infant deaths ascribed to neglectful wet nurses may have been caused by sudden infant death syndrome; neglectful wet nurses did feed female infants less].
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996.  Pages 137 - 153.
Year of Publication: 1996.

6. Record Number: 6014
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Femmes et la mort à la fin du moyen age [the author provides an overview of female mortality based on statistics taken from Florentine ricordanze (which often included family memoirs) for both girls and married women; the author notes the discrepancy in female versus male survival rates with men living in significantly larger proportions from childhood onward; the author also notes the higher mortality rates for women due to death during childbirth].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995.  Pages 207 - 221.
Year of Publication: 1995.

7. Record Number: 8539
Author(s): Mafart, Bertrand- Yves.
Contributor(s):
Title : Approche de la mortalité maternelle au moyen âge en provence
Source: La Femme pendant le Moyen Âge et l'époque moderne. Actes des Sixiémes Journées Anthropologiques de Valbonne 9-10-11 juin 1992.   Edited by Luc Buchet Dossier de Documentation Archéologique, 17.   CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques) Éditions, 1994.  Pages 207 - 219.
Year of Publication: 1994.

8. Record Number: 6838
Author(s): Grauer, A. L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Life Patterns of Women from Medieval York [The author examined skeletal remains from a poor parish in medieval York to learn more about the demography, health, and life expectancies of women. The author found more women than men in the cemetery and that more women than men died between the ages of 25 and 35. Because women's skeletons showed fewer signs of stressors, the author theorizes that women were less able than men to fight off serious diseases or injuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Archaeology of Gender: Proceedings of the Twenty-Second Annual Conference of the Archaeological Association of the University of Calgary.   Edited by Dale Walde and Noreen D. Willows .   University of Calgary Archaeology Association, 1991.  Pages 407 - 413.
Year of Publication: 1991.

9. Record Number: 37578
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Death and the wet nurse
Source:
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10. Record Number: 37613
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Death and the prostitute (on the left)
Source:
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11. Record Number: 37614
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Death and the old debutante (on the right)
Source:
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