Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


55 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 36088
Author(s): Ermine de Reims
Contributor(s):
Title : Appendix: The Visions of Ermine de Reims
Source: The Strange Case of Ermine de Reims: A Medieval Woman between Demons and Saints. Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015.  Pages 157 - 186.
Year of Publication: 2015.

2. Record Number: 35567
Author(s): , Pseudo-Bernard
Contributor(s): Mouron, Anne E., ed.
Title : A devoute tretes of holy Saynt Bernard, drawne oute of Latyn into English, callid The Manere of Good Lyvyng
Source: The Manere of Good Lyvyng: A Middle English Translation of Pseudo-Bernard's Liber de modo bene vivendi ad sororem.   Edited by Anne E. Mouron. Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts series .   Brepols, 2014.  Pages 41 - 182.
Year of Publication: 2014.

3. Record Number: 29909
Author(s): Ehrenschwendtner, Marie-Luise
Contributor(s):
Title : Creating the Sacred Space Within: Enclosure as a Defining Feature in the Convent Life of Medieval Dominican Sisters (13th–15th c.)
Source: Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 301 - 316.
Year of Publication: 2010.

4. Record Number: 15887
Author(s): Anderson, Wendy Love.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Real Presence of Mary: Eucharistic Disbelief and the Limits of Orthodoxy in Fourteenth-Century France [The author analyses the case of Aude Fauré which was recorded in Bishop Jacques Fourniers' inquisitorial "Register." She gave two different accounts of her "error" in belief with the second version accepted by the tribunal and penances assigned. Anderson argues that Aude demonstrates a deeper theological understanding and a more complex spirituality than earlier scholars have recognized. Title notes upplied by Feminae.].
Source: Church History , 75., 4 (December 2006):  Pages 748 - 767.
Year of Publication: 2006.

5. Record Number: 20730
Author(s): Mecham, June L
Contributor(s):
Title : Breaking Old Habits: Recent Research on Women, Spirituality, and the Arts in the Middle Ages
Source: History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 448 - 480.
Year of Publication: 2006.

6. Record Number: 28214
Author(s): Newman, Barbara
Contributor(s):
Title : What Did It Mean to Say "I Saw"? The Clash between Theory and Practice in Medieval Visionary Culture [The author analyzes differing approaches to visions within the medieval Church. One view encouraged visions through guided meditation, with Newman citing Christina of Markyate and Mechthild of Hackeborn as examples. The other predominant view rejected visualization and questioned the source of visions. During the later Middle Ages theologians became increasingly concerned about the danger of cultivated visions, especially those of women like Bridget of Sweden and other lay people influenced by the pseudo-Bonaventuran "Meditations on the Life of Christ." Ultimately the more critical approach to visions prevailed among the learned. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Speculum , 80., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 1 - 43.
Year of Publication: 2005.

7. Record Number: 8948
Author(s): Edsall, Mary Agnes.
Contributor(s):
Title : True Anchoresses are Called Birds: Asceticism as Ascent and the Purgative Mysticism of the "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 157 - 186.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 14255
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Ingesting Bodily Filth: Defilement in the Spirituality of Angela of Foligno [The author argues that Angela of Foligno ate scabs from lepers joyfully as a sacred act likened to the Eucharist. Morrison compares the similar experiences of Catherine of Siena, Francis of Assisi, and Catherine of Genoa but finds differing motives inclu
Source: Romance Quarterly , 50., 3 (Summer 2003):  Pages 204 - 216.
Year of Publication: 2003.

9. Record Number: 11830
Author(s): Swanson, R. N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Will the Real Margery Kempe Please Stand Up! [The author examines "The Book of Margery Kempe" for religion as it was experienced by women. Swanson cites in particular male roles in Margery's spiritual life, pilgrimage, the urban milieu, pardons and indulgences, heresy, and the influence of devotional literature read to Margery (who was likely illiterate). Swanson suggests that in some respects Margery was like many other lay women who were deeply concerned about their salvation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Romance Quarterly , 50., 3 (Summer 2003):  Pages 141 - 165.
Year of Publication: 2003.

10. Record Number: 9719
Author(s): Mecham, June L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Between the Lines: Compilation, Variation, and the Recovery of an Authentic Female Voice in the "Dornenkron" Prayer Books from Wienhausen
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 29., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 109 - 128.
Year of Publication: 2003.

11. Record Number: 11826
Author(s): Leyser, Henrietta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Word of God [The author briefly traces women's use of books from an eighth century Anglo-Saxon copy of the Pauline Epistles that has Ada's name inscribed to late medieval books of hours with illustrations of their female owners. At the same time Leyser reflects on affective piety and women's spirituality, particularly in connection with the book as metaphor for the Christian life as well as for the salvation offered by Christ. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Journal of Medieval History , 29., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 32 - 45.
Year of Publication: 2003.

12. Record Number: 10837
Author(s): Stjerna, Kirsi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Models of Medieval Mystics Today: Rethinking the Legacy of Birgitta of Sweden
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 12., ( 2002):  Pages 126 - 140.
Year of Publication: 2002.

13. Record Number: 7134
Author(s): Warren, Nancy Bradley.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monastic Politics: St. Colette of Corbie, Franciscan Reform, and the House of Burgundy
Source: New Medieval Literatures , 5., ( 2002):  Pages 203 - 228.
Year of Publication: 2002.

14. Record Number: 9512
Author(s): Wiethaus, Ulrike.
Contributor(s):
Title : Thieves and Carnivals: Gender in German Dominican Literature of the Fourteenth Century [The author examines two autobiographical vernacular texts from Margarete Ebner and Heinrich Seuse. She argues that Seuse was concerned in part with disciplining nuns under his care and showing that female spirituality was inferior to his more intellectual approach. Ebner, on the other hand, wrote a spiritual manual for the nuns in her house in order to enhance their daily practices. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. New Medieval Literatures , 5., ( 2002):  Pages 209 - 238.
Year of Publication: 2002.

15. Record Number: 10835
Author(s): Delio, Ilia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Clare of Assisi: Beauty and Transformation
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 12., ( 2002):  Pages 68 - 81.
Year of Publication: 2002.

16. Record Number: 5456
Author(s): Whitehead, Christiania.
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction--Medieval Spirituality and Gender [the author lays out the approach of the essays in "Writing Religious Women," the spirituality and textual practice of the women under consideration; furthermore she considers collections of essays published in the 1980s and 1990s that deal with medieval women].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000. Studies in Spirituality , 10., ( 2000):  Pages 6 - 10.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 4832
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Angela of Foligno: A Eucharistic Model of Lay Sanctity
Source: Lay Sanctity, Medieval and Modern: A Search for Models.   Edited by Ann W. Astell .   University of Notre Dame Press, 2000. Studies in Spirituality , 12., ( 2002):  Pages 61 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2000.

18. Record Number: 4838
Author(s): Matusevich, Yelena.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Monastic to Individual Spirituality: Another Perspective on Jean Gerson's Attitude Toward Women [the author argues against McGuire's interpretation in "Late Medieval Care and Control of Women: Jean Gerson and His Sisters" (Revue de l'Histoire Ecclésiastique, 92 (1997)) in which he characterizes Gerson as controlling and as a predecessor of the inquisitors in his desire for control over women].
Source: Magistra , 6., 1 (Summer 2000):  Pages 61 - 88.
Year of Publication: 2000.

19. Record Number: 5557
Author(s): Caciola, Nancy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mystics, Demoniacs, and the Physiology of Spirit Possession in Medieval Europe
Source: Comparative Studies in Society and History , 42., 2 (April 2000):  Pages 268 - 306.
Year of Publication: 2000.

20. Record Number: 5385
Author(s): Delio, Ilia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mirrors and Footprints: Metaphors of Relationship in Clare of Assisi's Writings
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 10., ( 2000):  Pages 167 - 181.
Year of Publication: 2000.

21. Record Number: 4713
Author(s): Sutera, Judith, O.S.B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Benedictine Spirituality in the Life and Works of Hildegard of Bingen
Source: Magistra , 5., 1 (Summer 1999):  Pages 3 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1999.

22. Record Number: 4723
Author(s): Nolte, Claudia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hildegard of Bingen and Ramon Lull: Two Approaches to Medieval Spirituality
Source: Magistra , 5., 2 (Winter 1999):  Pages 59 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 3077
Author(s): Sullivan, Joseph M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Brother Hermann's "Iolande": A Tale of Ideal Female Spirituality
Source: Monatshefte , 90., 2 (Summer 1998):  Pages 161 - 175.
Year of Publication: 1998.

24. Record Number: 2752
Author(s): Abbott, Christopher
Contributor(s):
Title : Piety and Egoism in Julian of Norwich: A Reading of Long Text Chapters 2 and 3 [The author analyzes a portion of text that represents the young Julian's affective spirituality; Julian hopes for the gift of touching Christ and other ways of participating in the crucifixion].
Source: Downside Review , 114., 397 (October 1996):  Pages 267 - 282.
Year of Publication: 1996.

25. Record Number: 1031
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Possessed by Pure Love: The Spirituality of Catherine of Genoa
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 6., ( 1996):  Pages 131 - 144.
Year of Publication: 1996.

26. Record Number: 702
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Listen Now All and Understand: Adaptation of Hagiographical Material for Vernacular Audiences in the Old English Lives of St. Margaret [contrasts a straightforward narrative with a version that emphasizes an affective spirituality].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 71, 1 (Jan. 1996): 27-42. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

27. Record Number: 1988
Author(s): Tipton, Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Toads on the Text: The Spirituality of Psalter Reading in the "Life of Christina of Markyate"
Source: Proceedings of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 3., ( 1995):  Pages 51 - 68.
Year of Publication: 1995.

28. Record Number: 1124
Author(s): Sutera, Judith, O.S.B. and Deborah. Vess
Contributor(s):
Title : Editorial [tribute to Margot King and her journal, Vox Benedictina]
Source: Magistra , 1., 1 (Summer 1995):  Pages 3 - 8.
Year of Publication: 1995.

29. Record Number: 1122
Author(s): Tinsley, David F.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Spirituality of Suffering in the Revelations of Elsbeth von Oye
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 21., 4 (December 1995):  Pages 121 - 147.
Year of Publication: 1995.

30. Record Number: 1309
Author(s): Rublack, Ulinka.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Spirituality and the Infant Jesus in Late Medieval Dominican Convents [Margaretha Ebner's experiences with an infant Jesus doll need to be understood within the contexts of her spiritual desire and her social condition as a nun].
Source: Gender and History , 6., 1 (April 1994):  Pages 37 - 57.
Year of Publication: 1994.

31. Record Number: 5516
Author(s): Hollywood, Amy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Suffering Transformed: Marguerite Porete, Meister Eckhart, and the Problem of Women's Spirituality [the author argues that both Porete and Eckhart questioned the value of asceticism, mystical phenomena, and visionary experiences, all associated with women's spirituality; they favored instead a move toward detachment and sought to relieve religious women's suffering].
Source: Meister Eckhart and the Beguine Mystics: Hadewijch of Brabant, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Marguerite Porete.   Edited by Bernard McGinn .   Continuum, 1994. Proceedings of the Medieval Association of the Midwest , 3., ( 1995):  Pages 87 - 113.
Year of Publication: 1994.

32. Record Number: 14768
Author(s): Johnson, Timothy J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Visual Imagery and Contemplation in Clare od Assisi's "Letters to Agnes of Prague"
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 19., 4 (December 1993):  Pages 161 - 172.
Year of Publication: 1993.

33. Record Number: 9067
Author(s): Olson, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Green Man in Hildegard of Bingen [In his analysis of the "Liber Divinorum Operum" ("Book of Divine Works"), the author argues that Hildegard's concept of "viriditas" plays a central role in her cosmology. Roughly equivalent to "greenness," the term refers to the creative force behind everything in the world; it sustains and reflects the salvific work that both men and women perform. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Mystica New Series , 15., 4 (Winter 1992):  Pages 3 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1992.

34. Record Number: 10242
Author(s): Mahoney, Dhira B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe’s Tears and the Power Over Language [Margery’s tears play a significant role in her attempt to define herself and her role in society. She communicates her unique status to others through her tears. Weeping marks her as a woman who is both of the world while remaining apart from it, and she demonstrates her power outside of language by means of her tears and prayers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Mystics Quarterly , 19., 4 (December 1993):  Pages 37 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1992.

35. Record Number: 10774
Author(s): Latré, Guido.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beguinages and Female Forms of Spiritual Life in the Low Countries: An Introductory Lecture to a Visit of the Leuven Beguinag
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Mystics Quarterly , 19., 4 (December 1993):  Pages 219 - 234.
Year of Publication: 1992.

36. Record Number: 10298
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Art, Enclosure and the "Cura Monialium": Prolegomena in the Guise of a Postscript [The author addresses the question of female spirituality in the Middle Ages by looking both at monastic architecture and female patronage within the visual arts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 108-134. Link InfoReprinted in The Visual and the Visionary: Art and Female Spirituality in Late Medieval Germany. By Jeffrey F. Hamburger. Zone Books, 1998. Pages 35-109.
Year of Publication: 1992.

37. Record Number: 10243
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Journey into Selfhood: Margery Kempe and Feminine Spirituality [The author reads Margery’s narrative of spiritual progression alongside feminist, psychological and theological accounts of how women achieve selfhood. This process involves self-negation, spiritual awakening, and self-naming. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992.  Pages 51 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1992.

38. Record Number: 10248
Author(s): Hopenwasser, Nanda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe, St. Bridget, and Marguerite d’Oingt: The Visionary Writer as Shaman [Visionary writers of medieval Europe performed many of the same functions that modern shamans do in communities outside the Western tradition. As creative artists, they serve as bridges between the eternal and temporal worlds, transferring information and spiritual healing from a higher power to human society. They are apart from society yet also derive power from their marginal position. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992.  Pages 165 - 187.
Year of Publication: 1992.

39. Record Number: 10018
Author(s): Harvey, Nancy Lenz.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe: writer as creature [The article suggests that Kempe views her written book as a physical manifestation of her own spiritual experience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 173 - 184.
Year of Publication: 1992.

40. Record Number: 10241
Author(s): Armstrong, Elizabeth Psakis.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Understanding by Feeling” in Margery Kempe’s Book [When Kempe’s writing is compared to the various devotional writers she mentions in her book (Richard Rolle, Julian of Norwich, Walter Hilton, Saints Bridget of Sweden and Catherine of Siena), it is clear that she borrows from both devotional and hagiographical traditions. She combines these traditions with other discourses in order to triumph over clerical authority and to enact her own new spirituality based on feeling. The author suggests that her religious practices are close to those of Protestants in later periods (including Pentecostal women). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 17 - 35.
Year of Publication: 1992.

41. Record Number: 10249
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe and the King’s Daughter of Hungary [In her “Book,” English mystic Margery Kempe adapts the text of another woman visionary, Saint Elizabeth of Hungary. Instances of devotional suffering, weeping, and self-martyrdom in Kempe’s book could be modeled on selected incidents in Elizabeth’s writings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 189 - 201.
Year of Publication: 1992.

42. Record Number: 10737
Author(s): Bynum, Caroline Walker.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Female Body and Religious Practice in the Later Middle Ages [The essay analyzes the theological implications of women’s bodies in the later Middle Ages, arguing that female flesh, created and redeemed by God, was also a means to encounter Him spiritually. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Human Body in Medieval Religion. Caroline Walker Bynum .   MIT Press, 1991. Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 59., 3 (Fall 1991):  Pages 181 - 238.
Year of Publication: 1991.

43. Record Number: 10979
Author(s): Hozeski, Bruce W.
Contributor(s):
Title : Faith: Hildegard von Bingen and Some of the Modern Theologians [The author compares modern definitions of faith with Hildegard’s, arguing that the medieval mystic and the modern theologians share much in common. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 17., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 20 - 26.
Year of Publication: 1991.

44. Record Number: 11204
Author(s): Baumer-Despeigne, Odette.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hadewijch of Antwerp and Hadewijch II; Mysticism of Being in the Thirteenth Century in Brabant [The poems of the female mystic Hadewijch of Antwerp, composed between 1220 and 1240, were revised and augmented by another beguine (member of a sisterhood of laywomen) a decade later. This collaboration reflects the contemporary social trend among laywomen in the Low Countries to voluntary take up a simple life of chastity and poverty without joining a religious order. Although the poems composed by the Hadewijchs are written in the language of the trouveres and courtly love, they express a deep spirituality and love for God (not men). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Mystica , 14., 4 (Winter 1991):  Pages 16 - 37.
Year of Publication: 1991.

45. Record Number: 11042
Author(s): Slade, Carole.
Contributor(s):
Title : Alterity in Union: The Mystical Experience of Angela of Foligno and Margery Kempe [The author explores the mystical visions of Angela of Foligno and Margery Kempe, arguing that through describing their transcendent unions with God, the women mystics gain subjectivity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Religion and Literature , 23., 3 (Autumn 1991):  Pages 109 - 126.
Year of Publication: 1991.

46. Record Number: 8661
Author(s): Craine, Renate.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hildegard of Bingen: "The Earth Hungers for the Fullness of Justice" [The author interprets Hildegard of Bingen’s "Liber Vitae Meritorum" as a call for present-day readers to make ecology a spiritual priority. The striking imagery in Hildegard’s writing reminds us that humans are in a relationship with God’s creation and are responsible for taking care of the environment. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cistercian Studies Quarterly , 26., 2 ( 1991):  Pages 120 - 126.
Year of Publication: 1991.

47. Record Number: 11202
Author(s): Fite, Patricia P.
Contributor(s):
Title : To “Sytt and Syng of Luf Langyng”: The Feminine Dynamic of Richard Rolle’s Mysticism [Richard Rolle combines masculine and feminine dimensions of spirituality in his mystical writings. He uses feminized language as an alternative to the discourse of clerical authority, invoking the language of “luf langyng” (yearning for love) to express the mystical union of body and soul and the intense desire for union with the divine. Rolle’s concept of spiritual integration and affinity with the feminine anticipates the psychic theories of Carl Jung. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Mystica , 14., 40212 (Summer/Fall 1991):  Pages 13 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1991.

48. Record Number: 10679
Author(s): Elliott, Dylan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dress as Mediator Between Inner and Outer Self: The Pious Matron of the High and Later Middle ages [Clothing often served as a saint's way of signifying the discrepancy between her percieved social standing (according to secular values) and her own individual selfhood (one based on spiritual beliefs). For married female saints, clothing was an even more complex form of symbolism as it often thwarted the wife's expected subordination to her husband while also projecting an image of virginity which was at odds with a married social persona. During the later Middle Ages, clergy began to endorse efforts to restrict the clothing of laywomen in order to maintain husbands' supremacy over their pious wives. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 53., ( 1991):  Pages 279 - 308.
Year of Publication: 1991.

49. Record Number: 11073
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Catherine of Siena: The Two Hungers [The article discusses the “spiritual hunger” that Catherine of Siena describes in her writings, a hunger usually sated by the Eucharist, and related to her practice of fasting. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 17., 3 ( 1991):  Pages 173 - 180.
Year of Publication: 1991.

50. Record Number: 10682
Author(s): Ross, Ellen M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Experience and Women's Autobiography: The Rhetoric of Selfhood in "The Book of Margery Kempe" [Kempe uses domestic and familial language as the dominant metaphors for describing her relationship with the divine and her mode of understanding, experiencing, and expressing the self. Not only does she use relational terms like "daughter," "mother," and "sister" to describe her connections to Christ and the Virgin Mary, but she also identifies herself with a tradition of holy women and, at other times, as a prophet. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 59., 3 (Fall 1991):  Pages 527 - 546.
Year of Publication: 1991.

51. Record Number: 11814
Author(s): Strauch, Gabriele L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mechthild von Magdeburg and the Category of Frauenmystik [The author considers the usefulness of the category “frauenmystik” (characterized by ecstatic experiences and uninhibited eroticism) by scrutinizing its application to Mechthild von Magdeburg. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women as Protagonists and Poets in the German Middle Ages: An Anthology of Feminist Approaches to Middle High German Literature.   Edited by Albrecht Classen .   Kümmerle Verlag, 1991. Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 59., 3 (Fall 1991):  Pages 171 - 186.
Year of Publication: 1991.

52. Record Number: 12696
Author(s): Schmitt, Miriam.
Contributor(s):
Title : Freed to Run with Expanded Heart: The Writings of Gertrud of Helfta and the Rule of Benedict [In her writings, Helfta interprets liberty of heart as a personal passage from inner bondage to spiritual freedom. She also exemplifies the qualities of a liberated heart which Benedict outlines in his regula. The author equates Gertrude's "libertas cordis" (liberated heart in mystical love) is equated with Benedict's "cor dilatatus" (heart expanded by ineffable love). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cistercian Studies , 25., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 220 - 232.
Year of Publication: 1990.

53. Record Number: 12749
Author(s): Ford-Grabowsky, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Angels and Archetypes: A Jungian Approach to Saint Hildegard [Jung’s psychological work on archetypes helps explain the elusive essence and role of angels in Christian theology. Hildegard’s vision of angels in her writings depict them as resembling archetypes in their dual nature, their affinity to divine energies, and their role in the individuation and salvation of the self. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: American Benedictine Review , 41., 1 ( 1990):  Pages 1 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1990.

54. Record Number: 12695
Author(s): Lewis, Gertrud Jaron.
Contributor(s):
Title : Libertas Cordis: The Concept of Inner Freedom in Saint Gertrud the Great of Helfta [Both the writings by and biographies of Saint Gertrud of Helfta (German nun and mystic) place supreme importance on inner freedom (freedom of spirit and freedom of heart). For Gertrud, striving for inner freedom and asceticism are intimately connected, and one paradoxically gains freedom by giving up oneself. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cistercian Studies , 25., 1 ( 1990):  Pages 65 - 74.
Year of Publication: 1990.

55. Record Number: 38816
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Crib of the Infant Jesus
Source: American Benedictine Review , 41., 1 ( 1990):
Year of Publication: