Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


41 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 28343
Author(s): de Tournemire, Jean,
Contributor(s): Wallis, Faith, translator
Title : Metaphor and Malignancy: The Difficult Case of Cancer [Includes two primary source texts: Jean of Tournemire diagnoses his daughter’s breast cancer and receives divine medical aid and Guillaume Boucher treats a Parisian lady with breast cancer. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Medicine: A Reader.   Edited by Faith Wallis Readings in Medieval Civilizations and Cultures, 15.   University of Toronto Press, 2010.  Pages 344 - 351.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 15807
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Jean Gerson and the Debate on the "Romance of the Rose" [Jean Gerson and Christine de Pizan both attacked the Roman de la Rose. Christine rejected the poem's misogyny, while Gerson thought reading it would inspire people to sin. The defenders of the text rejected Christine as a woman and Gerson as ignorant of literature. Both Christine and Gerson made a direct, causal link between reading and human conduct. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: A Companion to Jean Gerson.   Edited by Brian Patrick McGuire Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition: A Series of handbooks and reference works on the intellectual and religious life of Europe, 500-1700 .   Brill, 2006.  Pages 317 - 356.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 19951
Author(s): Taylor, Craig
Contributor(s):
Title : The Salic Law, French Queenship, and the Defense of Women in the Late Middle Ages
Source: French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 543 - 564.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 10933
Author(s): Osborn, Marijane
Contributor(s):
Title : Authorship and Sexual/Allegorical Violence in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose" [The author argues that while Jean de Meun's "Rose" calls attention to authorship and authority, it supports the privileges of patriarchy and the subordination of women. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 628 - 659.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 8069
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Goddesses Empower Women? The Case of Dame Nature [The author argues that Christine de Pizan reinterprets the figure of Nature, making her a representation of all forms of female creativity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 135 - 155.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 9650
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Dangerous Embodiments: Froissart's Harton and Jean d'Arras's Melusine [The romance by Jean d'Arras concerns a fairy named Melusine who tries to hide her periodic assumption of a half-serpent and half-human form. Huot focuses on the sight of both Melusine and the supernatural Harton, which calls into question the identity of the self. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 78., 2 (April 2003):  Pages 400 - 420.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 10905
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Capetian Queens as the Foreground for an Aristocrats's Anxiety in the "Vie de Saint Louis" [The author argues that Joinville's text is really about his own qualities in comparison to the king's. His close relationship with the queen Margaret emphasizes the political side of the barons in their struggle with the monarchy. It also demonstrates Joinville's admirable qualities compared to the king's strange coldness toward his wife and children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. Speculum , 78., 2 (April 2003):  Pages 163 - 176.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 9509
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Mirror and the Rose: Marguerite Porete's Encounter with the "Dieu d' Amours" [The author argues that Marguerite Porete's mysticism embodies a "mystique courtoise" which drew on vernacular love poetry and romances, specifically the "Roman de la Rose," to express the relationship between the soul and a loving God. Title note supplie
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. Speculum , 78., 2 (April 2003):  Pages 105 - 123.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 6051
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Light as Glamor: The Luminescent Ideal of Beauty in the "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Speculum , 76., 4 (October 2001):  Pages 934 - 959.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 8959
Author(s): McGrady, Deborah
Contributor(s):
Title : Reinventing the "Roman de la Rose" for a Woman Reader: The Case of Ms. Douce 195 [The author argues that the illuminator Robinet Testard changed the traditional "Roman de la Rose" illustrations for a noble woman, Louise of Savoie. Some of the images question the misogyny in the text with one cycle showing outright disapproval of the jealous husband who beats his wife. Other illustrations show women as the surveyors of events rather than objects of the male gaze. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 202 - 227. Issue Title: Women and Book Culture in Late Medieval and Early Modern France
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 4764
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodily Peril: Sexuality and the Subversion of Order in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Modern Language Review , 95., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 41 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2000.

12. Record Number: 5532
Author(s): Heller, Sarah-Grace.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fashioning a Woman: The Vernacular Pygmalion in the "Roman de la Rose" ["As with conventions of rhetoric and erotic play, Jean de Meun's Pygmalion tale exploits conventional textile-acquiring and dressing fantasies, knowing that as conventions they appeal to readers. At the same time, he derides them, using hyperbole and the irony of the Pygmalion legend itself to expose the vain artifice that lurks behind the convention" Page 13].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 27., ( 2000):  Pages 1 - 18. Literacy and the Lay Reader
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 5587
Author(s): Rouse, Richard H. and Mary A. Rouse
Contributor(s):
Title : A "Rose" by Any Other Name: Richard and Jeanne de Montbaston as Illuminators of Vernacular Texts [Appendix 9A in Volume 2 presents a list of manuscripts including some for the king and nobility thought to be illustrated by Richard and Jeanne de Montbaston (fl. 1325- 1353); Appendix 9B Interpreting the "Gluures" in Manuscripts Illuminated by the Montbastons and Their Contemporaries explores possible meanings for the term "gluures" as recorded in various manuscripts counting initials or illuminations done with gold leaf].

14. Record Number: 4904
Author(s): Solterer, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fiction Versus Defamation: The Quarrel over the "Romance of the Rose"
Source: Medieval History Journal , 2., 1 (January-June 1999):  Pages 111 - 141.
Year of Publication: 1999.

15. Record Number: 4371
Author(s): Pratt, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Translating Misogamy: The Authority of the Intertext in the "Lamentationes Matheoluli" and Its Middle French Translation [The author highlights the role that Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose " plays in LeFevre's efforts to expand and enliven the antifeminist content].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 35., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 421 - 435.
Year of Publication: 1999.

16. Record Number: 4210
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath's "Prologue," LL. 328-336, and Boccaccio's "Decameron"
Source: Neophilologus , 83., 2 (April 1999):  Pages 313 - 316.
Year of Publication: 1999.

17. Record Number: 6289
Author(s): Berger, Günther.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Frau als Herrscherin und die "longue durée": Versionen der "Melusine" des Jean d'Arras vom Spätmittelalter bis zur Frühen Neuzeit
Source: Zeitschrift für romanische Philologie , 114., ( 1998):  Pages 199 - 209.
Year of Publication: 1998.

18. Record Number: 6405
Author(s): Gagliardi, Donatella.
Contributor(s):
Title : La "Historia de la linda Melosina": una o due versioni Castigliane del romano di Jean d'Arras? [the author considers two editions in Castilian Spanish of the "Melusine" of Jean d'Arras; the version published in Toulouse in 1489 is one of several translations of the "Melusine" published in the fifteenth century; this translation is similar to the versions circulating in France at the time but with deliberate modifications; the other translation (Seville, 1526) differs to a greater degree; the latter uses illustrations less suitable to the story, drawing on stock plates in the printer's shop].
Source: Medioevo Romanzo , 22., ( 1998):  Pages 116 - 141.
Year of Publication: 1998.

19. Record Number: 5344
Author(s): Porter, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rhetorical Phallacies: The Poetics of Misogyny in Jean de Meun's Discourse of Nature
Source: Mediaevalia , 22., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 59 - 77. Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1998.

20. Record Number: 3361
Author(s): Corfis, Ivy A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Empire and Romance: "Historia de la linda Melosina"
Source: Neophilologus , 82., 4 (October 1998):  Pages 559 - 575.
Year of Publication: 1998.

21. Record Number: 2478
Author(s): Sullivan, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Inquisitorial Origins of Literary Debate [argues that Christine and her opponents, Gontier and Pierre Col and Jean de Montreuil, in the "Querrelle de la Rose" all used inquisitorial rhetoric and branded the opposite side as heretics in need of salvation].
Source: Romanic Review , 88., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 27 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1997.

22. Record Number: 3912
Author(s): Ward, Jennifer C.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Birth of Venus in the Roman de la Rose [the Appendix reproduces texts dealing with the birth of Venus from Isidore of Seville, Fulgentius, Vatican Mythographers, John the Scot, Remigius of Auxerre, Bernardus Silvestris, and Ovide Moralisé; the texts are in both the original language (mostly Latin) and English translation].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 9., 1 (Spring 1997):  Pages 7 - 37.
Year of Publication: 1997.

23. Record Number: 1205
Author(s): Suranyi, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Fifteenth-Century Woman's Pathway to Fame: The "Querelle de la Rose" and the Literary Career of Christine de Pizan
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 23., ( 1997):  Pages 204 - 221.
Year of Publication: 1997.

24. Record Number: 3640
Author(s): Richards, Earl Jeffrey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rejecting Essentialism and Gendered Writing: The Case of Christine de Pizan [Christine de Pizan challenges the misogyny inherent in medieval literary culture].
Source: Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages.   Edited by Jane Chance .   University Press of Florida, 1996. Fifteenth Century Studies , 23., ( 1997):  Pages 96 - 131.
Year of Publication: 1996.

25. Record Number: 1366
Author(s): Pasteur, Claude.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jean d'Aulon, écuyer de Jeanne d'Arc, ne pourra la sauver [article does not include footnotes or bibliography of sources consulted].
Source: Historia , 579., (mars 1995):  Pages 80 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 440
Author(s): Solterer, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Flaming Words: Verbal Violence and Gender in Premodern Paris [Christine de Pizan's invectives].
Source: Romanic Review , 86., 2 (March 1995):  Pages 355 - 378. Special issue: The Production of Knowledge: Institutionalizing Sex, Gender, and Sexualiity in Medieval Discourse. Ed. by Kathryn Gravdal.
Year of Publication: 1995.

27. Record Number: 2448
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reflections on St. Luke's Hand: Icons and the Nature of Aura in the Burgundian Low Countries During the Fifteenth Century [argues that the fifteen copies of Cambrai's "Virgin and Child" icon were commissioned as part of a fund raising effort for the liberation of Constantinople from the Ottomans].
Source: The Sacred Image East and West.   Edited by Robert Ousterhout and Leslie Brubaker .   Illinois Byzantine Studies IV. University of Illinois Press, 1995. Romanic Review , 86., 2 (March 1995):  Pages 132 - 146.
Year of Publication: 1995.

28. Record Number: 238
Author(s): Harf-Lancner, Laurence.
Contributor(s):
Title : Serpente et le sanglier. Les manuscrits enluminés des deux romans français de "Mélusine"
Source: Moyen Age , 101., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 65 - 87.
Year of Publication: 1995.

29. Record Number: 374
Author(s): Arden, Heather.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women as Readers, Women as Text in the "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Moyen Age , 101., 1 ( 1995):  Pages 111 - 117.
Year of Publication: 1995.

30. Record Number: 1771
Author(s): Brook, Leslie C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jalousie and Jealousy in Jean de Meun's "Rose"
Source: Romance Quarterly , 41., 2 (Spring 1994):  Pages 59 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1994.

31. Record Number: 8482
Author(s): Kay, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Body of Knowledge: Epistemology and Misogyny in the "Romance of the Rose" [The author situates Jean de Meun's epistemology and misogyny within the intellectual currents and direct literary sources of the "Roman de la Rose," including Boethius, Alan de Lille, and the neo-Aristotelians. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Romance Quarterly , 41., 2 (Spring 1994):  Pages 211 - 235.
Year of Publication: 1994.

32. Record Number: 1764
Author(s): Brownlee, Kevin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mélusine's Hybrid Body and the Poetics of Metamorphosis [discussion of multiple aspects including the monstrous, the erotic, the courtly, the maternal, and the political].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 86 (1994): 18-38. Corps Mystique, Corps Sacré: Textual Transfigurations of the Body from the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

33. Record Number: 9547
Author(s): Lewis, Suzanne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Images of Opening, Penetration, and Closure in the "Roman de la Rose" [Illuminations in the "Roman de la Rose" frequently interpret the text. Many of the images, particularly that of Narcissus, deal with self-love and romantic illusions. When the lover's plucking of the Rose is illustrated, the artists frequently depict the rape of an entirely passive woman. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Word and Image , 8., 3 (July-September 1992):  Pages 215 - 242.
Year of Publication: 1992.

34. Record Number: 10368
Author(s): Fenster, Thelma.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Christine Have a Sense of Humor? The Evidence of the "Epistre au dieu d’Amours" [One of the resources of feminine speech that Christine uses in her works is humor, which can be an instrument of moral critique. Christine uses the rhetorical strategies of humor, irony, and satire in her poetry to rebuke the misogyny of male authors, most powerfully in her attack of Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose.” Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Word and Image , 8., 3 (July-September 1992):  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1992.

35. Record Number: 10373
Author(s): Margolis, Nadia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Elegant Closures: The Use of the Diminutive in Christine de Pizan and Jean de Meun [Christine wasn’t overcome by any anxiety of influence in regard to her poetic predecessor Jean de Meun; instead, she was independent in her use of rhetoric. Her use of diminutives, in particular, is a powerful tool for expressing her feminist concerns. While male authors tend to use the diminutive form of words in order to condescend, Christine uses these word forms in more subtle and varied ways. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Word and Image , 8., 3 (July-September 1992):  Pages 111 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1992.

36. Record Number: 10381
Author(s): Richards, Earl Jeffrey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan, the Conventions of Courtly Diction, and Italian Humanism [Christine dramatically transformed French poetic conventions through the influence of Italian humanist literary culture. The author argues that Christine prefers the models of eloquence offered by Italian poets like Dante and Petrarch over those offered by the French tradition (including the “Roman de la Rose” and Guillaume Machaut’s poetry). Christine’s writings offer a revolutionary political vision, espousing a unifying ideology of French nationalism over class division. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Word and Image , 8., 3 (July-September 1992):  Pages 250 - 271.
Year of Publication: 1992.

37. Record Number: 10382
Author(s): Stablein-Harris, Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Orleans, the Epic Tradition, and the Sacred Texts of Christine de Pizan [Christine’s experience with politics at the French court motivated her to portray the immorality of her life and times through epic texts. In her “Dit de la Rose,” she rewrites Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose” but she uses key words for her own purposes. The religious sentiment and moral tone in Christine’s “Dit” directly respond to the blasphemous and secular uses of language in Jean’s original poem. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Word and Image , 8., 3 (July-September 1992):  Pages 272 - 284.
Year of Publication: 1992.

38. Record Number: 10772
Author(s): Housington, Brenda M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mélusines de France et d'Outremanche: Portraits of Women in Jean d'Arras, Coudrette, and Their Middle English Translators
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992.  Pages 199 - 208.
Year of Publication: 1992.

39. Record Number: 10974
Author(s): Brook, Leslie C.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Translator and His Reader: Jean de Meun and the Abelard-Heloise Correspondence [The author discusses Jean de Meun's role as a translator of Latin texts into French prose, focusing in particular on the translation strategies he used in approaching the Abelard-Heloise Correspondence. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Translator , 2., ( 1991):  Pages 99 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1991.

40. Record Number: 11193
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pizan and the Misogynistic Tradition [In her poetry, Christine de Pizan refutes the misogynist literary tradition exemplified by such texts as the Roman de la Rose. She confronts misogyny on three fronts: reason, experience, and writing. In her allegorical poems, Lady Reason encourages the author to reconsider common notions about women. The poet’s own experience allows her to give many counter examples to misogynist texts. Most importantly, Christine’s scholarly acts of reading and writing generate numerous examples of feminine virtue from books that previous writers have ignored. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Pages 297-311. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 279 - 292. Reprinted in The Selected Writings of Christine de Pizan: New Translations, Criticism. Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski. Translated by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski and Kevin Brownlee. W. W. Norton & Company, 1997. Pages 297-311.
Year of Publication: 1990.

41. Record Number: 28572
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Heloise and Abelard
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/5/55/Abelard_and_Heloise.jpeg/250px-Abelard_and_Heloise.jpeg
Year of Publication: