Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


  • Record Number: 8706
  • Author(s)/Creator(s): Higgins , Paula.
  • Contributor(s):
  • Title: Parisian Nobles, a Scottish Princess, and the Woman's Voice in Late Medieval Song [The author identifies two different women named Jacqueline de Hacqueville in fifteenth century Paris who may have been the woman referred to in Antoine Busnoy's songs. The author suggests that Jacqueline herself wrote two poems in response to Busnoys and may have actively participated in the musical culture of the court. The author more generally examines late medieval poetry written in a woman's voice and suggests that many anonymous poems may well have been the work of women. The appendices present the text and English translations of the Hacqueville songs, "Ja que lui ne si actende," "A vous sans autre me viens rendre," "Je ne puis vivre ainsi tousiours," and "A que ville est abhominable." Appendix Two lists the family members of Jacques de Hacquville according to a legal document from 1482.].
  • Source URL: Early Music History (Full Text via JSTOR) 10 (1991): 145-200. Link Info target = '_blank'>Early Music History (Full Text via JSTOR) 10 (1991): 145-200. Link Info
  • Description:
  • Article Type: Edition of Text;Journal Article;Translation
  • Subject (See Also): Busnoys, Antoine, Composer Courts- Musical Activity Elite Women Female Voice in Literature Jacqueline de Hacqueville, Possibly a Lady-in-Waiting at the French court or the Daughter of a Wealthy Cloth Merchant, Who Wrote Poems/Songs to Antoine Busnoys - Ja
  • Award Note:
  • Geographic Area: France
  • Century: 15
  • Primary Evidence:
  • Illustrations: Eleven figures. "A que ville est abhominable," Dijon, Bibliothèque Muncipale, MS 517, fols. 18v-19. Figure Two Anagram from the anonymous "Pour les biens qu'en vous je parçoy"-"Ces vers pour Bunoys, Jacqueline." Figure Three Anagrams from Machaut's "Le livre du voir-dit" as solved by Paulin Paris and Jacqueline Cerquiglini. Figure Four Examples of famous anagrams from the sixteenth century. Figure Five Anagram from Christine de Pizan's Ballade 100. Figure Six Anagram signature for the fifteenth-century artist Jean Colombe. Figure Seven Names attached to poems in B-Br 10572, a poetry album of Marguerite d'Autriche. Figure Eight Anagrams hiding women's names from a fifteenth-century poetry collection. Figure Nine The beginning of the "Mellon Chansonnier" is an anagram for Beatrice d'Aragon. Figure Ten Six manuscript initials representing boars in association with the music of Busnoys. Since the boar was associated with St. Anthony Abbot, the author argues that the boar may serve as an iconographic signifier for Busnoys. Figure Eleven Text and English translation of Jehanne Filleul's "Hélas mon amy sur mon ame" and the anonymous "Pour les biens qu'en vous je parçoy."
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  • Abstract:
  • Author's Affiliation: University of Notre Dame
  • Conference Info: - , -
  • Year of Publication: 1991.
  • Language: English;Middle English
  • ISSN/ISBN: 02611279
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