Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


7 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 42630
Author(s): Margaret of Anjou, Wife of Henry VI, King of England
Contributor(s): Cron, B. M., ed. and Maurer, Helen, ed.
Title : The Letters of Margaret of Anjou
Source: The Letters of Margaret of Anjou.   Edited by Helen Maurer and B. M. Cron .   Boydell Press, 2019.  Pages 1 - 303.
Year of Publication: 2019.

2. Record Number: 32273
Author(s): Maurer, Helen E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Un pouvoir à négocier: le cas de Marguerite d' Anjou
Source: Femmes de pouvoir, femmes politiques durant les derniers siècles du Moyen Âge et au cours de la première Renaissance.   Edited by Eric Bousmar, Jonathan Dumont, Alain Marchandisse and Bertrand Schnerb .   De Boeck, 2012.  Pages 113 - 127.
Year of Publication: 2012.

3. Record Number: 27643
Author(s): Stone, John,
Contributor(s):
Title : Margaret, Queen of England [In this entry for 1446, John Stone, monk of the Cathedral Priory of Christ Church, Canterbury, records that Margaret, wife of King Henry VI, arrived in Canterbury for a stay of several days. She heard mass at the altar of the Virgin Mary, at the shrine of St Thomas, and high mass in the cathedral. See other brief entries about Queen Margaret on pages 78, 82, and 96. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: John Stone’s Chronicle: Christ Church Priory, Canterbury, 1417-1472.   Edited by Meriel Connor TEAMS Documents of Practice Series .   Medieval Institute Publications, 2010.  Pages 80 - 80.
Year of Publication: 2010.

4. Record Number: 28316
Author(s): Stone, John,
Contributor(s): Connor, Meriel, translator
Title : Margaret, Queen of England [In this entry for 1446, John Stone, monk of the Cathedral Priory of Christ Church, Canterbury, records that Margaret, wife of King Henry VI, arrived in Canterbury for a stay of several days. She heard mass at the altar of the Virgin Mary, at the shrine of St Thomas, and high mass in the cathedral. See other brief entries about Queen Margaret on pages 78, 82, and 96. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: John Stone’s Chronicle: Christ Church Priory, Canterbury, 1417-1472.   Edited by Meriel Connor TEAMS Documents of Practice Series .   Medieval Institute Publications, 2010.  Pages 80 - 80.
Year of Publication: 2010.

5. Record Number: 8572
Author(s): Laynesmith, J. L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Constructing Queenship at Coventry: Pagentry and Politics at Margaret of Anjou's 'Secret Harbor' [Coventry, one of the largest cities in England, was particularly loyal to Margaret of Anjou. In 1456 she was welcomed there with great pageantry. In these presentations, the queen was compared to the Virgin Mary as the mother of a royal son and to Saint Margaret as a dragon slayer. These ceremonies underlined her power, not that of her feeble husband, but Margaret did not arrogate the king's royal symbols to herself. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fifteenth Century , 3., ( 2003):  Pages 137 - 147. Thematic issue: Authority and Subversion
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 5966
Author(s): Dunn, Diana.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margaret of Anjou, the Warlike Queen: The Making of a Reputation
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Fifteenth Century , 3., ( 2003):
Year of Publication: 2001.

7. Record Number: 1304
Author(s): Cron, B. M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Duke of Suffolk, the Angevin Marriage, and the Ceding of Maine, 1445 [argues that the negotiations for Margaret's marriage did not involve a secret promise by Suffolk to surrender Maine to either René of Anjou or Charles VII of France].
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 20., 1 (March 1994):  Pages 77 - 99.
Year of Publication: 1994.