Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


20 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 27565
Author(s): Garver, Valerie L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Weaving Words in Silk: Women and Inscribed Bands in the Carolingian World [The author analyzes three silk woven bands surviving from Carolingian Germany: Witgar’s belt, Ailbecunda band, and the Speyer band. Witgar’s belt was a gift from Emma, wife of King Louis the German, to Witgar, the future bishop of Augsburg. In these three cases women not only donated high-status silk inscribed bands, but evidence also points to women as weavers of the tablet bands. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 33 - 56.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 27568
Author(s): Stanford, Charlotte A. ,
Contributor(s):
Title : Donations from the Body for the Soul: Apparel, Devotion, and Status in Late Medieval Strasbourg [The author analyzes evidence of lay people’s contributions to the building and services of Strasbourg’s cathedral as recorded in the “Book of Donors” from the early fourteenth century to 1521. Many people contributed clothing and related items, both for resale and for use in liturgical services. Stanford notes women’s participation as donors and the varieties of women’s clothing and ornaments given as gifts. She underlines the personal nature of many women’s gifts including elaborate linens decorated with gold and silk destined for the Virgin’s chapel. The appendices include a glossary of apparel-related terms in the “Book of Donors” both in Latin and in German (pages 199-205). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 173 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2010.

3. Record Number: 24046
Author(s): Schulenburg, Jane Tibbetts
Contributor(s):
Title : Holy Women and the Needle Arts: Piety, Devotion, and Stitching the Sacred, ca. 500- 1150 [The author catalogs evidence of women’s embroidery for the Church done by queens, noble women, and nuns. They decorated Church vestments with gold, silver, and jewels. Schulenburg argues that their skills were values and associated with wisdom. Many of the embroiderers and patrons hoped for the special prayers of saints in return for their shining gifts. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 83 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2009.

4. Record Number: 12610
Author(s): Ashley, Kathleen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Material and Symbolic Gift-Giving: Clothes in English and French Wills [The practice of bequeathing clothing to friends, relatives, and others in one’s will was common in late medieval and Early Modern England and France. Major differences in how clothing is dispensed in the wills arise not when one compares the gender of particular testators but the socioeconomic class of the individual. Among lower class people, items of clothing function as commodities (objects of use or value to be passed along), but for bourgeois and aristocratic people clothing carries both material and symbolic value. In these social classes, giving clothing can signify a sentimental attachment to a person or it can constitute a spiritual act of almsgiving. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 137 - 146.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 11959
Author(s): Beech, George T.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Eleanor of Aquitaine Vase
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. French Studies , 57., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 369 - 376.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 9858
Author(s): Campbell, Emma
Contributor(s):
Title : Separating the Saints from the Boys: Sainthood and Masculinity in the Old French "Vie de Saint Alexis" [Based on an essay which obtained the R. H. Gapper Graduate Essay Prize in 2002 from the Society for French Studies (See www.sfs.ac.uk). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: French Studies , 57., 4 (October 2003):  Pages 447 - 462.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 8956
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Circulation of Books [The author argues that patronage has been regarded as the dominant, if not exclusive, means by which people acquired books at the French court. However, there were other ways that women were more likely to have books including inheritance, wedding presents, and New Year's Day gifts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 9 - 31. Issue Title: Women and Book Culture in Late Medieval and Early Modern France
Year of Publication: 2001.

8. Record Number: 7365
Author(s): Miglio, Massimo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feste di matrimonio a Roma [A papal master of ceremonies complained about the small part religion played in Roman marriages. Accounts of actual marriages, like that of Rosata Caffari, reveal a complex series of agreements between families, gift giving and festivities. This culminated in the bride's transfer to the groom's residence. These practices exalted the families involved and reinforced social solidarity.]
Source: Patrimonium in festa: cortei, tornei, artifici e feste alla fine del Medioevo (secoli XV-XVI).   Edited by Anna Modigliani .   Centro di Studi per il Patrimonio di S. Pietro in Tuscia; Ente Ottava Medievale di Orte, 2000. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 119 - 131.
Year of Publication: 2000.

9. Record Number: 4001
Author(s): Bestor, Jane Fair.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage Transactions in Renaissance Italy and Mauss's "Essay on the Gift" [The author focuses on the gifts that the groom gave the bride including jewelry, ornaments, and rich clothing; by the fifteenth century grooms retained use over these expensive items and often rented them out or sold them.]
Source: Past and Present (Full Text via JSTOR) 164 (August 1999): 6-46. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1999.

10. Record Number: 3565
Author(s): French, Katherine L.
Contributor(s):
Title : I Leave My Best Gown as a Vestment: Women's Spiritual Interests in the Late Medieval English Parish [The author points out that women often were at pains to suggest how their houshold goods could be adapted to ecclesiastical usage; in this way they were able to express their pious concerns despite social, economic, and legal limitations].
Source: Magistra , 4., 1 (Summer 1998):  Pages 57 - 77.
Year of Publication: 1998.

11. Record Number: 1600
Author(s): Sutton, Anne F. and Livia Visser-Fuchs
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cult of Angels in Late Fifteenth-Century England: An Hours of the Guardian Angel Presented to Queen Elizabeth Woodville [appendices include a full description of the manuscript along with a transcription of the Latin text of the "Hymn to the Guardian Angel" and an English translation].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. Magistra , 4., 1 (Summer 1998):  Pages 230 - 265.
Year of Publication: 1997.

12. Record Number: 911
Author(s): Howell, Martha C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fixing Movables: Gifts by Testament in Late Medieval Douai [The personal goods that women bequeathed to family, friends, and the poor carried social meaning and economic value].
Source: Past and Present (Full Text via JSTOR) 150 (Feb. 1996): 3-45. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

13. Record Number: 685
Author(s): Rosenwein, Barbara H.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Family Politics of Berengar I, King of Italy (888-924) [Berengar gave gifts and privileges to three groups: important women, loyal friends at court, and sometime allies beyond the Adda].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 71,2 (April 1996): 247-289. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

14. Record Number: 743
Author(s): Rosenwein, Barbara H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Friends and Family, Politics and Privilege in the Kingship of Berengar I [among the recipients and petitioners were his wife, Queen Bertilla, daughter Berta, abbess of San Salvatore di Brescia, and son-in-law Adalbert, married to daughter Gisla].
Source: Portraits of Medieval and Renaissance Living: Essays in Honor of David Herlihy.   Edited by Samual K. Cohn, Jr. and Steven A. Epstein .   University of Michigan Press, 1996.  Pages 91 - 106.
Year of Publication: 1996.

15. Record Number: 16623
Author(s): Klapisch-Zuber, Christiane
Contributor(s):
Title : Les femmes dans les rituels de l'alliance et de la naissance à Florence [Christiane Klapisch-Zuber explores Florentine women's roles in rituals celebrating marriage and childbirth. She looks in particular at the meanings of "cassoni" (wedding chests) and "deschi da parto" (painted plates associated with the birth of children). She frequently finds situations in which the needs of the patrilineage and family honor trump the concerns of wives, mothers, and their natal families. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Riti e rituali nelle società medievali.   Edited by Jacques Chiffoleau, Lauro Martines, and Agostino Paravicini Bagliani .   Centro Italiano di Studi sull'Alto Medioevo, 1994.  Pages 3 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1994.

16. Record Number: 10885
Author(s): Steinle, Eric M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Knot, the Belt, and the Making of "Guigemar" [Marie de France uses imagery in her lais in order to summarize the structural and thematic concerns of her poems. In “Guigemar,” the knot and the belt (which the lovers exchange as love tokens) and thematic references to forms of enclosure symbolize the thematic unity and circular narrative of the poem; the knot and the belt are also metaphors that refer to Marie’s own role as “maker” or author of intricate narratives. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Assays: Critical Approaches to Medieval and Renaissance Texts , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 29 - 53.
Year of Publication: 1991.

17. Record Number: 12752
Author(s): Heslop, T. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Production of De Luxe Manuscripts and the Patronage of King Cnut and Queen Emma [Many lavishly illustrated English Gospel books and devotional manuscripts were produced during the reign of King Cnut and Queen Emma. These luxury items were produced with royal money with the intent that they would be given as presents to powerful individuals in order to help secure allegiance to the crown or they were given (alongside valuable relics or artwork) to institutions like monasteries and churches in order to convey the donors’ piety. Evidence from the handwriting and illumination of Gospel books during the period suggests a large scale production by monastic scribes and artists who worked in close collaboration. Three Appendices. Appendix One lists lavishly illuminated Anglo-Saxon Gospels, 990-1030, with the name of the manuscript, its scribe(s), probable origin, and earliest known medieval ownership. Appendix Two provides excerpts from Latin accounts that give evidence of patronage of art and donation of relics by Cnut and Emma. Appendix Three gives bibliographical information on the Besancon and Copenhagen Gospel books, including information on foliation, ruling, scribes, artists, production sequence, date and origin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 19., ( 1990):  Pages 151 - 195.
Year of Publication: 1990.

18. Record Number: 33957
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Abbess Hitda gives a codex to St. Walburga
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 19., ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

19. Record Number: 33958
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Plaque with Adam and Eve at the Forge
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 19., ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

20. Record Number: 39188
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Coffret with Frau Minne
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 19., ( 1990):
Year of Publication: