Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


8 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 38263
Author(s): Troup, Cynthia
Contributor(s):
Title : 'With Open Doors' in the Tor de' Specchi: The Chiesa Vecchia Frescoes and the Monks of Santa Maria Nova
Source: Studies on Florence and the Italian Renaissance in Honour of F. W. Kent.   Edited by Peter Howard and Cecilia Hewlett .   Brepols , 2016.  Pages 405 - 427.
Year of Publication: 2016.

2. Record Number: 20339
Author(s): Ricci, Alessio
Contributor(s):
Title : Recorsivita e semplicita delle "visioni" di Francesca Romana: su alcuni aspetti sintattici e testuali del discorso mistico [The Latin translation of Giovanni Mattioti's collection of evidence for the sanctity of Frances of Rome leaves out the flavor of the Italian original. The iconography of Frances' visions is described, but some of her less tactful remarks also are exclude
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006.  Pages 231 - 255.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 20149
Author(s): Troup, Cynthia
Contributor(s):
Title : Art History and the Resistant Presence of a Saint - The chiesa vecchia Frescoes at Rome's Tor de' Specchi [Attilio Rossi was the first art historian to write in depth about the fresco cycle at Tore de' Specchi illustrating the life of Frances of Rome. These images were painted c. 1468 by Antoniazzo Romano or artists associated with him for the Oblates of Santa Francesca Romana. Rossi treated the images in rhetorical terms as illustrating the triumph of the saint through the depiction of the saint's life. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Rituals, Images, and Words: Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by F. W. Kent and Charles Zika Late Medieval Early Modern Studies .   Brepols, 2005.  Pages 119 - 145.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 3502
Author(s): Elliott, Dyan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dominae or "Dominatae"? Female Mysticism and the Trauma of Textuality
Source: Women, Marriage, and Family in Medieval Christendom: Essays in Memory of Michael M. Sheehan, C.S.B.   Edited by Constance M. Rousseau and Joel T. Rosenthal .   Western Michigan University, 1998.  Pages 47 - 77.
Year of Publication: 1998.

5. Record Number: 757
Author(s): Esposito, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Francesca and the Female Religious Communities of Fifteenth- Century Rome [the sociopolitical environment of Saint Francesca and the penitent noble women who formed the community of Tor de' Specchi].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval and Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Daniel Bornstein and Roberto Rusconi. Trans. by Margery J. Schneider .   University of Chicago Press, 1996.  Pages 197 - 218. Originally published as "S. Francesca Bussa dei Ponziani e le comunit√† religiose femminili a Roma nel secolo XV" in Mistiche e devote nell'Italia tardomedievale. Edited by Daniel Bornstein and Roberto Rusconi (Liguori Editore, 1992). Pages 187-208.
Year of Publication: 1996.

6. Record Number: 6628
Author(s): Fortini, Laura.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'amore per il mondo di una mistica del Quattrocento romano: Francesca Bussa dei Ponziani [Francesca Bussa has left us poems and accounts of her visions as presented in Giovanni Mattiotti's Latin "Vita" and his vernacular version; traces of her orality are still apparent; Francesca also was linked with a community of devout women].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 205 - 218. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

7. Record Number: 10986
Author(s): Gill, Katherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Open Monasteries for Women in Late Medieval and Early Modern Italy: Two Roman Examples [The author examines the cases of the oblates of Tor de' Specchi (a community of religious lay women gathered around Francesca Bussa dei Ponziani in Rome) and the "pinzochere" associated with the church of Sant'Agostino in Rome. Gill argues that the success of these informal religious communities in Italy was associated in part with the opportunities they offered women to play a variety of social roles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Crannied Wall: Women, Religion, and the Arts in Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Craig A. Monson .   University of Michigan Press, 1992. Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 15 - 47.
Year of Publication: 1992.

8. Record Number: 40971
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesca Romana heals a young man who had lost the use of his leg
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):
Year of Publication: