Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


40 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 13656
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Teaching Anchoritic Texts: The Shock of the Old [The author discusses texts written for anchoresses, various available editions, and their uses in the classroom. The appendix presents an edited extract in Middle English from "The Rule of a Recluse," the late medieval version of Aelred's letter to his sister, "De Institutione Inclusarum." Following the letter, there is a gloss translating the more difficult words in the Middle English text. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Approaching Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical Texts. Christianity and Culture: Issues in Teaching and Research Series, Volume 2.   Edited by Dee Dyas, Valerie Edden, and Roger Ellis .   D. S. Brewer, 2005.  Pages 131 - 143.
Year of Publication: 2005.

2. Record Number: 8948
Author(s): Edsall, Mary Agnes.
Contributor(s):
Title : True Anchoresses are Called Birds: Asceticism as Ascent and the Purgative Mysticism of the "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 157 - 186.
Year of Publication: 2003.

3. Record Number: 8066
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Powers of Record, Powers of Example: Hagiography and Women's History [The author compares an Anglo-Norman hagiography collection from Campsey with the "Ancrene Wisse" and its associated "Katherine Group." While the "Ancrene Wisse" presents hagiography as romance, the Campsey manuscript presents many role models for women in which they act together in groups and inhabit an historical setting. The author argues that the collection represents a collectivity of noble women's interests in the areas of monasticism, ecclesiastic issues, and family. It is centered on East Anglia but has networks of connections running through England and the continent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 71 - 93.
Year of Publication: 2003.

4. Record Number: 8065
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : With the Heat of the Hungry Heart : Empowerment and "Ancrene Wisse" [Watson presents his article in two parts. First he argues that the author of the "Ancrene Wisse" conceives of his anchoress readers as herioc figures whose difficult lives raise them above others and serve as a sign of the coming breakdown between clergy and laity. Secondly Watson looks at the influences the text had on later writings which were addressed to lay readers, frequently men. Title note supplied by Feminae. ].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 52 - 70.
Year of Publication: 2003.

5. Record Number: 11094
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse, Religious Reform and the Late Middle Ages [The author examines later Middle English texts that borrowed heavily from the "Ancrene Wisse." For the most part their authors were interested in adapting the anchoritic life for devout lay men and women. In some cases the texts have a pronounced puritan streak. The "Ancrene Wisse's" theme of living a life of perfection appealed to many reformist authors in fourteenth century England. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 197 - 226.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 11086
Author(s): Savage, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Communal Authorship of "Ancrene Wisse" [Savage argues that the male cleric traditionally identified as the author of the "Ancrene Wisse" wrote out of his long experience with the three anchoress sisters and reacted to their comments and suggestions. The text should properly be considered to have been jointly authored. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 45 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 11095
Author(s): Dahood, Roger.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the Identities of Mary Salome [In the later Middle Ages Mary Salome was identified as the third woman at the tomb of Christ, although she is not directly in the Bible. By the twelfth century a tradition had grown that recognized three marriages for Anne, the mother of the Virgin Mary, and three daughter all named Mary, the Virgin, Mary Cleophas, and Mary Salome. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 227 - 243.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 11087
Author(s): Dance, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : The AB Language: The Recluse, the Gossip, and the Language Historian [The AB language is the dialect of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the "Katherine Group." It came from the Herefordshire/Shropshire area. In style and vocabulary it combines the homespun with the learned. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 57 - 82.
Year of Publication: 2003.

9. Record Number: 11093
Author(s): von Nolcken, Christina.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Recluse" and Its Readers: Some Observations on a Lollard Interpolated Version of "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 175 - 196.
Year of Publication: 2003.

10. Record Number: 11091
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Savoring "Scienta": The Medieval Anchoress Reads "Ancrene Wisse" [The author explores the reading experience that the "Ancrene Wisse" afforded the anchoress. Though intended as a guide book, it also encouraged the devout reader to experience Christ's life and thus transcend the limits of the anchorhold. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 113 - 144.
Year of Publication: 2003.

11. Record Number: 9637
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : This Living Hand: Thirteenth-Century Female Literacy, Materialist Immanence, and the Reader of the "Ancrene Wisse" [The author first surveys the manuscripts of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the languages that early readers would have used. Then she analyzes the broadly historical context of thirteenth century female religious readers. In the final section, Robertson focuses
Source: Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 1 - 36. Abridged version published in Medieval Literature: Criticism and Debates. Edited by Holly A. Crocker and D. Vance Smith. Routledge, 2014. Pages 162-179.
Year of Publication: 2003.

12. Record Number: 11092
Author(s): Innes-Parker, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Legacy of "Ancrene Wisse ": Translations, Adaptations, Influences, and Audience, with Special Attention to Women Readers [The author traces the adaptations and echoes of the "Ancrene Wisse" in fourteenth and fifteenth century vernacular devotional literature. In looking at manuscript ownership and wills, Innes-Parker finds circles of reading among religious and lay women. Surprisingly the most innovative texts quickly found their way into women's possession. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 145 - 173.
Year of Publication: 2003.

13. Record Number: 11085
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Genre of "Ancrene Wisse" [The author traces the sources that influenced the "Ancrene Wisse," beginning with Augustine's "libellus" of practical and spiritual advice through the near-contemporary Domincan adaptations of the Premonstratensian customary. Millett also signals the influence of the Fourth Lateran Council in 1215 which would have made the "Ancrene Wisse" author more leery of encouraging new religious orders as well as taking on the pastoral care of religious women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 29 - 44.
Year of Publication: 2003.

14. Record Number: 11090
Author(s): Edwards, A. S. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Middle English Manuscripts and Early Readers of "Ancrene Wisse" [The author describes nine surviving manuscripts which include Middle English versions of the "Ancrene Wisse." Edwards also notes the marginal comments made by sixteenth and seventeenth century churchmen and antiquarians. Title not supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 103 - 112.
Year of Publication: 2003.

15. Record Number: 11089
Author(s): Trotter, D. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anglo-French Lexis of "Ancrene Wisse": A Re-evaluation [The author argues that the text of the "Ancrene Wisse" demonstrates at a very early period a high number of Anglo-French loan words as well as the combination of Anglo-French morphemes, e.g. turpelnesse (Anglo-French stem with Middle English verb ending). This familiarity shows the depth of language contact in England at the beginning of the thirteenth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 83 - 101.
Year of Publication: 2003.

16. Record Number: 6635
Author(s): Warren, Ann K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virginal Effects: Text and Identity in "Ancrene Wisse" [The author argues that the anchoritic construction of virginity is mainly dependent on language which makes visible an "inner" core].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 36 - 48.
Year of Publication: 2002.

17. Record Number: 8306
Author(s): Gunn, Cate.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse: A Modern Lay Person's Guide to a Medieval Religious Text [The author argues that the "Ancrene Wisse" needs to be read carefully with reference to its historical context, modern scholarly theories, and spiritual environment. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Magistra , 8., 1 (Summer 2002):  Pages 3 - 25.
Year of Publication: 2002.

18. Record Number: 11035
Author(s): McAvoy, Liz Herbert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ant Nes He Him Seolf Reclus i Maries Wombe?: Julian of Norwich, the Anchorhold, and Redemption of the Monstrous Female Body [The author explores the themes of suffering and enclosure as characteristically feminine phenomena which gave anchoresses access to the divine. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. Magistra , 8., 1 (Summer 2002):  Pages 128 - 143.
Year of Publication: 2002.

19. Record Number: 6165
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Efter the Measse-Cos, Hwen the Preost Sacred: When is the Moment of Ecstasy in "Ancrene Wisse" [The author examines a passage in the "Ancrene Wisse" concerning the respect that the anchoress should show to the host and the presence of Christ].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 2001):  Pages 105 - 108.
Year of Publication: 2001.

20. Record Number: 8549
Author(s): Amsler, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affective Literacy: Gestures of Reading in the Later Middle Ages [The author uses "affective literacy" to mean the ways people develop emotional, gestural, and other physical relationships with texts. He argues that the "Ancrene Wisse" regulated its readers' devotional, physical, and affective behaviors. Transgressive literacy, in which readers touched or kissed images, gave them a relationship with sacred texts which came close to that of clerics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies: Proceeding of the Illinois Medieval Association (Full Text via Project Muse) 18 (2001): 83-110 Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

21. Record Number: 5457
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the Book of Hours [the author argues that the instructions for devotions in the "Ancrene Wisse" represent a middle stage between monastic practice and the Book of Hours, the "breviary for the use of the laity;" the Appendix reproduces an excerpt from the "Ancrene Wisse" and from the early Dominican Constitution dealing with the instructions for saying Matins].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000.  Pages 21 - 40.
Year of Publication: 2000.

22. Record Number: 4273
Author(s): Chewning, Susannah Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Paradox of Virginity within the Anchoritic Tradition: The Masculine Gaze and the Feminine Body in the "Wohunge" Group
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999.  Pages 113 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 4405
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the Conditions of Confession [the author traces the development of the conditions of confession in the twelfth century in order to evaluate its presentation in the "Ancrene Wisse;" she concludes that the "Ancrene Wisse"'s uniqueness is to be found in its expansion of the conditions of confession with non-scriptural "exempla" and other borrowings].
Source: English Studies , 80., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 193 - 215.
Year of Publication: 1999.

24. Record Number: 3509
Author(s): Savage, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Solitary Heroine: Aspects of Meditation and Mysticism in "Ancrene Wisse," the Katherine Group, and the Wooing Group
Source: Mysticism and Spirituality in Medieval England.   Edited by William F. Pollard and Robert Boenig .   D.S. Brewer, 1997. Mystics Quarterly , 23., 2 (June 1997):  Pages 63 - 83.
Year of Publication: 1997.

25. Record Number: 1973
Author(s): Innes-Parker, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Subversion and Conformity in Julian's "Revelation": Authority, Vision, and the Motherhood of God [in part compares images of motherhood in Julian with those in "Ancrene Wisse" and "The Chastising of God's Children"].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 23., 2 (June 1997):  Pages 7 - 35.
Year of Publication: 1997.

26. Record Number: 1434
Author(s): Vesce, Thomas E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Light Leaps in "Ancrene Wisse" VI: "Wid Lihtleapes Buggen Eche Blisse"? [the anchoress is enjoined to avoid the leap into lechery and pride, like the leaps of Eve and Lucifer, but instead imitate the leaps of Christ].
Source: Mediaevalia , 19., ( 1996):  Pages 385 - 403. (1996 (for 1993)) Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1996.

27. Record Number: 1827
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : Peintunge and "Schadewe" in "Ancrene Wisse" Part 4 [argues that the source for "Schadewe" (Shadow) and "Peintunge" (Image) comes, not from Hugh of St. Victor and ultimately Plato's theory of ideas, but from Alain de Lille's "Summa de arte praedicatoria" in which he describes three kinds of fire].
Source: Notes and Queries , 4 (December 1996):  Pages 399 - 403.
Year of Publication: 1996.

28. Record Number: 259
Author(s): Dusel, Juliana, Sister
Contributor(s):
Title : Bride of Christ: Image in the the "Ancren Riwle"
Source: Sovereign Lady: Essays on Women in Middle English Literature.   Edited by Muriel Whitaker .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Comitatus , 26., ( 1995):  Pages 115 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1995.

29. Record Number: 394
Author(s): Zimmermann, Margarete.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sharpen Your Mind with the Whetstone of Books: The Female Recluse as Reader in Goscelin's "Liber Confortatorius," Aelred of Rievaulx's "De Institutione Inclusarum," and the "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 113 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1995.

30. Record Number: 396
Author(s): Bell, David N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse and the "Wohunge of Ure Lauerd": The Thirteenth- Century Female Reader and the Lover- Knight
Source: Women, the Book and the Godly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 1 [Volume 2: Women, the Book and the Worldly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 137 - 147.
Year of Publication: 1995.

31. Record Number: 617
Author(s): Biscoglio, Frances M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fragmentation and Reconstruction: Images of the Female Body in "Ancrene Wisse" and the Katherine Group [images of the erotic, the maternal, the ascetic, and of fertility represent the union of the anchoress with Christ].
Source: Comitatus , 26., ( 1995):  Pages 27 - 52. [Contributions are accepted from graduate students and those who have received their doctorates within the last three years]
Year of Publication: 1995.

32. Record Number: 677
Author(s): Laing, Margaret and Angus McIntosh
Contributor(s):
Title : The Language of "Ancrene Riwle," the Katherine Group Texts and "The Wohunge of Ure Lauerd" in BL Cotton Titus D XVIII [detailed analysis of language overlays including a North West Midland element and a North Midland element].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 235 - 263.
Year of Publication: 1995.

33. Record Number: 1438
Author(s): Best, Myra.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lady and the King: "Ancrene Wisse's" Parable of the Royal Wooing Re-Examined
Source: English Studies , 75., 6 (November 1994):  Pages 509 - 522.
Year of Publication: 1994.

34. Record Number: 8478
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaste Bodies: Frames and Experiences [The author explores the "Ancrene Wisse," arguing that it embodies an ideology of containment for women in its emphasis on the enclosed, chaste body. At the same time there are slips since the manuscript shows glimpses of a textual community and even of anchoresses living together. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. English Studies , 75., 6 (November 1994):  Pages 24 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1994.

35. Record Number: 5263
Author(s): Beckwith, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Passionate Regulation: Enclosure, Ascesis, and the Feminist Imaginary [The author examines the ways in which the body of the anchoress in the "Ancrene Wisse" is controlled through practices including confession, asceticism, regulation of the senses, and physical enactments of "imitatio Christi"].
Source: South Atlantic Quarterly , 93., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 803 - 824.
Year of Publication: 1994.

36. Record Number: 14767
Author(s): Baker, Denise N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Julian of Norwich and the Anchoritic Literature [The author examines the possiblity that Julian of Norwich might have been influenced by "De inclusarum institutione," the "Ancrene Wisse," Rolle's "Form of Living," and Hilton's "Scale of Perfection." The evidence is not conclusive in any of the cases. However, it is clear that Julian was familiar with the tenets of medieval spirituality as reflected in devotional and anchoritic texts of the time. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 19., 4 (December 1993):  Pages 148 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1993.

37. Record Number: 9458
Author(s): Bartlett, Anne Clark.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Delicious Matyr”: Feminine Courtesy in Middle English Devotional Literature for Women [The author explores how devotional texts addressed to women readers often used the discourses of courtly literature and romances, while at the same time critiquing these literary conventions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies , 9., ( 1992):  Pages 9 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1992.

38. Record Number: 10015
Author(s): Rumsey, Lucinda.
Contributor(s):
Title : The scorpion of lechery and Ancrene Wisse [The author explores the symbolic use of the scorpion in the Ancrene Wisse. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medium Aevum , 61., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 48 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1992.

39. Record Number: 10017
Author(s): Millett, Bella.
Contributor(s):
Title : The origins of Ancrene Wisse: new answers, new questions [The author reconsiders the West Midlands and Augustinian origins of the Ancrene Wisse. The Appendix presents the Lay Brothers‚ Hours from the Dominican constitutions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medium Aevum , 61., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 206 - 228.
Year of Publication: 1992.

40. Record Number: 12805
Author(s): Diekstra, F.N.M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Fifteenth-Century Borrowings from the "Ancrene Wisse" [The article traces out the borrowings from Ancrene Wisse in two unedited fifteenth-century manuscripts, British Library Harley 6571 and British Library Additional 30944, and presents edited versions of the various parallel passages. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Studies , 71., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 81 - 104.
Year of Publication: 1990.