Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


7 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 45686
Author(s): Powell, Susan
Contributor(s):
Title : Household Accounts of Lady Margaret Beaufort
Source: The Household Accounts of Lady Margaret Beaufort (1443-1509): From the Archives of St John's College, Cambridge   Edited by Susan Powell Records of Social and Economic History, New series 63.   Oxford University Press - Published for the British Academy, 2022.  Pages 85 - 646.
Year of Publication: 2022.

2. Record Number: 12610
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Material and Symbolic Gift-Giving: Clothes in English and French Wills [The practice of bequeathing clothing to friends, relatives, and others in one’s will was common in late medieval and Early Modern England and France. Major differences in how clothing is dispensed in the wills arise not when one compares the gender of particular testators but the socioeconomic class of the individual. Among lower class people, items of clothing function as commodities (objects of use or value to be passed along), but for bourgeois and aristocratic people clothing carries both material and symbolic value. In these social classes, giving clothing can signify a sentimental attachment to a person or it can constitute a spiritual act of almsgiving. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 137 - 146.
Year of Publication: 2004.

3. Record Number: 12605
Author(s): Burns, Jane E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Textiles Make a Difference [Dress, textiles, and cloth production are emerging as important categories of analysis in medieval studies. While investigating textiles and representations thereof (in literary, historical, legal, and religious texts), medievalists cross disciplinary boundaries in order to examine how the personal and cultural realms interact. Social theorists, feminists, and scholars of material culture can all contribute to our understandings of how goods and objects take upon new meanings for men and women in different social contexts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 12606
Author(s): Starkey, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Tristan” Slippers: An Image of Adultery or a Symbol of Marriage? [Leather slippers decorated with iconography apparently representing the adulterous courtly couple Tristan and Isolde were popular in the urban centers of the Low Countries, and these shoes were perhaps given as bridal gifts or in betrothal ceremonies. Although the image of an adulterous couple may not seem appropriate for shoes associated with marriage, other iconography on the slippers (such as an orchard, falcon, chessboard, and literary inscriptions) and contemporary Dutch literature about the Tristan story indicate that the urban public was reappropriating elements of courtly culture. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 35 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 6611
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Weapons to Probe the Womb: The Material Culture of Abortion and Contraception in the Early Byzantine Period [The author examines surviving medical instruments designed for surgical abortions and a variety of literary texts to determine the procedures as well as the social and religious contexts for birth control].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002.  Pages 33 - 57.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 6613
Author(s): Sekules, Veronica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spinning Yarns: Clean Linen and Domestic Values in Late Medieval French Culture [the author argues that linen was an important responsibility for the housewife, whether bourgeois or aristocratic; linen was associated with cleanliness, health, and domestic ease; the author uses as evidence the household inventory of Jeanne de Chastel (1347), widow of Raoul de Presles, clerk to the king, and the inventory of Marguerite de Rohan (1497), countess of Angoulême].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002.  Pages 79 - 91.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 6256
Author(s): Halpin, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Piety. Part Three of Court and Piety in Late Anglo-Saxon England by Mary Frances Smith, Robin Fleming, and Patricia Halpin [the author focuses on the often rich material goods, sometimes of their own making, that women gave to the Church, including embroideries, woven cloth, ecclesiastical vestments, crucifixes, books, and jewelry; the author argues that women in general were concerned with encouraging a private, personal spirituality and had more control over the dispersal of their material goods than their land].
Source: Catholic Historical Review (Full Text via Project Muse) 87, 4 (October 2001): 588-602. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.