Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


17 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 27613
Author(s): Gaudette, Helen A.,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Spending Power of a Crusader Queen: Melisende of Jerusalem [The author analyzes three projects which Melisende supported in part to increase public support for her rule: Bethgibelin Castle, the women's monastery of Bethany, and the covered market street in Jerusalem called "Malquisinat" (literally the Street of Bad Cooking). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women and Wealth in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Theresa Earenfight The New Middle Ages. .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2010.  Pages 135 - 148.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 10903
Author(s): Schowalter, Kathleen S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Ingeborg Psalter: Queenship, Legitimacy, and the Appropriation of Byzantine Art in the West [Ingeberg of Denmark married Philippe Auguste, but he repudiated her the following day. She insisted on her legitimacy for twenty years before being restored. Schowalter argues that her psalter models itself on the one belonging to Queen Melisande and that changes in the iconography were made deliberately to emphasize Ingeborg's queenship including representations of anointing and coronation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.  Pages 99 - 135.
Year of Publication: 2003.

3. Record Number: 9721
Author(s): Craig, Leigh Ann
Contributor(s):
Title : Stronger Than Men and Braver Than Knights: Women and the Pilgrimages to Jerusalem and Rome in the Later Middle Ages
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 29., 3 (September 2003):  Pages 153 - 175.
Year of Publication: 2003.

4. Record Number: 8838
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Alice of Antioch: A Case Study of Female Power in the Twelfth Century [The author analyzes Alice's efforts to gain power in Antioch following the death of her husband, Bohemond II. Her young daughter Constance was the next in line, but Alice set up an independent lordship in exile and again attempted to seize power in Antioch in 1135. Her efforts were not successful, but the author argues that scholars should give her life fair consideration rather than be influenced by William of Tyre's negative portrayal of her. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Experience of Crusading. Volume Two: Defining the Crusader Kingdom.   Edited by Peter Edbury and Jonathan Phillips .   Cambridge University Press, 2003. Journal of Medieval History , 29., 3 (September 2003):  Pages 29 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2003.

5. Record Number: 8089
Author(s): Price, Merrall Llewelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Imperial Violence and the Monstrous Mother: Cannibalism at the Siege of Jerusalem [The author explores the popular tale of Maria of Jerusalem who ate her own infant during a siege of Jerusalem. The author is interested in her as both a double and opposite of the Virgin Mary whose son was also sacrificed. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. Journal of Medieval History , 29., 3 (September 2003):  Pages 272 - 298.
Year of Publication: 2002.

6. Record Number: 6742
Author(s): Schein, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in Medieval Colonial Society: The Latin Kingdom of Jerusalem in the Twelfth Century [The author argues that noble and royal women in the Crusader Kingdom had a better legal status and more freedom of action than women in Europe because the conditions of constant war often overruled traditional gender roles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Crusades.   Edited by Susan B. Edgington and Sarah Lambert .   University of Wales Press, 2001. Journal of Medieval History , 29., 3 (September 2003):  Pages 140 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2001.

7. Record Number: 4236
Author(s): Nicholson, H. J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margaret de Lacy and the Hospital of St. John at Aconbury, Herefordshire [The author examines Magaret de Lacy's successful effort to oust the Hospitallers from the priory that she had founded for women].
Source:   Edited by Anthony Luttrell and Helen J. Nicholson Journal of Ecclesiastical History , 50., 4 (October 1999):  Pages 629 - 651. Later version published in Hospitaller Women in the Middle Ages. Edited by Anthony Luttrell and Helen J. Nicholson. Ashgate, 2006. Pages 153-178
Year of Publication: 1999.

8. Record Number: 4395
Author(s): Schein, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bridget of Sweden, Margery Kempe, and Women's Jerusalem Pilgrimages in the Middle Ages [The author argues that there were unique motivations for women's pilgrimage to Jerusalem; because of their devotion to the humanity of Christ, they wanted to relive his sufferings in the places where it had happened.]
Source: Mediterranean Historical Review , 14., 1 (June 1999):  Pages 44 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1999.

9. Record Number: 5555
Author(s): Schein, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Female-Men of God" and "Men Who Were Women." Female Saints and Holy Land Pilgrimage During the Byzantine Period [The author considers the Roman aristocratic women who made pilgrimages to Jerusalem and, when pilgrimage for women was discouraged, the stories of transvestite female saints who also came to Jerusalem; in both groups an ascetic way of life allowed them to transcend their sinfulness and make a sincere conversion; the appendices present a list of women pilgrims to Jerusalem and a shorter list of transvestite female pilgrims].
Source: Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 5., ( 1998):  Pages 1 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1998.

10. Record Number: 5680
Author(s): Thomas, Anabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : A New Date for Neri di Bicci's S. Giovannino dei Cavalieri "Coronation of the Virgin" [the author presents document transcriptions in the article's Appendix that prove that Neri di Bicci was selected by the nuns of S. Niccolò dei Frieri to paint an altarpiece in 1488; further document extracts indicate the nuns' additional efforts to make the high altar more splendid].
Source: Burlington Magazine (Full Text via JSTOR) 139, 1127 (February 1997): 103-106. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

11. Record Number: 2891
Author(s): DeAragon, RaGena C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queen or Consort: Rulership and Politics in the Latin East, 1118-1228 [explores the dynastic history of the kingdom of Jerusalem which had four reigning queens, Melisende, Sibylla, Isabella, and Maria of Montferrat].
Source: Queens and Queenship in Medieval Europe: Proceedings of a Conference Held at King's College London, April 1995.   Edited by Anne J. Duggan .   Boydell Press, 1997. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 5., ( 1998):  Pages 153 - 169.
Year of Publication: 1997.

12. Record Number: 5334
Author(s): Folda, Jaroslav
Contributor(s):
Title : A Twelfth-Century Prayerbook for the Queen of Jerusalem [the author argues that the manuscript was commissioned by King Fulk for his wife, Queen Melisende, as part of his efforts to moderate her anger following his ill treatment of Hugh, Count of Jaffa; the manuscript illuminations, ivory bookcovers, and silk covering combine decorative motifs from Melisende's Orthodox-Crusader Eastern heritage with Fulk's Anglo-Angevin inheritance].
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 8., ( 1993):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1993.

13. Record Number: 11211
Author(s): Dronke, Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Symbolic Cities of Hildegard of Bingen [Hildegard’s image of the Heavenly City of Jerusalem employs complex symbolism, combining imagery of the city as a flowering garden, as a cosmic tree, and as a place built of precious stones. Hildegard fuses this bud, stone, and tree imagery from Biblical and literary sources, especially the "Apocalypse of John," a Christian allegory by the second-century author Hermas, and “The City of God” by Saint Augustine. Similar metaphors drawn from nature (including images of the cosmos as an egg) run through Hildegard’s other major works. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval Latin , 1., ( 1991):  Pages 168 - 183.
Year of Publication: 1991.

14. Record Number: 6388
Author(s): Troubat, Olivier.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maria di Borbone imperatrice di Costantinopoli [Louis I of Bourbon advanced his ambitions in the eastern Mediterranean by marrying his daughter Marie to Guy de Lusignan of Cyprus; after she was widowed, her brother Pierre married her to Robert, prince of Taranto; after being widowed a second time she ruled Morea-Achaia; she then retired to Naples where she was active in politics until her death in 1387; her nephew Louis II of Bourbon became her heir, maintaining a political role in the eastern Mediterranean until his death in 1410].
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 148., 546 ( 1990):  Pages 739 - 765.
Year of Publication: 1990.

15. Record Number: 28725
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Coronation of the Virgin
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 148., 546 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

16. Record Number: 31894
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Roman Siege of Jerusalem with Infanticide and Isabel de Byron between the Arms of Neville of Hornby and those of Byron
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 148., 546 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

17. Record Number: 31992
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Coronation of Baldwin III of Jerusalem by his mother, Melisende of Jerusalem
Source: Archivio Storico Italiano , 148., 546 ( 1990):
Year of Publication: