Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


136 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 33502
Author(s): Martínez de Toledo, Alonso
Contributor(s): Naylor, Eric W., trans. and Rank, Jerry R., trans.
Title : The Archpriest of Talavera: Dealing with the Vices of Wicked Women and the Complexions of Men
Source: The Archpriest of Talavera by Alonso Martínez de Toledo: Dealing with the Vices of Wicked Women and the Complexions of Men.   Edited by Eric W. Naylor and Jerry R. Rank .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2013.  Pages 25 - 224.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 36627
Author(s): Roig, Jaume,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Mirror of Jaume Roig
Source: The Mirror of Jaume Roig: An Edition and an English Translation of MS. Vat. Lat. 4806. Jaume Roig   Edited by Maria Celeste Delgado-Librero Medieval and Renaissance Texts and Studies .   ACMRS (Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies), 2010.  Pages 65 - 427.
Year of Publication: 2010.

3. Record Number: 15565
Author(s): Herzig, Tamar
Contributor(s):
Title : Witches, Saints, and Heretics: Heinrich Kramer's Ties with Italian Women Mystics [Heinrich Kramer is best known for the "Malleus malleficarum," which denounced women as prone to becoming witches. While disputing with heretics in Bohemia, Kramer argued that the holiness of four Dominican tertiaries in Ferrara proved the authenticity of the Church. Kramer's holy women all were given to bodily manifestations of piety, such as stigmata; but they were carefully regulated by friars. They were the mirror opposites of witches, saintly despite bodily appetites that might have led them into error. The heretics were unmoved by their example, but Kramer spread their fame even while the "Malleus" spread negative stereotypes of other women. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , 1., ( 2006):  Pages 24 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 19229
Author(s): Bueno, Irene
Contributor(s):
Title : Preferire l'eresia? Donne catare in Linguadoca nel primo Trecento [The histography of women Cathars usually focuses on the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, not on their declining numbers in the early fourteenth century. Evidence from Montaillou shows Cathar teachings transmitted within families. The women who converted often ignored misogynistic tenets of Catharism in favor of elements like belief that dead babies would experience reincarnation. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Storia delle donne 2 (2006): 243-266.
Year of Publication: 2006.

5. Record Number: 15807
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Jean Gerson and the Debate on the "Romance of the Rose" [Jean Gerson and Christine de Pizan both attacked the Roman de la Rose. Christine rejected the poem's misogyny, while Gerson thought reading it would inspire people to sin. The defenders of the text rejected Christine as a woman and Gerson as ignorant of literature. Both Christine and Gerson made a direct, causal link between reading and human conduct. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: A Companion to Jean Gerson.   Edited by Brian Patrick McGuire Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition: A Series of handbooks and reference works on the intellectual and religious life of Europe, 500-1700 .   Brill, 2006.  Pages 317 - 356.
Year of Publication: 2006.

6. Record Number: 19951
Author(s): Taylor, Craig
Contributor(s):
Title : The Salic Law, French Queenship, and the Defense of Women in the Late Middle Ages
Source: French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 543 - 564.
Year of Publication: 2006.

7. Record Number: 14689
Author(s): Bildhauer, Bettina.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Secrets of Women" (c. 1300): A Medieval Perspective on Menstruation [The author analyzes a fifteenth century German language translations of the natural philosophical text, the "Secrets of Women." It presents a system in which gender is defined by the body with men as the norm and women as dangerous, impure, and weak. Title note provided by Feminae.].
Source: Menstruation: A Cultural History.   Edited by Andrew Shail and Gillian Howie .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2005. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 65 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2005.

8. Record Number: 14123
Author(s): Bleyerveld, Yvonne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Powerful Women, Foolish Men: The Popularity of the "Power of Women" Topos in Art [The author briefly describes the subject matter, themes, and audiences for the Power of Women topos. Biblical stories and classical myths provided the narratives in which dominant women humiliated the men who were in love with them. Bleyerveld argues tha
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 166 - 175.
Year of Publication: 2005.

9. Record Number: 10855
Author(s): Huot, Sylvia
Contributor(s):
Title : Visualizing the Feminine in the "Roman de Perceforest": The Episode of the "Conte de la rose" [The author argues that in this episode the wife's love and loyalty are celebrated, while the knights who want to shame her husband are emasculated by her cleverness. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 193 - 206.
Year of Publication: 2004.

10. Record Number: 10984
Author(s): Harker, C. Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chrystis Kirk on the Grene and "Peblis to the Ploy": The Economy of Gender [In these two Middle Scots satires female misbehavior is defined as sexual license, whether it be peasant girls who are available to every man or the lower-class woman who thinks that she can entice a well-off merchant. Harker argues that anxieties over class distinction and the instability of the urban burghs are transferred to unruly, lower class female bodies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing.   Edited by Sarah M. Dunnigan, C. Marie Harker, and Evelyn S. Newlyn .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 31 - 46.
Year of Publication: 2004.

11. Record Number: 10933
Author(s): Osborn, Marijane
Contributor(s):
Title : Authorship and Sexual/Allegorical Violence in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose" [The author argues that while Jean de Meun's "Rose" calls attention to authorship and authority, it supports the privileges of patriarchy and the subordination of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 628 - 659.
Year of Publication: 2004.

12. Record Number: 10703
Author(s): Phelpstead, Carl,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Sexual Ideology of Hrólfs saga kraka [The author argues that "Hrólfs saga" embodies patriachal values influenced by Christian concerns. This homosocial world of men generally views women in a misogynist light. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 1 - 24.
Year of Publication: 2003.

13. Record Number: 16586
Author(s): Hults, Linda C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dürer's "Four Witches" Reconsidered [The author argues that Dürer's engraving should be viewed in conjunction with the "Malleus maleficarum" as part of the developing theory on women's sexuality and witchcraft. Hults suggests that Dürer cleverly combined a variety of visual allusions includ
Source: Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Jane L. Carroll and Alison G. Stewart .   Ashgate, 2003. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 94 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2003.

14. Record Number: 6836
Author(s): McKenzie, Rosalind.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Image in Russian Medieval Literature [The author presents a brief overview of conditions for women in medieval Russia. She then analyzes several notable medieval literary portrayals including that of Princess Ol'ga of Kiev, the mother of Feodosi of the Kievan Caves, and Fevroniia, the wise peasant girl who marries a prince. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women's Writing in Russia.   Edited by Adele Marie Barker and Jehanne M. Gheith .   Cambridge University Press, 2002.  Pages 16 - 36.
Year of Publication: 2002.

15. Record Number: 8081
Author(s): Migiel, Marilyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Domestic Violence in the "Decameron" [The author examines Emilia's story about Melisso and Giosefo in the "Decameron." They both receive advice from Solomon who advocates wife beating. The story ends with the narrator Emilia offening justifications for violence against women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 164 - 179.
Year of Publication: 2002.

16. Record Number: 8083
Author(s): Najemy, John M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Giannozzo and His Elders: Alberti's Critique of Renaissance Patriarchy [The author argues that the figure of Giannozzo is used by Alberti to criticize the arbitrary power of fathers over sons and the resulting efforts of sons to control their wives, thereby recuperating some of their lost masculinity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Society and Individual in Renaissance Florence.   Edited by William J. Connell .   University of California Press, 2002. Scandinavian Studies , 75., 1 (Spring 2003):  Pages 51 - 78.
Year of Publication: 2002.

17. Record Number: 9340
Author(s): Broedel, Hans Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : To Preserve the Manly Form from So Vile a Crime: Ecclesiastical Anti-Sodomitic Rhetoric and the Gendering of Witchcraft in the "Malleus Maleficarum" [Broedel argues that Heinrich Krämer, the author, with the help of Jacob Sprenger, of the "Malleus maleficarum," adopted the language and critiques of sodomy to describe witchcraft, thus making it a crime of deviant sexuality. Since women were naturally predisposed to witchcraft due to weaknesses in their nature, they were lured into sexual sins with demons. Men who were enchanted by witches lost their potency or became emasculated. Using these kinds of arguments, Krämer created a witch that was much more threatening than in other contemporary tracts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 136-148. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

18. Record Number: 6219
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Visualizing the Feminine in the Roman de Perceforest
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002.
Year of Publication: 2002.

19. Record Number: 9339
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Feminization of Magic and the Emerging Idea of the Female Witch in the Late Middle Ages [This article explores Johannes Nider's text "Formicarius," written around 1437, and the first to state that women were more likely to be witches. Previously theologians had expressed concern over necromancy performed by learned men. However, women now posed a threat because their natures suited them to witchcraft, a feminized form of magic requiring sexual submission to the devil. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 120-134. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

20. Record Number: 6226
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Por coi la pucele pleure: A Misogynistic Quest of the Holy Grail?
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002.
Year of Publication: 2002.

21. Record Number: 8282
Author(s): Cortijo Ocaña, Antonio.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Consells- Consejos" on Marriage and Their Broader Sentimental Context [The author examines three works of advice on marriage ("Advice of Good Doctrine which a French lady Gave Her Daughter Who Married the King of England" ("Conseyll de bones doctrines que una reyna de França dona a una filla sua que fonch muller del rey Danglaterra"), "Letter from the Marquis of Villena to His Daughter Joana" ("Letra deval scrita feu lo marques de Villena e compte de Ribagortça qui apres fo intitulat duch de Gandia, per dona Joahan filla sua quant la marida ab don Johan fill del compte de Gardona, per la qual liscrivi castich e bons nodriments, dient axi"), and "Advice from a Wiseman to His Daughters" ("Castigos y dotrinas que un sabio daba a sus hijas")) that bear structured and thematic parallels to sentimental romances. The texts emphasize women's chastity, honor, humility, and piety, but also stress a misogynous view of women's out-of-control sexuality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Marriage and Sexuality in Medieval and Early Modern Iberia. Hispanic Issues, Volume 26.   Edited by Eukene Lacarra Lanz .   Routledge, 2002.  Pages 39 - 56.
Year of Publication: 2002.

22. Record Number: 8055
Author(s): Sheerin, Daniel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sisters in the Literary Agon: Texts from Communities of Women on the Mortuary Roll of the Abbess Matilda of La Trinité, Caen [The author provides a brief introduction to the mortuary roll for Matilda, abbess of la Trinité monastery in Caen. Mortuary rolls announced the deaths of prominent religious women and men and provided space for monasteries and cathedrals to record prayers and commemorative poems. The author suggests that groups competed for the most elegant and rhetorically inventive entries. He also suggests that poems written by nuns may have prompted the misogynous comments in several of the entries from male religious communities. Latin texts and English translations follow of Matilda's obituary notice and the poems on the mortuary roll from women's communities. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women Writing Latin from Roman Antiquity to Early Modern Europe. Volume 2: Medieval Women Writing Latin.   Edited by Laurie J. Churchill, Phyllis R. Brown, and Jane E. Jeffrey .   Routledge, 2002.  Pages 93 - 131.
Year of Publication: 2002.

23. Record Number: 5971
Author(s): Lees, Clare A. and Gillian R. Overing
Contributor(s):
Title : The Clerics and the Critics: Women and Rhetoric in Anglo-Saxon England
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001.
Year of Publication: 2001.

24. Record Number: 4467
Author(s): Menuge, Noël James.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Few Home Truths: The Medieval Mother as Guardian in Romance and Law [The author examines the roles of mothers and step-mothers in legal treatises and wardship romances; both genres favor the interests of a patrilineal, primogenitive feudal society by showing family members as untrustworthy and only the lord as reliable].
Source: Medieval Women and the Law.   Edited by Noël James Menuge .   Boydell Press, 2000. Gender and History , 12., 1 (April 2000):  Pages 77 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2000.

25. Record Number: 4807
Author(s): Lloyd-Morgan, Ceridwen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Querelle des Femmes": A Continuing Tradition in Welsh Women's Literature [the author analyzes a poem by the woman author Gwerful Mechain in which she responds to a diatribe against women by the male poet Ieuan Dyfi; Gwenful Mechain cites women fromWelsh history, the Bible and the classical tradition all who had important achievements].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000.  Pages 101 - 114.
Year of Publication: 2000.

26. Record Number: 4764
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodily Peril: Sexuality and the Subversion of Order in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Modern Language Review , 95., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 41 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2000.

27. Record Number: 4635
Author(s): Berman, Constance H.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Labours of Hercules," the Cartulary, Church, and Abbey for Nuns of la Cour- Notre- Dame- de- Michery
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 26., 1 (March 2000):  Pages 33 - 70.
Year of Publication: 2000.

28. Record Number: 15185
Author(s): Cubitt, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virginity and Misogyny in Tenth- and Eleventh-Century England
Source: Gender and History , 12., 1 (April 2000):  Pages 1 - 32.
Year of Publication: 2000.

29. Record Number: 4596
Author(s): van Houts, Elisabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Authority of Oral Witnesses in Europe (800- 1300) [The author examines women's participation in legal cases; only under certain circumstances could women testify; canon lawyers were hostile towards women, while secular lawyers, such as Philippe de Beaumanoir, were more lenient].
Source: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. Sixth Series , 9., ( 1999):  Pages 201 - 220.
Year of Publication: 1999.

30. Record Number: 3773
Author(s): Mirrer, Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Representation in Male-Authored Works of the Middle Age [The author briefly discusses three subject areas in which male-authored texts need to be considered: the body, religious literature, and literature in which race and class come into play].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999. Gender and History , 12., 1 (April 2000):  Pages 315 - 330.
Year of Publication: 1999.

31. Record Number: 4884
Author(s): Ambrosio, Francis J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminist Self-Fashioning: Christine de Pizan and "The Treasure of the City of Ladies"
Source: European Journal of Women's Studies , 6., 1 (February 1999):  Pages 9 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1999.

32. Record Number: 4371
Author(s): Pratt, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Translating Misogamy: The Authority of the Intertext in the "Lamentationes Matheoluli" and Its Middle French Translation [The author highlights the role that Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose " plays in LeFevre's efforts to expand and enliven the antifeminist content].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 35., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 421 - 435.
Year of Publication: 1999.

33. Record Number: 4504
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Women is Like… [the author examines three heroines in Chrétien de Troyes and Marie de France; she argues that they are compared to horses and birds in order to indicate their unreliable sexuality]
Source: Romance Quarterly , 46., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 67 - 73.
Year of Publication: 1999.

34. Record Number: 4276
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Blood and Rosaries: Virginity, Violence, and Desire in Chaucer's "Prioress's Tale"
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Romance Quarterly , 46., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 181 - 198.
Year of Publication: 1999.

35. Record Number: 3964
Author(s): Gaynor, Stephanie.
Contributor(s):
Title : He Says, She Says: Subjectivity and the Discourse of the Other in the "Prioress's Portrait" and "Tale"
Source: Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 5., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 375 - 390.
Year of Publication: 1999.

36. Record Number: 4278
Author(s): Hayward, Rebecca.
Contributor(s):
Title : Between the Living and the Dead: Widows as Heroines of Medieval Romances
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Medieval Encounters: Jewish, Christian, and Muslim Culture in Confluence and Dialogue , 5., 3 ( 1999):  Pages 221 - 243.
Year of Publication: 1999.

37. Record Number: 5549
Author(s): Beresford, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Saints and Sanctity in "Celestina" [The speaker argues that the character Sempronio's allusion to Bernard in his misogynist diatribe is not referring to Bernard of Clairvaux but to Bernard of Cabrera, a fifteenth-century Spanish nobleman who lost favor with the King and was publicly humiliated by his lover].
Source: Celestinesca , 23., 40180 ( 1999):  Pages 158 - 159.
Year of Publication: 1999.

38. Record Number: 3772
Author(s): Whitney, Elspeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Witches, Saints and Other "Others": Women and Deviance in Medieval Culture [The author provides an introductory overview of the ideas about women that set the stage for the witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999. Celestinesca , 23., 40180 ( 1999):  Pages 295 - 312.
Year of Publication: 1999.

39. Record Number: 4383
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Satirical Views of the Beguines in Northern French Literature [the author briefly analyzes the writings of Gautier de Coincy, Guillaume de St. Amour, Rutebeuf, and Jean de Meun among others; the criticisms of the beguines focus on their sexuality, desire to preach and teach, association with mendicants, and talkativeness].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999. Celestinesca , 23., 40180 ( 1999):  Pages 237 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1999.

40. Record Number: 4481
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Traittié tout de mençonges: The "Secrés des dames," "Trotula," and Attitudes toward Women's Medicine in Fourteenth- and Early-Fifteenth-Century France
Source: Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference.   Edited by Marilynn Desmond .   University of Minnesota Press, 1998. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. Sixth Series , 9., ( 1999):  Pages 146 - 178. Later reprinted in Women's Healthcare in the Medieval West: Texts and Contexts. Monica H. Green. Variorum Collected Studies Series, CS680. Ashgate Publishing, 2000, VI:146-178.
Year of Publication: 1998.

41. Record Number: 3142
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender Difference and Indifference in the Writings of Pope Innocent III
Source: Gender and Christian religion: papers read at the 1996 Summer Meeting and the 1997 Winter Meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society.   Edited by R. N. Swanson Studies in Church History, 34.  1998. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. Sixth Series , 9., ( 1999):  Pages 105 - 117.
Year of Publication: 1998.

42. Record Number: 3367
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Misogyny in a Medieval University? The "Hoc contra malos" Commentary on Walter Map's "Dissuasio Valerii" [the commentator makes no attempt to develop or justify the bigotry expressed by Map against women].
Source: Journal of Medieval Latin , 8., ( 1998):  Pages 156 - 191.
Year of Publication: 1998.

43. Record Number: 4353
Author(s): Paxson, James J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Nether-Faced Devil and the Allegory of Parturition [The author argues that the representation of the devil with a face in place of its genitals draws on the allegory of childbirth and thereby demonizes the female sexual body].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 19., ( 1998):  Pages 139 - 176.
Year of Publication: 1998.

44. Record Number: 5344
Author(s): Porter, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rhetorical Phallacies: The Poetics of Misogyny in Jean de Meun's Discourse of Nature
Source: Mediaevalia , 22., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 59 - 77. Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1998.

45. Record Number: 4477
Author(s): Case, Mary Anne C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and the Authority of Experience [The author argues that Christine was one of several "knowing and singular" feminists in the medieval and early modern periods who maintained that exceptional women should be considered exemplars who demonstrate the potential of all women].
Source: Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference.   Edited by Marilynn Desmond .   University of Minnesota Press, 1998. Mediaevalia , 22., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 71 - 87.
Year of Publication: 1998.

46. Record Number: 13758
Author(s): Schulenburg, Jane Tibbetts.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender, Celibacy, and Proscriptions of Sacred Space: Symbol and Practice [In the early and high Middle Ages women were regularly excluded from men's monasteries and from their churches, which held the relics and tombs of many saints. In some cases, monks made accommodations with separate oratories for women or special exceptions for queens and other highly-placed figures. Nevertheless, there are recorded incidents of women who ignored the monastic rules and entered areas forbidden to all females. Schulenburg suggests that in some cases, at least, women considered the rules only man-made and sought equal access to the tombs and relics of the saints. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Purity and Piety: Essays on Medieval Clerical Celibacy and Religious Reform.   Edited by Michael Frassetto Garland Medieval Casebooks Series .   Garland Publishing, 1998. Mediaevalia , 22., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 353 - 376.
Year of Publication: 1998.

47. Record Number: 3488
Author(s): Gates, Laura Doyle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Distaff and Pen: Producing the Evangiles des Quenouilles
Source: Neophilologus , 81., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 13 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1997.

48. Record Number: 4344
Author(s): Biller, Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cathars and Material Women [The author explores the historiography of the issue and calls into question the idea that Cathars offered positive roles for women].
Source: Medieval Theology and the Natural Body.   Edited by Peter Biller and A.J. Minnis York Studies in Medieval Theology .   York Medieval Press, 1997. Neophilologus , 81., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 61 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1997.

49. Record Number: 2478
Author(s): Sullivan, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Inquisitorial Origins of Literary Debate [argues that Christine and her opponents, Gontier and Pierre Col and Jean de Montreuil, in the "Querrelle de la Rose" all used inquisitorial rhetoric and branded the opposite side as heretics in need of salvation].
Source: Romanic Review , 88., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 27 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1997.

50. Record Number: 1994
Author(s): Calabrese, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ovid and the Female Voice in the "De Amore" and the "Letters" of Abelard and Heloise
Source: Modern Philology (Full Text via JSTOR) 95, 1 (August 1997): 1-26. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

51. Record Number: 2461
Author(s): Ross, Valerie A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Believing Cassandra: Intertextual Politics and the Interpretation of Dreams in "Troilus and Criseyde" [argues for a reading of Chaucer as resisting a legacy of notions about gender, authority, and agency; Chaucer makes an alliance with his female characters against misogyny].
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 339 - 356.
Year of Publication: 1997.

52. Record Number: 1379
Author(s): Solomon, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women Healers and the Power to Disease in Late Medieval Spain [Roig tells how women feign disease in order to trick their husbands and recounts stories of women healers who are incompetent and dangerous].
Source: Women Healers and Physicians: Climbing a Long Hill.   Edited by Lilian R. Furst .   University Press of Kentucky, 1997. Chaucer Review , 31., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 79 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1997.

53. Record Number: 2421
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sharing Wine, Women, and Song: Masculine Identity Formation in the Medieval European Universities
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Chaucer Review , 31., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 187 - 202.
Year of Publication: 1997.

54. Record Number: 2068
Author(s): Sydie, R.A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Phallocentric Gaze: Leon Battista Alberti and Visual Art
Source: Journal of Historical Sociology , 10., 3 (September 1997):  Pages 310 - 341.
Year of Publication: 1997.

55. Record Number: 1205
Author(s): Suranyi, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fifteenth-Century Woman's Pathway to Fame: The "Querelle de la Rose" and the Literary Career of Christine de Pizan
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 23., ( 1997):  Pages 204 - 221.
Year of Publication: 1997.

56. Record Number: 1934
Author(s): Lansing, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Civic Authority: Sexual Control in a Medieval Italian Town
Source: Journal of Social History , 31., 1 (Fall 1997):  Pages 33 - 59.
Year of Publication: 1997.

57. Record Number: 2099
Author(s): Nip, Renée.
Contributor(s):
Title : It's a Man's World: Recent Studies of Male Representation of the Female in the Middle Ages [book reviews][reviews nine books].
Source: Gender and History , 9., 1 (April 1997):  Pages 130 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1997.

58. Record Number: 2465
Author(s): Smith, Warren S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath Debates Jerome [argues that the Wife of Bath takes a centrist position on marriage and cleverly refutes the extreme misogyny of Jerome's "Adversus Jovinianum" and the classical tradition of anti-woman diatribe upon which he draws].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 2 ( 1997):  Pages 129 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1997.

59. Record Number: 2464
Author(s): Warner, Lawrence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman is Man's Babylon: Chaucer's "Nembrot" and the Tyranny of Enclosure in the "Nun's Priest's Tale" [gendered analysis of "wandering" (sexual, narrative, and linguistic) discusses several themes including woman as tyrant, transgressive sexuality, and the dangerous influence of Biblical translations on women].
Source: Chaucer Review , 32., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 82 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1997.

60. Record Number: 408
Author(s): Fadel, Mohammad.
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Women, One Man : Knowledge, Power, and Gender in Medieval Sunni Legal Thought [analysis of women's varied roles in the "production, reproduction, and application" of law as reflected both in exegesis and jurisprudence].
Source: International Journal of Middle East Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 2 (May 1997): 185-204. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

61. Record Number: 409
Author(s): Merguerian, Gayane Karen and Afsaneh Najmabadi
Contributor(s):
Title : Zulaykha and Yusuf: Whose "Best Story"? [drawing on the Qur'an, early commentaries, and medieval popular stories, the authors analyze the character and motives of Zulaykha (Potiphan's Wife); the theme of women's guile and deceit becomes more pronounced in each succeeding version of the story].
Source: International Journal of Middle East Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 4 (November 1997): 485-508. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

62. Record Number: 647
Author(s): O' Connor, Eugene.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hell's Pit and Heaven's Rose: The Typology of Female Sights and Smells in Panormita's "Hermaphroditus"
Source: Medievalia Et Humanistica New Series , 23., ( 1996):  Pages 25 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1996.

63. Record Number: 3647
Author(s): Nouvet, Claire.
Contributor(s):
Title : Writing (In) Fear [The author analyzes Christine's authorial personae, Cupid and Creintis(Fear); in writing her defense of women Christine must speak as a man].
Source: Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages.   Edited by Jane Chance .   University Press of Florida, 1996. Neophilologus , 81., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 279 - 305.
Year of Publication: 1996.

64. Record Number: 2989
Author(s): Keller, Kimberly.
Contributor(s):
Title : For Better and Worse: Women and Marriage in "Piers Plowman"
Source: Medieval Family Roles: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Cathy Jorgensen Itnyre .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Neophilologus , 81., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 67 - 83.
Year of Publication: 1996.

65. Record Number: 1343
Author(s): Kennedy, Beverly.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cambridge MS. DD.4.24: A Misogynous Scribal Revision of the "Wife of Bath's Prologue"?
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 4 ( 1996):  Pages 343 - 358.
Year of Publication: 1996.

66. Record Number: 669
Author(s): Neville, Grace.
Contributor(s):
Title : Short Shrouds and Sharp Shrews: Echoes of Jacques de Vitry in the "Dánta Grádha" [exemplum about the wife who skimps on her husband's funeral].
Source: The Fragility of Her Sex?: Medieval Irishwomen in Their European Context.   Edited by Christine Meek and Katherine Simms .   Four Courts Press, 1996. Chaucer Review , 30., 4 ( 1996):  Pages 87 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1996.

67. Record Number: 907
Author(s): Martines, Lauro.
Contributor(s):
Title : Amour et histoire dans la poésie de la Renaissance italienne [love poetry was influenced by many factors including religious beliefs, local tensions, ambition, patronage, social class, and misogyny].
Source: Annales : Histoire, Sciences Sociales , 51., 3 (mai-juin 1996):  Pages 575 - 603.
Year of Publication: 1996.

68. Record Number: 13836
Author(s): Hanna, Ralph, III
Contributor(s):
Title : Brewing Trouble: On Literature and History -- and Alewives [The author critically examines Judith Bennett's analysis of alewives in Middle English literature, in particular in Langland's "Piers Plowman." Hanna argues that misogyny is just one factor animating the portrayals and points to a distrust of people in the food trade, a concern with profit over and above a proper return, and the need to restrain pleasure. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Bodies and Disciplines: Intersections of Literature and History in Fifteenth-Century England.   Edited by Barbara A. Hanawalt and David Wallace .   Medieval Cultures series, 9. University of Minnesota Press, 1996. Annales : Histoire, Sciences Sociales , 51., 3 (mai-juin 1996):  Pages 1 - 17.
Year of Publication: 1996.

69. Record Number: 2702
Author(s): Ross, Valerie A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Resisting Chaucerian Misogyny: Reinscribing Criseyde [argues that Chaucer is a gender-conscious social visionary who seeks to subvert the "auctores" and the misogynist ideology in his transgressive alliance with Criseyde].
Source: Aestel , 4., ( 1996):  Pages 29 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1996.

70. Record Number: 1219
Author(s): Lundy, Anita.
Contributor(s):
Title : Carnality and Witchcraft: The Salaciousness of Women as a Foundation for the "Malleus Maleficarium"
Source: Magistra , 2., 1 (Summer 1996):  Pages 63 - 87.
Year of Publication: 1996.

71. Record Number: 1583
Author(s): Schibanoff, Susan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Worlds Apart: Orientalism, Antifeminism, and Heresy in Chaucer's "Man of Law's Tale" [heresy includes both Islam and the Lollard movement which is mentioned in the "Epilogue" to the "Man of Law's Tale"].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 59 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1996.

72. Record Number: 728
Author(s): Blumenfeld- Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Femme de Corps et Femme Par Sens: Christine de Pizan's Saintly Women
Source: Romanic Review , 87., 2 (March 1996):  Pages 157 - 175.
Year of Publication: 1996.

73. Record Number: 9517
Author(s): Cox, Catherine S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Jangler's "Bourde": Gender, Renunciation, and Chaucer's Manciple [The author argues that the Manciple speaks in his mother's voice to emphasize anti-feminist themes. The kinds of indirect language used by the Manciple fit in with the "Parson's Tale" and the "Retractions," suggesting a resistant reading of Chaucer's reaction to orthodox theology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: South Atlantic Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 61, 4 (Fall 1996): 1-21. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

74. Record Number: 1581
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Yf Wommen Be Double Naturelly: Remaking "Woman" in Julian of Norwich's "Revelation of Love" [Julian emphasizes fidelity, sensuality, as a human rather than a uniquely female condition, and God-as-Mother in response to antifeminist themes concerning woman's duplicity and destructiveness].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 1 - 34.
Year of Publication: 1996.

75. Record Number: 375
Author(s): Jambeck, Karen K.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reclaiming the Woman in the Book: Marie de France and the "Fables" [Marie de France replaces misogyny in Fables' sources with a more balanced view of women].
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 119 - 137.
Year of Publication: 1995.

76. Record Number: 1612
Author(s): Fabrié, Marie- Luce.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images de la femme dans les consoles sculptées de la fin du gothique en Languedoc Oriental
Source: La Femme dans l' histoire et la société méridionales (IXe-XIXe S.): Actes du 66e congrés. .   Fédération historique du Languedoc méditerranéen et du Roussillon, 1995. Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 243 - 254.
Year of Publication: 1995.

77. Record Number: 2822
Author(s): Lauwers, Michel.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'institution et le genre. À propos de l'accès des femmes au sacré dans l'Occident médiéval [traces the history of women forbidden access to the holy by the Church; studies the special cases of Beguines and other "mulieres religiosae" as well as female mystics; control by priests is maintained in all cases].
Source: CLIO, Histoire, Femmes et Sociétés , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 279 - 317.
Year of Publication: 1995.

78. Record Number: 6016
Author(s): Furlan, Francesco.
Contributor(s):
Title : L'idea della donna nella cultura della prima metà del Quattrocento toscano [for the Middle Ages we have vastly more material written by men than by women, and the evidence is skewed in favor of the upper classes; much of early and high medieval writing on women was influenced by the misogyny of Jerome and favored celibacy; late medieval theologians came to speak more highly of marriage and the family, but they still favored discipline as the ideal for women; the humanists placed even greater emphasis on marriage; Italian merchants placed a great emphasis on procreation, but their memoirs can speak of wives in loving terms].
Source: Ilaria del Carretto e il suo monumento: la donna nell'arte, la cultura, e la società del '400. Atti del convegno Internazionale di Studi, 15-16-17 Settembre, 1994, Palazzo Ducale, Lucca.   Edited by Stéphane Toussaint. Translated by Clotilde Soave Bowe. .   Edizioni S. Marco Litotipo, 1995. CLIO, Histoire, Femmes et Sociétés , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 251 - 270.
Year of Publication: 1995.

79. Record Number: 634
Author(s): Townshend, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Omissions, Emissions, Missionaries, and Master Signifiers in Norman Canterbury [gender in Goscelin's life of St. Augustine of Canterbury].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 2 (Fall 1995):  Pages 291 - 315.
Year of Publication: 1995.

80. Record Number: 354
Author(s): Bartlett, Anne Clark.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Reasonable Affection: Gender and Spiritual Friendship in Middle English Devotional Literature
Source: Vox Mystica: Essays on Medieval Mysticism in Honor of Professor Valerie M Lagorio.   Edited by Anne Clark Bartlett, Thomas H. Bestul, Janet Goebel, and William F. Pollard .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 2 (Fall 1995):  Pages 131 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1995.

81. Record Number: 582
Author(s): McNamara, Jo Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : Canossa and the Ungendering of the Public Man [men in religion and politics both acted to eliminate women's access to power and create a public space without women].
Source: Render Unto Caesar: The Religious Sphere in World Politics.   Edited by Sabrina Petra Ramet and Donald W. Treadgold .   American University Press, 1995. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 2 (Fall 1995):  Pages 131 - 150. Later published in Medieval Religion: New Approaches. Edited by Constance Hoffman Berman. Routledge, 2005. Pages 102-122.
Year of Publication: 1995.

82. Record Number: 343
Author(s): Kennedy, Beverly.
Contributor(s):
Title : Variant Passages in the Wife of Bath's Prologue and the Textual Transmission of the "Canterbury Tales": The "Great Tradition" Revisited
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 7., 2 (Fall 1995):  Pages 85 - 101.
Year of Publication: 1995.

83. Record Number: 2049
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer and Jean Le Fèvre [influences of Le Fèvre's "Lamentations de Matheolus" and "Livre de Leësce" on Chaucer's "Legend of Good Women," all of which share a double focus on good women and the bad men who deceive them].
Source: Archiv für das Studium der neueren Sprachen und Literaturen , 232., ( 1995):  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1995.

84. Record Number: 150
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Case of the Beata Simona: Iconography, Hagiography, and Misogyny in Three Paintings by Taddeo di Bartolo
Source: Art History , 18., 2 (June 1995):  Pages 154 - 184.
Year of Publication: 1995.

85. Record Number: 153
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Good Women and Bonnes Dames: Virtuous Females in Chaucer and Christine de Pizan
Source: Chaucer Review , 30., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 58 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1995.

86. Record Number: 347
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Italian Hussies and German Matrons: Luitprand of Cremona on Dynastic Legitimacy [Luitprand's charges of sexual improprieties against Lombard queens were part of Otto I's political strategy].
Source: Frühmittelalterliche Studien , 29., ( 1995):  Pages 207 - 225. Jahrbuch des Instituts für Frühmittelalterforschung der Universität Münster
Year of Publication: 1995.

87. Record Number: 237
Author(s): García Teruel, Gabriela.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les opinions sur la femme dans quelques récits des XIIe et XIIIe siècles
Source: Moyen Age , 101., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 23 - 39.
Year of Publication: 1995.

88. Record Number: 1720
Author(s): Brown-Grant, Rosalind.
Contributor(s):
Title : Des hommes et des femmes illustres : modalités narratives et transformations génériques chez Pétrarque, Boccace, et Christine de Pizan
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Moyen Age , 101., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 469 - 480.
Year of Publication: 1995.

89. Record Number: 583
Author(s): Eadie, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath's Non- Hengwrt Lines: Chaucerian Revision or Editorial Meddling? [differences in manuscript versions of the "Wife of Bath's Prologue" may be the result of Chaucer's revisions or more likely the additions of an early anti- feminist emender]
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 96., ( 1995):  Pages 169 - 176.
Year of Publication: 1995.

90. Record Number: 4333
Author(s): Copeland, Rita.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Women Can't Read: Medieval Hermeneutics, Statutory Law, and the Lollard Heresy Trials
Source: Representing Women: Law, Literature, and Feminism.   Edited by Susan Sage Heinzelman and Zipporah Batshaw Wiseman .   Duke University Press, 1994.  Pages 253 - 286.
Year of Publication: 1994.

91. Record Number: 1740
Author(s): Dishon, Judith.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Women in Medieval Hebrew Literature [emphasis on the many negative representations which the author categorizes in three sets: fearfulness and cruelty, laziness and greed or gluttony, and stupidity and shrewdness or deceitfulness].
Source: Women of the Word: Jewish Women and Jewish Writing.   Edited by Judith R. Baskin .   Wayne State University Press, 1994. CLIO, Histoire, Femmes et Sociétés , 2., ( 1995):  Pages 35 - 49.
Year of Publication: 1994.

92. Record Number: 1490
Author(s): Knickerbocker, Dale F.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Legend of the "Siete Infantes de Lara" and the Problem of "Antifeminismo" [the figures of Lambra and Sancha oppose evil with good; Lambra transgresses the social order with her sexual aggressiveness and usurpation of authority while Sancha supports the patriarchal order as a faithful wife and self-sacrificing mother who only assumes control in the absence of men].
Source: Corónica , 23., 1 (Fall 1994):  Pages 12 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1994.

93. Record Number: 3554
Author(s): McNamara, Jo Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Herrenfrage" : The Restructuring of the Gender System, 1050-1150
Source: Medieval Masculinities: Regarding Men in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Clare A. Lees with the assistance of Thelma Fenster and Jo Ann McNamara Medieval Cultures, 7.   University of Minnesota Press, 1994. Corónica , 23., 1 (Fall 1994):  Pages 3 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1994.

94. Record Number: 5518
Author(s): Woods, Richard, O. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Conclusion: Women and Men in the Development of Late Medieval Mysticism [The author briefly considers some of the female mystics whose writings influenced Eckhart, including Hadewijch of Antwerp, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Marguerite Porete].
Source: Meister Eckhart and the Beguine Mystics: Hadewijch of Brabant, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Marguerite Porete.   Edited by Bernard McGinn .   Continuum, 1994. Corónica , 23., 1 (Fall 1994):  Pages 147 - 164.
Year of Publication: 1994.

95. Record Number: 8482
Author(s): Kay, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Body of Knowledge: Epistemology and Misogyny in the "Romance of the Rose" [The author situates Jean de Meun's epistemology and misogyny within the intellectual currents and direct literary sources of the "Roman de la Rose," including Boethius, Alan de Lille, and the neo-Aristotelians. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Corónica , 23., 1 (Fall 1994):  Pages 211 - 235.
Year of Publication: 1994.

96. Record Number: 2606
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jean le Fèvre's "Livre de Leesce": Praise or Blame of Women? [Le Fèvre wrote "Leesce" as a refutation of the text he had earlier translated, the misogynous "Lamentations of Matheolus" ; despite his varied strategies to praise women, Blumenfeld-Kosinski judges his efforts a partial failure because he gives too much consideration to the anti-female diatribes of Matheolus and falls into the trap of stereotyping women].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 69, 3 (July 1994): 705-725. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

97. Record Number: 11421
Author(s): Laennec, Christine Moneera.
Contributor(s):
Title : Unladylike Polemics: Christine de Pizan's Strategies of Attack and Defense [The author discusses Pizan's methods of argumentation. By claiming female weakness and the persona of a virgin martyr, she put her attackers at a decided disadvantage. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature (Full Text via JSTOR) 12, 1 (Spring 1993): 47-59. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1993.

98. Record Number: 6245
Author(s): Diamond, Arlyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Revelations and Re-evaluations: Medieval Women [the author argues that the four books under review (Helen Damico and Alexandra Hennessey Olsen, eds., "New Readings on Women in Old English Literature;" Bella Millet and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, eds., "Medieval English Prose for Women: Selections from the 'Katherine Group' and 'Ancrene Wisse;'" Joel T. Rosenthal, ed., "Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History;" and Katharina M. Wilson and Elizabeth M. Makowski, "Wykked Wyves and the Woes of Marriage: Misogamous Literature from Juvenal to Chaucer") demonstrate that the study of women in the Middle Ages has reached a new level of understanding, more nuanced and specific than in the past].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 19., ( 1993):  Pages 147 - 158.
Year of Publication: 1993.

99. Record Number: 7184
Author(s): Touliatos, Diane.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Traditional Role of Greek Women in Music from Antiquity to the End of the Byzantine Empire [The author provides a brief overview of women in music in the Greek world. The Byzantine women profiled all composed liturgical music including Martha, Theodosia, Thekla, Kassia, Kouvouklisena, and Palaeologina. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rediscovering the Muses: Women's Musical Traditions.   Edited by Kimberly Marshall .   Northeastern University Press, 1993. Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 19., ( 1993):  Pages 111 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1993.

100. Record Number: 8718
Author(s): Stebbins, Charles E.
Contributor(s):
Title : La loenge des bonnes femmes dans la version en vers du XIVe siècle consacrée à la "Vie Saint Jehan-Baptiste" [While the anonymous author's stated intention in "La loenge des bonnes femmes" is to praise good women, he clearly demonstrates some ambivalence toward women. Though he praises the good qualities of Pleisele (Aelia Flaccilla), wife of Theodosius the Grea
Source: Revue des Langues Romanes , 96., 1 ( 1992):  Pages 147 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1992.

101. Record Number: 8868
Author(s): Taylor, Steven M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Martin Le Franc's Rehabilitation of Notorious Women: The Case of Pope Joan [The author argues that Martin Le Franc worked to counter misogynous writings by speaking in defense of women like Pope Joan who had been cast as figures of wickedness. Le Franc's method, using a debate format, was to 1) emphasize her good characteristics, 2) argue that men led her into trouble, and 3) point to men who had the same weakness, but to a much greater degree. The Appendix presents the medieval French text from the "Champion des Dames," Book IV, Octaves 490-507. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 19., ( 1992):  Pages 261 - 278.
Year of Publication: 1992.

102. Record Number: 10223
Author(s): Rushing, James A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Iwein as Slave of Woman: the “Maltererteppich” in Freiburg [The story of the Arthurian knight Iwein was known to medieval audiences not only through literary texts but also through pictorial representations, such as an early fourteenth-century tapestry in the Augustinermuseum in Freiburg. This wall-hanging features a series of medallions, two of which depict Iwein’s adventures. The other medallions feature examples of “Frauensklaven” or “Minnesklaven” (men humiliated by their submission to women), including some well-known figures like Samson and Delilah and Aristotle and Phyllis. Although the meaning of the tapestry is unclear, the images remove Iwein from his original function as an exemplary figure and insert him into a new context: a pictorial representation of the “Frauensklaven” topos. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 124 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1992.

103. Record Number: 10368
Author(s): Fenster, Thelma.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Christine Have a Sense of Humor? The Evidence of the "Epistre au dieu d’Amours" [One of the resources of feminine speech that Christine uses in her works is humor, which can be an instrument of moral critique. Christine uses the rhetorical strategies of humor, irony, and satire in her poetry to rebuke the misogyny of male authors, most powerfully in her attack of Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose.” Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1992.

104. Record Number: 10369
Author(s): McLeod, Glenda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetics and Antimisogynist Polemics in Christine de Pizan’s "Le Livre de la Cite des Dames" [The author explores the central role of morality and ethics in Christine’s work. The “Livre” is a work of generic and allegorical sophistication. In this text, Christine adapts some of the structures and rhetorical conventions of scholasticism in order to attack literary misogyny. The author compares the literary strategies used in Christine’s work to the allegorical procedures used by scholastic thinkers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 37 - 47.
Year of Publication: 1992.

105. Record Number: 10372
Author(s): Hicks, Eric.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Mirror for Misogynists: John of Salisbury’s “Policraticus” (8.11) in the Translation of Denis Foulechat (1372) [The author presents a translation and transcription of a misogynist text written in French by Foulechat, itself a translation of a Latin text by John of Salisbury. The writings of John of Salisbury influenced Christine’s politics, as her works often seek to address misogyny in the literary tradition. The author argues that it is plausible that Christine read Foulechat’s translation of John’s work. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 77 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1992.

106. Record Number: 10797
Author(s): Johnson, Susan M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christian Allusion and Divine Justice in "Yonec" [The article argues that Marie combines Christian and folk motifs to elevate women's mistreatment as an issue worthy of God's intervention. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: In Quest of Marie de France: A Twelfth-Century Poet.   Edited by Chantal A. Marechal .   Edwin Mellen Press, 1992. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 55., ( 1992):  Pages 161 - 174.
Year of Publication: 1992.

107. Record Number: 9455
Author(s): Calabrese, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : The “Double Sorwe” of the Wife of Bath: Chaucer and the Misogynist Tradition [Although the Wife of Bath can be read as a strong voice of defiance against male authority, she is ultimately an ambivalent figure. She expresses both anger and sorrow in response to conflicting and contradictory male attitudes toward marriage, female sexuality, and the worth of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 179 - 205.
Year of Publication: 1992.

108. Record Number: 10744
Author(s): Greilsammer, Myriam.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le Mariage en pays flamand: un "fait social total" [The author identifies three cruical themes for marriag in the Low Countries in the late Middle Ages: 1)The superiority of the male, 2)The centrality of the female, and 3) The fear that men had for the dangers that women posed. Greilsammer examines these themes in the areas of popular culture and Church doctrine. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Marriage and Social Mobility in the Late Middle Ages/Marriage et mobilité sociale au bas moyen-âge. Handelingen van het colloquieum gehouden te Gent op 18 april 1988.   Edited by W. Prevenier Studia Historica Gandensia .   Department of History of the Arts Faculty of the University of Gent, 1992. Florilegium , 11., ( 1992):  Pages 60 - 98. Second printing, revised and corrected by the editor
Year of Publication: 1992.

109. Record Number: 9487
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Gawain's antifeminist rant, the pentangle and narrative space [The author considers the way Gawain’s misogynist passage fits in with the rest of the Gawain-poet’s work, as well as with alliterative poetic projects more generally. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of English Studies , 22., ( 1992):  Pages 117 - 139.
Year of Publication: 1992.

110. Record Number: 8320
Author(s): Pfeffer, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Louange des femmes. "Oez seignor, je n'otroi pas" (Berne, Bibliothèque de la bourgeoisie nº 354) [The author discusses a late thirteenth-early fourteenth century dit, "Oez seignor, je n'otroi pas," which praises women. Pfeffer argues that the poet combines images from courtly literature with the popular genre of the dit which was recited on street corners. The full text of the dit is included in the article. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 93., ( 1992):  Pages 221 - 234.
Year of Publication: 1992.

111. Record Number: 9465
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Sin and Misogyny in John of Bromyard’s "Summa Predicantium" [The author examines misogyny in the “Summa Predicantium,” a popular compendium of exempla (stories offering moral lessons). In these stories, Bromyard’s female characters are more often figures of vice than virtue; however, the exempla are not inherently misogynist in this regard because the male characters are equally sinful. What makes Bromyard a misogynist is the root of these characters’ sins: Women commit sins because of their femininity; men commit them because they are human (not because they are male). Moreover, women are disproportionately depicted as lustful. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 47., ( 1992):  Pages 233 - 257.
Year of Publication: 1992.

112. Record Number: 10759
Author(s): Carruthers, Leo.
Contributor(s):
Title : No womman of no clerk is preysed: Attitudes to Women in Medieval English Religious Literature [The author briefly surveys Middle English sermon collections and penitential manuals. Title note supplied be Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Traditio , 47., ( 1992):  Pages 49 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1992.

113. Record Number: 10522
Author(s): Frugoni, Chiara.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Imagined Woman [The author provides an overview of visual representations of women in the medieval Christian West. Women were represented in a variety of art forms (including manuscripts, paintings, frescos, and sculptures). These images of women reflected perceived expectations of their roles (as virgins, wives, or widows) and reinforced Church doctrine on the sexual regulation of women, women’s roles within marriage, and women’s perceived duties within the domestic and religious spheres. The author argues that most of these representations are misogynistic; although women sometimes appear as saints (like the Virgin Mary) they often take the form of sinners and temptresses (like Eve). The author also examines how the visual arts use women as personifications of virtues and vices or other abstract concepts. In addition, the author argues that images provide insights into women’s private and daily lives, as well as the nature of women’s literacy and the variety of their occupations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Traditio , 47., ( 1992):  Pages 336 - 422.
Year of Publication: 1992.

114. Record Number: 10779
Author(s): Wimsatt, James I.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath, the Franklin, and the Rhetoric of St. Jerome [The author briefly explores the variety of viewpoints on virginity and marriage expressed by the Wife of Bath arguing against Jerome and the Franklin advocating a moderate response to Dorigen's solution of death or dishonor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Traditio , 47., ( 1992):  Pages 275 - 281.
Year of Publication: 1992.

115. Record Number: 9545
Author(s): Favier, Dale A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anelida and Arcite: Anti-Feminist Allegory, Pro-Feminist Complaint [The author argues that a pro-feminist impulse in Chaucer’s early poem “Anelida and Arcite” conflicts with the anti-feminist (misogynist) allegorical tradition upon which it borrows. In this tradition, poetry’s betrayal of literal meaning reflects men’s betrayal of women. Anelida’s complaint against Arcite (as well as the poet’s negative portrayal of Mars and Theseus) challenge this anti-feminist literary tradition. Chaucer’s interest in female-voiced complaint carries over into much of his later work. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chaucer Review , 26., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 83 - 94.
Year of Publication: 1991.

116. Record Number: 11199
Author(s): Hagen, Susan K.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath: Chaucer’s Inchoate Experiment in Feminist Hermeneutics [Although the Wife of Bath seems to represent the perspective of a real woman, she is in fact a fiction created by a male poet. Through the Wife of Bath, Chaucer tries to imagine how to represent a woman’s personal, secular experience when it does not coincide with what religious authorities claim a woman’s experience should be. In order to justify and relate her worldly experience, the Wife of Bath differentiates between religious and secular types of authority, interprets Scripture in her own way, and adopts a feminine, non-linear narrative style. In spite of these literary experiments, Chaucer ultimately fails to escape misogynist ways of thinking. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rebels and rivals: the contestive spirit in The Canterbury tales.   Edited by Susanna Greer Fein, David Raybin, and Peter C. Braeger Studies in medieval culture .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1991. Chaucer Review , 26., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 105 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1991.

117. Record Number: 13346
Author(s): Lhoest, Benoît
Contributor(s):
Title : Les dénominations de la femme en Moyen Français: approche lexicale et anthropologique [The author has built a corpus of 74 words referring to women in the late Middle Ages and Early Modern era. In analyzing the results, Lhoest finds that many of the terms refer to negative qualities characterizing women as ugly, stupid, weak, drunk, and wanton. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Zeitschrift für Romanische Philologie , 107., 3/4 ( 1991):  Pages 343 - 362.
Year of Publication: 1991.

118. Record Number: 11053
Author(s): Haddad, Gabriel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Richeut: A Translation [The author briefly discusses the old French text "Richeut," a poem concerning the prostitute named in the title and her son, Samson, a pimp, whom she outwits. Richeut is characterized as a greedy cheat who ruins every man she meets. The author's English translation follows his discussion. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Comitatus , 22., ( 1991):  Pages 1 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1991.

119. Record Number: 10886
Author(s): Charles, Casey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Adversus Jerome: Liberation Theology in the "Wife of Bath’s Prologue" [The Wife of Bath subverts ecclesiastical (clerical) modes of Biblical exegesis in the “sermon” that begins her "Prologue." She appropriates the method of scriptural interpretation used by writers like Saint Jerome, but she uses their interpretive strategies to support her own worldly and carnal ideas on marriage and sexuality. Her sermon is more than a parody of the authorities she imitates; she exposes the misogyny of clerical writers and also sanctifies the profane through her appropriation of exegetical techniques. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Assays: Critical Approaches to Medieval and Renaissance Texts , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1991.

120. Record Number: 11078
Author(s): Classen, Albrecht.
Contributor(s):
Title : Misogyny and the Battle of Genders in the Stricker's "Maeren" [The author argues that the Stricker’s "maeren" work against traditional male attitudes towards women, and that, in fact, the Stricker can be seen as a defender of Women's Rights. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neuphilologische Mitteilungen , 92., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 105 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1991.

121. Record Number: 11048
Author(s): Durling, Nancy Vine.
Contributor(s):
Title : “Mieux vaut jamais que tard”: Romance, Philology, and Old French Letters [The author discusses the shift in Old French philological studies away from the pleasure associated with romanticism and the feminine towards a rigid, exclusive privileging of “masculine,” scientific mastery. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Representations (Full Text via JSTOR) 36 (Autumn 1991): 64-86. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

122. Record Number: 12789
Author(s): Tougher, Shaun
Contributor(s):
Title : The Significance of Silence [The author argues that the Roman de Silence exposes a fear of women which is disguised as misogyny, and that this misogyny draws attention to the very anxiety Heldris de Cornualle attempts to conceal. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Paragraph , 13., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 202 - 216.
Year of Publication: 1990.

123. Record Number: 12792
Author(s): Armstrong, Guyda
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetry of Exclusion: A Feminist Reading of Some Troubadour Lyrics [The article questions the assumption that courtly love literature is “about women,” and attempts to expose the patriarchal structures within texts written by men. The author excludes the works of the trobairitz from this study. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Modern Language Review , 85., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 310 - 329.
Year of Publication: 1990.

124. Record Number: 12803
Author(s): Aird, William M
Contributor(s):
Title : Seduction and Suppression in 'Ami et Amile' [The author analyzes the trope of seduction in Ami et Amile in order to argue that women are introduced to the chanson de geste so that they can then be expelled; their exclusion ensures the integrity of the masculine collectivity. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: French Studies , 44., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 129 - 142.
Year of Publication: 1990.

125. Record Number: 11193
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and the Misogynistic Tradition [In her poetry, Christine de Pizan refutes the misogynist literary tradition exemplified by such texts as the Roman de la Rose. She confronts misogyny on three fronts: reason, experience, and writing. In her allegorical poems, Lady Reason encourages the author to reconsider common notions about women. The poet’s own experience allows her to give many counter examples to misogynist texts. Most importantly, Christine’s scholarly acts of reading and writing generate numerous examples of feminine virtue from books that previous writers have ignored. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Pages 297-311. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 279 - 292. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Translated by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski and Kevin Brownlee. W. W. Norton & Company, 1997. Pages 297-311.
Year of Publication: 1990.

126. Record Number: 12733
Author(s): Grieve, Patricia E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mothers and Daughters in Fifteenth-century Spanish Sentimental Romances: Implications for "Celestina" [Towards the end of the fifteenth century, it became less common for Spanish authors of sentimental romances to present favorable representations of active mother figures. Although it is not a sentimental romance, “Celestina” by Fernando de Rojas was influenced by the genre and can be seen as the culmination of this literary trend. In this text, the active mother figure is a bawd and the biological mother barely appears. These texts perpetuate the misogynist trope that depicts women who act upon sheer emotion or will as the agents of sexual violence; men, on the other hand, base their actions upon reason. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies , 67., 4 (October 1990):  Pages 345 - 355.
Year of Publication: 1990.

127. Record Number: 15596
Author(s): Berlioz, Jacques.
Contributor(s):
Title : Exempla: A Discussion and a Case Study [Exempla, illustrative moral stories often used by preachers, proved an important portrayal of gender as well as the details of every day life. Title not supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History.   Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal .   University of Georgia Press, 1990. Bulletin of Hispanic Studies , 67., 4 (October 1990):  Pages 37 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1990.

128. Record Number: 12693
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Flaws in the Golden Bowl: Gender and Spiritual Formation in the Twelfth Century [In twelfth century Western Europe, religious writers debated whether arrangements for men and for women in religious life were meant to be identical, equal, or separate. While works on religious formation and spiritual growth can present monastic values as gender neutral and some writings (like Abelard's letters to Heloise) purport to praise the virtues of women, misogyny is nonetheless pervasive in monastic writings (women are aligned with carnality, loquacity, and curiosity). Moreover, gender plays an important role in differentiating the importance of chastity for men and for women, and gender profoundly affects how communal life and spiritual growth are represented. The Appendix offers a list of religious literature of formation produced between 1075 and 1225. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 111 - 146. Republished in From Virile Woman to WomanChrist: Studies in Medieval Religion and Literature. By Barbara Newman. Middle Ages Series. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. Pages 19-45
Year of Publication: 1990.

129. Record Number: 12679
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Science and Discipline: The Ethos of Sex Education in a Fourteenth-Century Classroom [The author briefly surveys a commentary by William of Wheteley on a grammar school text. In lecturing on Aristotelian natural philosophy to his male students, aged seven to fourteen, William went into some detail on the male and female reproductive systems. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Homo Carnalis: The Carnal Aspect of Medieval Human Life.   Edited by Helen Rodite Lemay Acta .   Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton, 1990. Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 157 - 172. Papers presented at a conference held at the State University of New York at Stony Brook in 1987
Year of Publication: 1990.

130. Record Number: 15606
Author(s): Rosenthal, Joel T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anglo-Saxon Attitudes: Men's Sources, Women's History [The author discusses source material including law codes and the "Anglo Saxon Chronicle." Rosenthal suggests that women's history needs to be read obliquely in texts hwere they are not the focus but play roles of some importance like mothers in male saints' lives. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Women and the Sources of Medieval History.   Edited by Joel T. Rosenthal .   University of Georgia Press, 1990. Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 259 - 284.
Year of Publication: 1990.

131. Record Number: 11198
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Power of Women Topos on a Fourteenth-Century Embroidery
Source: Viator , 12., ( 1990):  Pages 203 - 234.
Year of Publication: 1990.

132. Record Number: 11213
Author(s): Crockett, Bryan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Venus Unveiled: Lydgate’s “Temple of Glas” and the Religion of Love [Although Lydgate’s allegorical poem strikes modern readers as long-winded and boring, it is actually an interesting ironic treatment of frustrated love that achieves its effect by reworking literary influences (especially Chaucer’s dream visions). While the poem appears to be a straightforward praise of Venus and erotic love, numerous Classical references and allusions to inconstant women run throughout the work. Thus, Lydgate actually believes that trusting in erotic love (and women in general) leads to disaster. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mediaevalia , 14., ( 1988):  Pages 201 - 230. 1991 (for 1988)
Year of Publication: 1988.

133. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Idolatry of Solomon
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/77/Hausbuchmeister_Salomos_G%C3%B6tzendienst.jpg/250px-Hausbuchmeister_Salomos_G%C3%B6tzendienst.jpg
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134. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Angry Wife
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/f/f8/Israel_van_Meckenem_-_Das_b%C3%B6se_Weib.jpg/250px-Israel_van_Meckenem_-_Das_b%C3%B6se_Weib.jpg
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135. Record Number:
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Contributor(s):
Title : Aristotle and Phyllis
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/68/Master_Of_The_Housebook_-_Aristotle_and_Phyllis_-_WGA14556.jpg/250px-Master_Of_The_Housebook_-_Aristotle_and_Phyllis_-_WGA14556.jpg
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136. Record Number:
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Henpecked Husband
Source:
Year of Publication: