Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


207 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 31719
Author(s): Matlock, Wendy A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Feminine Flesh in the Disputacione betwyx the Body and Wormes
Source: The Ends of the Body: Identity and Community in Medieval Culture.   Edited by Suzanne Conklin Akbari and Jill Ross .   University of Toronto Press, 2013.  Pages 260 - 282.
Year of Publication: 2013.

2. Record Number: 20338
Author(s): Bartolomei Romangoli, Alessandra
Contributor(s):
Title : Il linguaggio del corpo in Santa Caterina da Siena [Raymond of Capua described Catherine of Siena's body as transformed from a natural entity to one expressing Christ's own body. This was achieved by extreme mortification of the flesh, especially by giving up food. Catherine used bodily metaphors in her w
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 205 - 229.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 16302
Author(s): Eichhorn-Mulligan, Amy C.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anatomy of Power and the Miracle of Kingship: The Female Body of Sovereignty in a Medieval Irish Kingship Tale
Source: Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 1014 - 1054.
Year of Publication: 2006.

4. Record Number: 11756
Author(s): Raguin, Virginia Chieffo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Real and Imagined Bodies in Architectural Space: The Setting for Margery Kempe's "Book" [The author argues that Margery Kempe constructs an image of herself in her text based on experiences in religious spaces. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 105 - 140.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 20700
Author(s): Nichols, Stephen G
Contributor(s):
Title : Writing the New Middle Ages [Contemporary medieval studies attempts to escape the traps of regarding the Middle Ages as either entirely "other" or simply "modern." Nichols reviews the contributions of five recent authors: Jody Enders, Suzannah Biernoff, Jeffrey Hamburger, R. Howard Bloch, and Daniel Heller-Roazen. All have made advances by refusing to adhere to the fixed boundaries drawn by previous scholarship. Of particular interest are works by Hamburger, discussing the agency nuns attained even when cloistered, and Bloch, describing the role of Marie de France in creating vernacular literature. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America , 120., 2 ( 2005):  Pages 422 - 441.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 19230
Author(s): Moulinier, Laurence
Contributor(s):
Title : Conception et corps féminin selon Hildegarde de Bingen [The author explores Hildegard of Bingen's ideas about women's reproductive systems in her medical treatise, "Causae et curae." Topics treated in the article include female semen, conception, sexuality, reproduction, menstruation, and aging. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Storia delle donne 1 (2005): 139-157.
Year of Publication: 2005.

7. Record Number: 13679
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Representation, Imitation, Rejection: Chiara of Montefalco (d. 1308) and the Passion of Christ [The author briefly explores the visual references, especially for the passion of Christ, that were commonly known. These references helped shape people's understanding of holy women. When Clare of Montefalco died her fellow nuns expected to find evidence of her devotion to Christ in her heart. When it was cut open they found a cross and instruments of the passion. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies on Medieval and Early Modern Women 4: Victims or Viragos?   Edited by Christine Meek and Catherine Lawless .   Four Courts Press, 2005.  Pages 89 - 101.
Year of Publication: 2005.

8. Record Number: 11754
Author(s): Blanton, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ely's St. Æthelthryth: The Shrine's Enclosure of the Female Body as Symbol for the Inviolability of Monastic Space [The author argues that the monks at Ely used hagiographies and historical accounts to present the saint and her monastery in as strong a position as possible. The monks identify with the holy female body, emphasizing that as Æthelthryth's body is intact so the lands and properties of the monastery must not be violently seized. After the Norman conquest, William sent Norman monks to Ely. They, however, also wanted to defend the house's privileges, and the writings took on a new image for the saint. She is a warrior woman (a virago or virile woman) who confronts those wrongly holding the monastery's properties. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005.  Pages 47 - 73.
Year of Publication: 2005.

9. Record Number: 14689
Author(s): Bildhauer, Bettina.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Secrets of Women" (c. 1300): A Medieval Perspective on Menstruation [The author analyzes a fifteenth century German language translations of the natural philosophical text, the "Secrets of Women." It presents a system in which gender is defined by the body with men as the norm and women as dangerous, impure, and weak. Title note provided by Feminae.].
Source: Menstruation: A Cultural History.   Edited by Andrew Shail and Gillian Howie .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2005.  Pages 65 - 75.
Year of Publication: 2005.

10. Record Number: 11016
Author(s): Christie, Edward.
Contributor(s):
Title : Self-Mastery and Submission: Holiness and Masculinity in the Lives of Anglo-Saxon Martyr Kings [The author analyzes Old English lives of Edmund and Oswald, finding that the kings achieve an heroic masculinity through an acceptance of suffering. Although these kings win lasting fame, which was also the goal of Anglo-Saxon warrior heroes, they do it through sacrifice of self. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Holiness and Masculinity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by P. H. Cullum and Katherine J. Lewis .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages Series. University of Wales Press, 2004. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 143 - 157.
Year of Publication: 2004.

11. Record Number: 11751
Author(s): Denny-Brown, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rips and Slits: The Torn Garment and the Medieval Self [A fashion for garments with slits, tears, or perforations originated in the 12th century and flourished after 1340. Some slits were intended to reveal undergarments or flesh, exposing them to the gaze of others. This erotic element inspired sumptuary laws and denunciations. Medieval literature also reveals a close relationship between the terms for these slits and violence, as in dagging and daggers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Clothing Culture, 1350-1650.   Edited by Catherine Richardson .   Ashgate, 2004. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 223 - 237.
Year of Publication: 2004.

12. Record Number: 11023
Author(s): Crachiolo, Beth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing the Gendering of Violence: Female and Male Martyrs in the "South English Legendary" [The author argues that while male martyrs have a variety of roles to play in the church, women martyrs simply react to those around them, ranging from cruel suitors to unfeeling torturers. Crachiolo suggests that the audience saw the female body as an object of entertainment though the hagiographer intended the descriptions of torture as a denial of the material world in the favor of Christian spirituality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Great Effusion of Blood? Interpreting Medieval Violence.   Edited by Mark D. Meyerson, Daniel Thiery, and Oren Falk .   University of Toronto Press, 2004.  Pages 147 - 163.
Year of Publication: 2004.

13. Record Number: 10883
Author(s): Ziegler, Joanna E.
Contributor(s):
Title : On the Artistic Nature of Elisabeth of Spalbeek's Ecstasy: The Southern Low Countries Do Matter [The author argues that Elisabeth von Spalbeek should be considered an artist and that her reenactments of the passion can best be understood in visual terms as akin to theatrical performances. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Texture of Society: Medieval Women in the Southern Low Countries.   Edited by Ellen E. Kittell and Mary A. Suydam .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.  Pages 181 - 202.
Year of Publication: 2004.

14. Record Number: 11025
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Violence, the Queen's Body, and the Medieval Body Politic [The author explores historical and literary accounts of queens and noble women appearing before their husbands in their shifts to refute false accusations. Wearing a shift was next to nudity; moreover the woman had discarded the dress provided by her husband as a mark of social status. Frequently this was intended as an act of resistance to salvage a troubled marriage. These stories reflect concerns about the consort as a potential locus of resistance, instead of a support for the regime, even when reclaiming her rightful status. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Great Effusion of Blood? Interpreting Medieval Violence.   Edited by Mark D. Meyerson, Daniel Thiery, and Oren Falk .   University of Toronto Press, 2004.  Pages 241 - 267.
Year of Publication: 2004.

15. Record Number: 12611
Author(s): Denny-Brown, Andrea.
Contributor(s):
Title : How Philosophy Matters: Death, Sex, Clothes, and Boethius [Lady Philosophy’s garment has an important symbolic significance, yet Boethius still depicts it as a material object. The materiality of Philosophy’s garment unsettles her supposed status as a purely immaterial abstraction. The corporeal status of her sexually-violated body and the gaps in her garment align her with the Muses of Poetry, negating a perception of Philosophy as pure, perfect, or whole. Her imperfect garment and female body thus symbolize human loss, corruption and mortality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 177 - 191.
Year of Publication: 2004.

16. Record Number: 12612
Author(s): Kay, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Flayed Skin as "objet a": Representation and Materiality in Guillaume de Deguileville’s "Pelerinage de vie humaine" [Allusions to flaying and stripping human flesh abound in Guillaume’s didactic allegory, which features female personifications embodying various abstractions. In the case of the Deadly Sins, flaying skin is linked to bodily punishment; in the case of Virtues, flayed skin alludes to Scripture and written documents (manuscripts being written on parchment, or flayed animal skin). Although Guillaume’s flaying theme presents skin as in some ways pointing towards a sublime immortality, the materiality of skin also represents the mortality of the body. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004.  Pages 193 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2004.

17. Record Number: 10853
Author(s): Keen, Catherine M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the Medieval City: Viewing the Body Politic from Exile in Early Italian Verse [Keen examines poems by four authors in exile (Dante, Cino da Pistoia, Pietro dei Faitinelli, and Niccolò del Rosso) in which the natal city is depicted as a beautiful woman; sometimes she is to be pitied, but other times she is hateful. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.  Pages 155 - 171.
Year of Publication: 2004.

18. Record Number: 14754
Author(s): Blanton, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : King Anna's Daughters: Genealogical Narrative and Cult Formation in the "Liber Eliensis" [The "Liber Eliensis" written by twelfth century monks at Ely, created Wihtburg as another sister for Aethelthryth to underline her sanctity and importance by emphasizing virginity, royalty and holy kinship. These stories went beyond the monastery to local communities in East Anglia and appear in saints' lives and parish records as late as the fifteenth and early sixteenth centuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 127 - 149.
Year of Publication: 2004.

19. Record Number: 12605
Author(s): Burns, Jane E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Textiles Make a Difference [Dress, textiles, and cloth production are emerging as important categories of analysis in medieval studies. While investigating textiles and representations thereof (in literary, historical, legal, and religious texts), medievalists cross disciplinary boundaries in order to examine how the personal and cultural realms interact. Social theorists, feminists, and scholars of material culture can all contribute to our understandings of how goods and objects take upon new meanings for men and women in different social contexts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Fabrications: Dress, Textiles, Clothwork, and Other Cultural Imaginings.   Edited by E. Jane Burns .   Palgrave, 2004. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 1 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2004.

20. Record Number: 11955
Author(s): Parsons, John Carmi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Damned If She Didn't and Damned When She Did: Bodies, Babies, and Bastards in the Lives of Two Queens of France
Source: Eleanor of Aquitaine: Lord and Lady.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and John Carmi Parsons The New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003.  Pages 265 - 299.
Year of Publication: 2003.

21. Record Number: 11652
Author(s): Arnold, John H.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Labour of Continence: Masculinity and Clerical Virginity [The author looks at three narratives concerned in part with clerical chastity: "Jewel of the Church" by Gerald of Wales, Jacob of Voragine's "Golden Legend," and Caesarius of Heisterbach's "Dialogue on Miracles." Arnold identifies four different tropes in overcoming sexual temptations including divine intervention to remove the male saint's desire. In most cases though male chastity required vigilance and willpower because masculinity itself was flawed in its inclination toward temptation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Virginities.   Edited by Anke Bernau, Ruth Evans, and Sarah Salih .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages series. University of Wales Press; University of Toronto Press, 2003. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 102 - 118.
Year of Publication: 2003.

22. Record Number: 11657
Author(s): Müller, Matthias
Contributor(s):
Title : Saint, Witch, Man, Maid, or Whore?: Joan of Arc and Writing History [The author analyses English historians' accounts from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries about Joan of Arc's virginity. Bernau argues that their preoccupation signals larger concerns, not just about religious and political debates, but about the rhetoric of truth and representation in history. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Virginities.   Edited by Anke Bernau, Ruth Evans, and Sarah Salih .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages series. University of Wales Press; University of Toronto Press, 2003. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 30., 1 (Spring 2004):  Pages 214 - 233.
Year of Publication: 2003.

23. Record Number: 14255
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Ingesting Bodily Filth: Defilement in the Spirituality of Angela of Foligno [The author argues that Angela of Foligno ate scabs from lepers joyfully as a sacred act likened to the Eucharist. Morrison compares the similar experiences of Catherine of Siena, Francis of Assisi, and Catherine of Genoa but finds differing motives inclu
Source: Romance Quarterly , 50., 3 (Summer 2003):  Pages 204 - 216.
Year of Publication: 2003.

24. Record Number: 9650
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Dangerous Embodiments: Froissart's Harton and Jean d'Arras's Melusine [The romance by Jean d'Arras concerns a fairy named Melusine who tries to hide her periodic assumption of a half-serpent and half-human form. Huot focuses on the sight of both Melusine and the supernatural Harton, which calls into question the identity of the self. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 78., 2 (April 2003):  Pages 400 - 420.
Year of Publication: 2003.

25. Record Number: 9473
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Mystical Bodies: Reflections on Amy Hollywood's "Sensible Ecstasy" [The author of this review essay praises Hollywood's book about French theoretical responses to sexual difference and mysticism. Hollywood analyzes the work of Bataille, Beauvoir, Irigaray, and Lacan. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Religion (Full Text via JSTOR) 83, 4 (October 2003): 593-598. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

26. Record Number: 11651
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Four Virgins' Tales: Sex and Power in Medieval Law [The author examines four law cases in which virginity is at issue: a charge of rape, a payment for defloration, a fine for a peasant girl having sex, and a grant of property by a single woman "in my free power and virginity." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Virginities.   Edited by Anke Bernau, Ruth Evans, and Sarah Salih .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages series. University of Wales Press; University of Toronto Press, 2003.  Pages 80 - 101.
Year of Publication: 2003.

27. Record Number: 11091
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Savoring "Scienta": The Medieval Anchoress Reads "Ancrene Wisse" [The author explores the reading experience that the "Ancrene Wisse" afforded the anchoress. Though intended as a guide book, it also encouraged the devout reader to experience Christ's life and thus transcend the limits of the anchorhold. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003.  Pages 113 - 144.
Year of Publication: 2003.

28. Record Number: 11655
Author(s): Evans, Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Jew, the Host and the Virgin Martyr: Fantasies of the Sentient Body [The author takes a late thirteenth century account of host desecration in Paris and explicates it with reference to Middle English virgin martyr stories. Evans argues that cultural meanings of anti-semitism and the body inform these narratives and define the values that matter. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Virginities.   Edited by Anke Bernau, Ruth Evans, and Sarah Salih .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages series. University of Wales Press; University of Toronto Press, 2003.  Pages 167 - 186.
Year of Publication: 2003.

29. Record Number: 8073
Author(s): Riddy, Felicity.
Contributor(s):
Title : Looking Closely: Authority and Intimacy in the Late Medieval Urban Home [The author explores the meanings of "home" and "homeliness" in late medieval English texts. She argues that it was a place where women took care of all the needs of the body. The author suggests that this kind of intimacy promoted a certain egalitarian attitude in the bourgeois home. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003.  Pages 212 - 228.
Year of Publication: 2003.

30. Record Number: 11434
Author(s): Dunlop, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Flesh and the Feminine: Early-Renaissance Images of the Madonna with Eve at Her Feet
Source: Oxford Art Journal , 25., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 127 - 147.
Year of Publication: 2002.

31. Record Number: 10531
Author(s): Colwell, Tania.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Masculinities: Transgressions and Transformations
Source: Our Medieval Heritage: Essays in Honour of John Tillotson for His 60th Birthday.   Edited by Linda Rasmussen, Valerie Spear, and Dianne Tillotson .   Merton Priory Press, 2002.  Pages 137 - 156.
Year of Publication: 2002.

32. Record Number: 11032
Author(s): Davis, Isabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Consuming the Body of the Working Man in the Later Middle Ages [The author argues for a more nuanced reading of the working man's body. Davis cites literary texts in which the male peasant is associated with food and sustenance while other texts emphasize the pain and bodily disfigurement that the work brings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. Oxford Art Journal , 25., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 42 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2002.

33. Record Number: 6636
Author(s): Easton, Martha.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pain, Torture, and Death in the Huntington Library "Legenda aurea" [The author analyzes the manuscript illuminations representing the torture and executions of male and female martyrs, arguing that the binary system of gender was frequently transcended].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002.  Pages 49 - 64.
Year of Publication: 2002.

34. Record Number: 8313
Author(s): Brown, Jennifer N.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Rule of St. Benedict and Envisioning Jesus [The author compares Julian of Norwich's approach to knowing Christ with that of the Benedictine Rule. While the Rule emphasizes Christ's divinity, Julian stresses Christ's humanity and meditates on it through her own corporeality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Magistra , 8., 2 (Winter 2002):  Pages 62 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2002.

35. Record Number: 10459
Author(s): Prendergast, Thomas A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Invisible Spouse: Henry VI, Arthur, and the Fifteenth-Century Subject [The author examines two narratives concerned with sovereignty and the queen's body: "Collectarium mansuetudinum et bonorum morum regis Henrici VI" by John Blacman, Henry VI's spiritual director, and Malory's "Morte Darthur." In both texts the threat to the king lies in the queen's body. Her sexual and political powers call the king's authority and his relationship with his subjects into question. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 32, 2 (Spring 2002): 305-326. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

36. Record Number: 7442
Author(s): Dockray-Miller, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Maternal Performance of the Virgin Mary in the Old English "Advent"
Source: NWSA Journal , 14., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 38 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2002.

37. Record Number: 10457
Author(s): Blanton-Whetsell, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tota integra, tota incorrupta: The Shrine of St. Aethelthryth as Symbol of Monastic Autonomy [The author examines the "Liber Eliensis," a Latin compilation of charters, deeds, and other documents chronicling the history of Saint Etheldreda, her shrine, and the male monastery on the island of Ely. Norman monks were introduced to Ely by William the Conqueror, but they identified with their protective saint against both royal and episcopal interests. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 32, 2 (Spring 2002): 227-267. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

38. Record Number: 9333
Author(s): Cain, James D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Unnatural History: Gender and Genealogy in Gerald of Wales's "Topographia Hibernica" [In his text, the "Topographia Hibernica," Giradus Cambrensis had two major complaints about the Irish: their sexual immorality and their difficulties in organizing themselves politically. He saw these as symptoms of the lack of self-restraint which plagued the country in many different ways. The Anglo-Normans attempted to impose order in Ireland through inheritance favoring the eldest son and marriage according to the dictates of the Church. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 29-43. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

39. Record Number: 6209
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Hero Through a Modernist Painter's Eyes: David Jones and the Pictorial Re-presentation of Lancelot
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002.
Year of Publication: 2002.

40. Record Number: 6204
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Subverting Tradition: The Transformed Female in Hildegard of Bingen's Scivias
Source: Seeing Gender: Perspectives on Medieval Gender and Sexuality. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, King's College, London, January 4-6, 2002. .  2002.
Year of Publication: 2002.

41. Record Number: 6633
Author(s): Murray, Jacqueline.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Law of Sin That is in My Members: The Problem of Male Embodiment [the author argues that there was a problem not only with women's bodies but with men's as well; there was a fundamental dis-ease with the male body and its manifestations of sexuality as seen in such examples as Abelard's castration and the problem of nocturnal emissions].
Source: Gender and Holiness: Men, Women, and Saints in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Samantha J. E. Riches and Sarah Salih .   Routledge, 2002.  Pages 9 - 22.
Year of Publication: 2002.

42. Record Number: 8306
Author(s): Gunn, Cate.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse: A Modern Lay Person's Guide to a Medieval Religious Text [The author argues that the "Ancrene Wisse" needs to be read carefully with reference to its historical context, modern scholarly theories, and spiritual environment. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Magistra , 8., 1 (Summer 2002):  Pages 3 - 25.
Year of Publication: 2002.

43. Record Number: 8474
Author(s): Resnick, Irven M.
Contributor(s):
Title : PS.- Albert the Great on the Physiognomy of Jesus and Mary [The author analyzes the Latin text "Mariale" which in earlier years was attributed to Albert the Great. The "Mariale" author used medical and philosophical authorities to establish the most perfect human bodies for Mary and Christ. In so doing, the author makes Mary a real historical person, rather than a theological symbol. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mediaeval Studies , 64., ( 2002):  Pages 217 - 240.
Year of Publication: 2002.

44. Record Number: 11035
Author(s): McAvoy, Liz Herbert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ant Nes He Him Seolf Reclus i Maries Wombe?: Julian of Norwich, the Anchorhold, and Redemption of the Monstrous Female Body [The author explores the themes of suffering and enclosure as characteristically feminine phenomena which gave anchoresses access to the divine. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Consuming Narrative: Gender and Monstrous Appetite in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance.   Edited by Liz Herbert McAvoy and Teresa Walters .   University of Wales Press, 2002. Mediaeval Studies , 64., ( 2002):  Pages 128 - 143.
Year of Publication: 2002.

45. Record Number: 5373
Author(s): Passenier, Anke E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Life of Christina Mirabilis: Miracles and the Construction of Marginality
Source: Women and Miracle Stories: A Multidisciplinary Exploration.   Edited by Anne-Marie Korte Studies in the History of Religions, 88.   Brill, 2001. New Medieval Literatures , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 145 - 178.
Year of Publication: 2001.

46. Record Number: 7909
Author(s): Bott, Robin L.
Contributor(s):
Title : O, Keep Me from Their Worse Than Killing Lust: Ideologies of Rape and Mutilation in Chaucer's "Physician's Tale" and Shakespeare's "Titus Andronicus"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Oxford Art Journal , 25., 2 ( 2002):  Pages 189 - 211.
Year of Publication: 2001.

47. Record Number: 10645
Author(s): Karkov, Catherine E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Broken Bodies and Singing Tongues: Gender and Voice in the Cambridge, Corpus Christi College 23 "Psychomachia" [The author argues that the Anglo-Saxon reader of the "Psychomachia" and the "Passio Sancti Romani" (also by Prudentius) was encouraged through text and illustrations to see the self as masculine and the body as feminine. Karkov notes that the Anglo-Saxon "Psychomachia" manuscripts were the first to depict the Virtues and Vices as primarily female, rather than the earlier practice of Virtues as male warriors and the Vices as monsters. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 30., ( 2001):  Pages 115 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2001.

48. Record Number: 6067
Author(s): Mortimer, Julia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reflections in "The Myroure of Oure Ladye": The Translation of a Desiring Body [the author analyzes a number of Brigittine texts, in particular the "Myroure of Oure Ladye" written for the nuns at Syon; the author notes the efforts made to minimize Bridget's individual voice and the instances where Bridget identifies herself with the Virgin Mary's experiences through dissolving body boundaries].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 27., 2 (June 2001):  Pages 58 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2001.

49. Record Number: 6022
Author(s): Wailes, Stephen L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beyond Virginity: Flesh and Spirit in the Plays of Hrotsvit of Gandersheim [the author argues that the theme of Hrotsvit's plays is the flesh versus the spirit not virginity as many earlier critics have maintained; the author uses the heroines' names for the titles of four of the plays ("Agape, Chiona, and Hurena" in place of "Dulcitius"; "Drusiana" in place of "Calimachus"; "Maria" in place of "Abraham"; and "Thais" in place of "Pafnutius") while the author retains the traditional titles for "Gallicanus" and "Sapientia"].
Source: Full-text of Dulcitus andGallicanus in English (from the Medieval Sourcebook)
Year of Publication: 2001.

50. Record Number: 6080
Author(s): Stephens, Rebecca.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Word Translated: Incarnation and Carnality in Gertrud the Great [The author argues that Gertrud finds salvation in the body of Christ with an erotic, sensual delight in the love of God].
Source: Magistra , 7., 1 (Summer 2001):  Pages 67 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2001.

51. Record Number: 6927
Author(s): Dronzek, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Theories of Education in Fifteenth-Century Conduct Books [The author compares texts written for boys and girls and argues that medieval ideas about gender affected both content and teaching methods. Boys learned visually, could handle abstract ideas, and did not need examples of violence to ensure obedience, while girls learned by listening, could only understand the concrete, and had to be threatened with corporal punishment regularly to preserve their sexual purity and by extension the family's honor. The texts the author analyzes are: For girls: "The Good Wife Taught Her Daughter" "The Good Wyfe Wold a Pylgremage" "The Book of the Knight of the Tower" For boys: "The Babees Book" "Lerne or Be Lewde" "The ABC of Aristotle" "Urbanitatis" "The Lytylle Childrenes Lytil Boke" "The Young Children's Book" "Stans puer ad mensam" "How the Wise Man Taught His Son" "The Boke of Curtasye" "Symon's Lesson of Wysedome for All Maner Chyldryn." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Conduct.   Edited by Kathleen Ashley and Robert L. A. Clark .   Medieval Cultures, Volume 29. University of Minnesota Press, 2001. Magistra , 7., 1 (Summer 2001):  Pages 135 - 159.
Year of Publication: 2001.

52. Record Number: 5964
Author(s): Bernau, Anke.
Contributor(s):
Title : Matters of the Heart: Hermaphrodites, Hyenas, and Metaphor
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Magistra , 7., 1 (Summer 2001):
Year of Publication: 2001.

53. Record Number: 8549
Author(s): Amsler, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affective Literacy: Gestures of Reading in the Later Middle Ages [The author uses "affective literacy" to mean the ways people develop emotional, gestural, and other physical relationships with texts. He argues that the "Ancrene Wisse" regulated its readers' devotional, physical, and affective behaviors. Transgressive literacy, in which readers touched or kissed images, gave them a relationship with sacred texts which came close to that of clerics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies: Proceeding of the Illinois Medieval Association (Full Text via Project Muse) 18 (2001): 83-110 Link Info
Year of Publication: 2001.

54. Record Number: 11158
Author(s): Lodge, Kristine Funch.
Contributor(s):
Title : Holy Soul and Wholly Breast: The Implications of Objectification in AElfric's "Life of Agatha"
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

55. Record Number: 6666
Author(s): Hilles, Carroll.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Politics in Osbern Bokenham's Legendary [the author argues that Bokenham's works advance the claim of Richard, duke of York, for the throne; not only does Bokenham question Lancastrian political hegemony, in part by denying the authority of the literature patronized by the court, but also "Bokenham strategically deploys 'woman' as signifier of privacy, piety, and humility to develop a language of political dissent which anticipates the tactics of later Yorkist propaganda." (page 209)].
Source: New Medieval Literatures , 4., ( 2001):  Pages 189 - 212.
Year of Publication: 2001.

56. Record Number: 4869
Author(s): Natvig, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rich Clares, Poor Clares: Celebrating the Divine Office ["The goal of this study is to trace the role of music in the Clarissan liturgy throughout the development of the order, from its origins in the early thirteenth century through its reform more than two hundred years later. Most of the extant evidence comes from the interpretation of numerous rules that governed the sisters." (Page. 60). Appendices include two extracts from the "Acta sanctorum" that describe how the Poor Clares celebrate the Divine Office, an extract from "Historiae seu vitae sanctorum" by Surius again describing the performance of the Office, and a list of polyphonic manuscripts with possible connections to the convents of St. Clare].
Source: Women and Music , 4., ( 2000):  Pages 59 - 70.
Year of Publication: 2000.

57. Record Number: 5056
Author(s): Scheil, Andrew P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodies and Boundaries in the Old English "Life of St. Mary of Egypt"
Source: Neophilologus , 84., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 137 - 156.
Year of Publication: 2000.

58. Record Number: 5462
Author(s): Boklund-Lagopoulou, Karin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Yate of Heven: Conceptions of the Female Body in the Religious Lyrics [The author explores a variety of images including Jesus as nourishing mother, the soul as the bride of Christ, the body as the site of decay and corruption, and the closed, virginal body].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000. Anglo-Saxon England , 30., ( 2001):  Pages 133 - 154.
Year of Publication: 2000.

59. Record Number: 4614
Author(s): Park, Katharine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Review Essay: Fallen Bodies: Pollution, Sexuality, and Demonology in the Middle Ages by Dyan Elliott
Source: Church History , 69., 4 (December 2000):  Pages 860 - 866.
Year of Publication: 2000.

60. Record Number: 4764
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodily Peril: Sexuality and the Subversion of Order in Jean de Meun's "Roman de la Rose"
Source: Modern Language Review , 95., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 41 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2000.

61. Record Number: 4839
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Textualizing and Contextualizing Hildegard's Body in Theoderic's "Vita"
Source: Magistra , 6., 1 (Summer 2000):  Pages 89 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2000.

62. Record Number: 4469
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Written on the Body: Reading Rape from the Twelfth to Fifteenth Centuries [the author argues that English law and legal treatises give evidence of three phases over time in the understanding of rape: 1) The raped body as bleeding and violently assaulted 2) Rape as the violation of virginity 3) The raped body as absent, a body that has been feloniously abducted].
Source: Medieval Women and the Law.   Edited by Noël James Menuge .   Boydell Press, 2000. Magistra , 6., 1 (Summer 2000):  Pages 125 - 144.
Year of Publication: 2000.

63. Record Number: 5557
Author(s): Caciola, Nancy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mystics, Demoniacs, and the Physiology of Spirit Possession in Medieval Europe
Source: Comparative Studies in Society and History , 42., 2 (April 2000):  Pages 268 - 306.
Year of Publication: 2000.

64. Record Number: 4245
Author(s): Farmer, Sharon.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Beggar's Body: Intersections of Gender and Social Status in High Medieval Paris [The author argues that gender must be viewed within a matrix of other factors including social status; she examines the case of lower status men who, in the eyes of the elite, had an association with the body as did women].
Source: Monks and Nuns, Saints and Outcasts: Religion in Medieval Society. Essays in Honor of Lester K. Little.   Edited by Sharon Farmer and Barbara H. Rosenwein .   Cornell University Press, 2000. Comparative Studies in Society and History , 42., 2 (April 2000):  Pages 153 - 171.
Year of Publication: 2000.

65. Record Number: 4642
Author(s): Polinska, Wioleta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodies Under Siege: Eating Disorders and Self-Mutilation Among Women [The author compares and contrasts present-day eating disorders with medieval holy women's behaviors and suggests that in both cases women are seeking self-determination and autonomy].
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 68., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 569 - 589.
Year of Publication: 2000.

66. Record Number: 5465
Author(s): Renevey, Denis.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery's Performing Body: The Translation of Late Medieval Discursive Religious Practices
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000. Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 68., 3 (September 2000):  Pages 197 - 216.
Year of Publication: 2000.

67. Record Number: 4411
Author(s): Heywood, Melinda Marsh.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Withered Rose: Seduction and the Poetics of Old Age in the "Roman de la Rose" of Guillaume de Lorris [The author argues that the poet uses the two old women characters to remind his beloved that she too will one day be old, ugly, and alone; she has no choice but to grant him her favors quickly].
Source: French Forum , 25., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 5 - 22.
Year of Publication: 2000.

68. Record Number: 10128
Author(s): Healey, Claire.
Contributor(s):
Title : Strange Creatures: Masculinity in the Exeter Book Riddles
Source: Old English Newsletter , 33., 3 (Spring 2000): Paper presented at the International Medieval Congress, University of Leeds, July 10-13, 2000, Session 301: "Groping in the Dark Ages: The Search for the Anglo-Saxon Body."
Year of Publication: 2000.

69. Record Number: 3996
Author(s): Davidson, Clifford.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nudity, the Body, and Early English Drama [The author explores the context in which nudity was presented on the stage, dealing in most cases with the representation of Jesus.]
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 98., 4 (October 1999):  Pages 499 - 522.
Year of Publication: 1999.

70. Record Number: 3714
Author(s): Zeitler, Barbara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ostentatio genitalium : Displays of Nudity in Byzantinum
Source: Desire and Denial in Byzantium: Papers from the Thirty-First Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, March 1997.   Edited by Liz James. Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies, Publications 6 .   Variorum (Ashgate Publishing), 1999. JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 98., 4 (October 1999):  Pages 185 - 201.
Year of Publication: 1999.

71. Record Number: 3715
Author(s): Cameron, Averil.
Contributor(s):
Title : Desire in Byzantium- the Ought and the Is [The author contrasts religious desire with sexual passion].
Source: Desire and Denial in Byzantium: Papers from the Thirty-First Spring Symposium of Byzantine Studies, University of Sussex, Brighton, March 1997.   Edited by Liz James. Society for the Promotion of Byzantine Studies, Publications 6 .   Variorum (Ashgate Publishing), 1999. JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 98., 4 (October 1999):  Pages 205 - 213.
Year of Publication: 1999.

72. Record Number: 4268
Author(s): Carlson, Cindy L. and Angela Jane Weisl
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity [The authors explore the themes in the essays and argue that both widowhood and virginity carry multiple meanings in the Middle Ages].
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Neophilologus , 84., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 1 - 21.
Year of Publication: 1999.

73. Record Number: 3543
Author(s): Rodgers, Susan and Joanna E. Ziegler
Contributor(s):
Title : Elisabeth of Spalbeek's Trance Dance of Faith: A Performance Theory Interpretation from Anthropological and Art Historical Perspectives
Source: Performance and Transformation: New Approaches to Late Medieval Spirituality.   Edited by Mary A. Suydam and Joanna E. Ziegler .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Neophilologus , 84., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 299 - 355.
Year of Publication: 1999.

74. Record Number: 10160
Author(s): Lacroix, Jean.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Nus du "Decameron" (pour une erotique Boccacienne)
Source: Études Médiévales , 1., ( 1999):  Pages 129 - 148.
Year of Publication: 1999.

75. Record Number: 10652
Author(s): Heene, Katrien.
Contributor(s):
Title : Deliberate Self-Harm and Gender in Medieval Saints' Lives [The author argues that both women and lower status men use self-inflicted harm as a means of atonement, self-discipline, and devotion to Christ. However, in cases where women sought to avoid marriage, self-mutilation could play a special role. Also in some cases, self-harm served as a didactic example, allowing women the unusual opportunity to act as teachers and preachers. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 6., ( 1999):  Pages 213 - 231.
Year of Publication: 1999.

76. Record Number: 14694
Author(s): Müller, Daniela.
Contributor(s):
Title : Les Connotations Féminines dans l'image cathare de Dieu. Ses conséquences dans la pratique [The author examines Cathar doctrine, as it is known, for female elements. She also uses historical evidence of practices. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Heresis: Revue d'hérésiologie médiévale. Edition de Textes-Recherche , 31., ( 1999):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1999.

77. Record Number: 3549
Author(s): Hollywood, Amy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Inside Out: Beatrice of Nazareth and Her Hagiographer [The author compares a "vita" about Beatrice of Nazareth with her own writing "Seven Manners of Loving God" ; the author finds the texts quite different especially in Beatrice's exploration of the interplay between interiority and exteriority].
Source: Gendered Voices: Medieval Saints and Their Interpreters.   Edited by Catherine M. Mooney .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999. Neophilologus , 84., 1 (January 2000):  Pages 78 - 98.
Year of Publication: 1999.

78. Record Number: 3929
Author(s): Kim, Susan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bloody Signs: Circumcision and Pregnancy in the Old English Judith [The author argues that the beheading of Holofernes can be read as a castration or circumcision while the severed head of Holofernes figures as the result of Judith's symbolic pregnancy].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 11., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 285 - 307.
Year of Publication: 1999.

79. Record Number: 4273
Author(s): Chewning, Susannah Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Paradox of Virginity within the Anchoritic Tradition: The Masculine Gaze and the Feminine Body in the "Wohunge" Group
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 11., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 113 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1999.

80. Record Number: 4277
Author(s): Roberts, Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Like a Virgin: Mary and Her Doubters in the N-Town Cycle
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 11., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 199 - 217.
Year of Publication: 1999.

81. Record Number: 4274
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Useful Virgins in Medieval Hagiography [among the virgin martyrs discussed are Thecla, Euphemia, Agnes, Agatha, and Lucy].
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 11., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 135 - 164.
Year of Publication: 1999.

82. Record Number: 4375
Author(s): Wiberg Pedersen, Else Marie
Contributor(s):
Title : The In-Carnation of Beatrice of Nazareth's Theology [The author compares the writing of Beatrice's hagiographer with her own texts; The hagiographer embodies her holiness in her illnesses and her bodily exercises while Beatirce makes God the focus of all her reflections].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 11., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 61 - 79.
Year of Publication: 1999.

83. Record Number: 3654
Author(s): Dressler, Rachel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Steel Corpse: Imaging the Knight in Death [The author argues that British tomb effigies constructed an elite, warrior masculinity].
Source: Conflicted Identities and Multiple Masculinities: Men in the Medieval West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray .   Garland Medieval Casebooks, volume 25. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, volume 2078. Garland Publishing, 1999. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 11., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 135 - 167.
Year of Publication: 1999.

84. Record Number: 4272
Author(s): Salih, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing Virginity: Sex and Violence in the "Katherine" Group
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 11., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 95 - 112.
Year of Publication: 1999.

85. Record Number: 3799
Author(s): Fein, David A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Dangerous Sex: Representations of the Female Body in the "Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles" [the author surveys four stories from the "Cent Nouvelles Nouvelles" in which the women with their dangerous sexuality take the upperhand and leave the men thwarted and frequently injured].
Source: Romance Notes , 39., 2 (Winter 1999):  Pages 195 - 202.
Year of Publication: 1999.

86. Record Number: 4212
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate.
Contributor(s):
Title : Enemies Within/ Enemies Without: Threats to the Body Politic in Christine de Pizan
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 26., ( 1999):  Pages 1 - 15. Special issue: Civil Strife and National Identity in the Middle Ages.
Year of Publication: 1999.

87. Record Number: 3651
Author(s): Murray, Jacqueline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mystical Castration: Some Reflections on Peter Abelard, Hugh of Lincoln, and Sexual Control
Source: Conflicted Identities and Multiple Masculinities: Men in the Medieval West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray .   Garland Medieval Casebooks, volume 25. Garland Reference Library of the Humanities, volume 2078. Garland Publishing, 1999. Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 26., ( 1999):  Pages 73 - 91.
Year of Publication: 1999.

88. Record Number: 5043
Author(s): Pulsiano, Phillip.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blessed Bodies: The "Vitae" of Anglo-Saxon Female Saints ["More specifically, I am interested in reading these "vitae" as gendered texts, wherein are inscribed perceptions of the female religious that mark the narratives as requiring from reader and compositor alike the appropriation and also construction of sets of conventions different from those of male "vitae" and centered, most prominently, on chastity and, by implication, on the woman's body as source of sanctity and power but also as the locus of sexuality and violence, whether in the form of enforced marriage, attempted rape, psychological persecution, physical torture, murder, or self-mutilation." (Pages 11-12)].
Source: Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies, New Series , 16., 2 (January 1999):  Pages 1 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1999.

89. Record Number: 4314
Author(s): Overing, Gillian R.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Body in Question: Aging, Community and Gender in Medieval Iceland [The author argues that old women were stereotyped as nasty gossips or agents of evil unless there were mitigating factors of wealth, status, or class].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 29., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 211 - 225.
Year of Publication: 1999.

90. Record Number: 3055
Author(s): Randolph, Adrian W. B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Performing the Bridal Body in Fifteenth-Century Florence
Source: Art History , 21., 2 (June 1998):  Pages 182 - 200.
Year of Publication: 1998.

91. Record Number: 4291
Author(s): Emerson, Jan S.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Poetry of Silence: Relating Body and Soul in the "Scivias" [The author argues that Hildegard sought to integrate the body with the soul in practical as well as philosophical terms].
Source: Hildegard of Bingen: A book of Essays.   Edited by Maud Burnett McInerney .   Garland Publishing, 1998. Art History , 21., 2 (June 1998):  Pages 77 - 101.
Year of Publication: 1998.

92. Record Number: 4400
Author(s): Murray, Jacqueline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Souls in Sexed Bodies: The Male Construction of Female Sexuality in Some Medieval Confessors' Manuals [The author analyzes some fifteen confessors' manuals from the 13th century; she finds that they limit discussion of women to their sexual functions, emphasizing their sexual passivity and their danger to men as sexual temptations].
Source: Handling Sin: Confession in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Peter Biller and A.J. Minnis York Studies in Medieval Theology .   York Medieval Press, 1998. Art History , 21., 2 (June 1998):  Pages 79 - 93.
Year of Publication: 1998.

93. Record Number: 5555
Author(s): Schein, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Female-Men of God" and "Men Who Were Women." Female Saints and Holy Land Pilgrimage During the Byzantine Period [The author considers the Roman aristocratic women who made pilgrimages to Jerusalem and, when pilgrimage for women was discouraged, the stories of transvestite female saints who also came to Jerusalem; in both groups an ascetic way of life allowed them to transcend their sinfulness and make a sincere conversion; the appendices present a list of women pilgrims to Jerusalem and a shorter list of transvestite female pilgrims].
Source: Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 5., ( 1998):  Pages 1 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1998.

94. Record Number: 5578
Author(s): Tejera Llano, Dionisia,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Portrayal of Female Sainthood in Renaissance San Gimignano: Ghirlandio's Frescoes of Santa Fina's Legend
Source: Artibus et Historiae , 19., 38 ( 1998):  Pages 143 - 170.
Year of Publication: 1998.

95. Record Number: 3201
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Violence of Exegesis: Reading the Bodies of AEIfric's Female Saints [Saints Agatha, Lucy, and Agnes].
Source: Violence Against Women in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Anna Roberts .   University Press of Florida, 1998. Artibus et Historiae , 19., 38 ( 1998):  Pages 22 - 43.
Year of Publication: 1998.

96. Record Number: 3333
Author(s): Koutava-Delivoria, Barbara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Figures féminines dans la littérature mariale (XIIe- XIlIe siècles) [The author analyses three stories from Gautier de Coinci's "Miracles de Nostre Dame: the Empress, Saint Leocadie, and the Young Girl from Arras].
Source: Moyen Age , 104., 40241 ( 1998):  Pages 435 - 459.
Year of Publication: 1998.

97. Record Number: 4352
Author(s): Williamson, Beth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin "Lactans" as Second Eve: Image of the "Salvatrix" [the author analyzes the iconography of a painting by Carlo da Camerino, depicting the Virgin nursing the infant Christ with Eve reclining below; Margaret Miles had argued that the painting juxtaposes Mary's goodness with Eve's sinful body (and the bodies of the female viewers); the author argues that the panel creates a "complex allegory not only of the Virgin's centrality to human redemption but also of Eve's crucial role in this process"].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 19., ( 1998):  Pages 105 - 138.
Year of Publication: 1998.

98. Record Number: 4353
Author(s): Paxson, James J.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Nether-Faced Devil and the Allegory of Parturition [The author argues that the representation of the devil with a face in place of its genitals draws on the allegory of childbirth and thereby demonizes the female sexual body].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 19., ( 1998):  Pages 139 - 176.
Year of Publication: 1998.

99. Record Number: 5434
Author(s): Paxson, James J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender Personified, Personification Gendered, and the Body Figuralized in "Piers Plowman" [The author first considers the tradition of personifications embodied as females and then argues that the gender of Meed and Anima are key feature in Langland's allegory].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 65 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1998.

100. Record Number: 3046
Author(s): Airlie, Stuart.
Contributor(s):
Title : Private Bodies and the Body Politic in the Divorce Case of Lothar II [Lothar II tried over the course of more than fifteen years to rid himself of his wife Theutberga in order to marry his concubine Waldrada].
Source: Past and Present , 161., (November 1998):  Pages 3 - 38.
Year of Publication: 1998.

101. Record Number: 3143
Author(s): Price, Richard M.
Contributor(s):
Title : God is More Weary of Woman Than of Man: Reflections on a Text in the "Golden Legend" [analysis of the Biblical text in which the birth of a girl causes uncleanness for twice as long as the birth of a boy].
Source: Gender and Christian religion: papers read at the 1996 Summer Meeting and the 1997 Winter Meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society.   Edited by R. N. Swanson Studies in Church History, 34.  1998. Past and Present , 161., (November 1998):  Pages 119 - 127.
Year of Publication: 1998.

102. Record Number: 3526
Author(s): Townsend, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the Single Amazon in Twelfth-Century Latin Epic
Source: The Tongue of the Fathers: Gender and Ideology in Twelfth-Century Latin.   Edited by David Townsend and Andrew Taylor .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. Past and Present , 161., (November 1998):  Pages 136 - 155.
Year of Publication: 1998.

103. Record Number: 3059
Author(s): Smith, Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Mystical Self in the "Book of Divine Consolation of the Blessed Angela of Foligno"
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 24., 1 (March 1998):  Pages 8 - 22.
Year of Publication: 1998.

104. Record Number: 1599
Author(s): Lewis, Flora.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wound in Christ's Side and the Instruments of the Passion: Gendered Experience and Response [images of sexual union and childbirth as well as knightly combat were used by both women and men to contemplate the Passion].
Source: Women and the Book: Assessing the Visual Evidence.   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H.M. Taylor .   British Library and University of Toronto Press, 1997. New Medieval Literatures , 1., ( 1997):  Pages 204 - 229.
Year of Publication: 1997.

105. Record Number: 4342
Author(s): Luscombe, David
Contributor(s):
Title : Peter Abelard's Carnal Thoughts [The author examines Abelard's arguments about the relationships among body, soul, and intentionality; the author concludes by analyzing the discussion between Abelard and Heloise concerning the Rule for the Paraclete].
Source: Medieval Theology and the Natural Body.   Edited by Peter Biller and A.J. Minnis York Studies in Medieval Theology .   York Medieval Press, 1997. New Medieval Literatures , 1., ( 1997):  Pages 31 - 41.
Year of Publication: 1997.

106. Record Number: 4344
Author(s): Biller, Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cathars and Material Women [The author explores the historiography of the issue and calls into question the idea that Cathars offered positive roles for women].
Source: Medieval Theology and the Natural Body.   Edited by Peter Biller and A.J. Minnis York Studies in Medieval Theology .   York Medieval Press, 1997. New Medieval Literatures , 1., ( 1997):  Pages 61 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1997.

107. Record Number: 4345
Author(s): Minnis, A.J.
Contributor(s):
Title : De impedimento sexus: Women's Bodies and Medieval Impediments to Female Ordination
Source: Medieval Theology and the Natural Body.   Edited by Peter Biller and A.J. Minnis York Studies in Medieval Theology .   York Medieval Press, 1997. New Medieval Literatures , 1., ( 1997):  Pages 109 - 139.
Year of Publication: 1997.

108. Record Number: 4346
Author(s): Elliott, Dyan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Physiology of Rapture and Female Spirituality [The author examines the relationship between body and soul in the phenomenon of rapture; the female body in rapture is a site of ambiguity lending itself to demon possession and witchcraft].
Source: Medieval Theology and the Natural Body.   Edited by Peter Biller and A.J. Minnis York Studies in Medieval Theology .   York Medieval Press, 1997. New Medieval Literatures , 1., ( 1997):  Pages 141 - 173.
Year of Publication: 1997.

109. Record Number: 4347
Author(s): Voaden, Rosalynn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beholding Men's Members: The Sexualizing of Transgression in "The Book of Margery Kempe" [The author argues that Margery's sense of sin as well as punishment were mapped onto her sexuality].
Source: Medieval Theology and the Natural Body.   Edited by Peter Biller and A.J. Minnis York Studies in Medieval Theology .   York Medieval Press, 1997. New Medieval Literatures , 1., ( 1997):  Pages 175 - 190.
Year of Publication: 1997.

110. Record Number: 4431
Author(s): Murray, Jacqueline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men's Bodies, Men's Minds: Seminal Emissions and Sexual Anxiety in the Middle Ages [The author surveys theological and pastoral writings on men's emissions from Augustine through Jean Gerson. In the thirteenth century these practices came to be judged more harshly and were associated with masturbation as sins of lust. At the same time e
Source: Annual Review of Sex Research , 8., ( 1997):  Pages 1 - 26.
Year of Publication: 1997.

111. Record Number: 2214
Author(s): Burrows, Mark S.
Contributor(s):
Title : Yett He Sufferyth With Vs: Divine Asceticism in Julian of Norwich's "Revelation of Love"
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 7., ( 1997):  Pages 99 - 112.
Year of Publication: 1997.

112. Record Number: 2271
Author(s): Kraman, Cynthia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Communities of Otherness in Chaucer's "Merchant's Tale" [suggests that the female body, the Jewish text of the "Song of Songs," and the enclosed garden are all marginal elements that take on central importance at January's expense].
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997. Studies in Spirituality , 7., ( 1997):  Pages 138 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1997.

113. Record Number: 2907
Author(s): Otter, Monika.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Temptation of St. AEthelthryth
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 9., 1 (Spring 1997):  Pages 139 - 163.
Year of Publication: 1997.

114. Record Number: 2423
Author(s): Wickham-Crowley, Kelley M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gowther Among the Dogs: Becoming Inhuman c. 1400
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 9., 1 (Spring 1997):  Pages 219 - 244.
Year of Publication: 1997.

115. Record Number: 1834
Author(s): Bauerschmidt, Frederick Christian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing Jesus: Julian of Norwich and the Text of Christ's Body
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 27., 2 (Spring 1997):  Pages 189 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1997.

116. Record Number: 1832
Author(s): Lochrie, Karma.
Contributor(s):
Title : Desiring Foucault [analysis of the contradictions in Foucault's writings concerning sexuality in the Middle Ages].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 27, 1 (Winter 1997): 3-16. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

117. Record Number: 2413
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Body Doubles: Producing the Masculine "Corpus" [survey of varous images of the male medieval body as producer, laborer, moneymaker, and sodomite].
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997.  Pages 3 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1997.

118. Record Number: 2268
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : All Girls Together: Community , Gender, and Vision at Helfta [analysis of the environment at Helfta based on the writings of its visionaries: Mechthild of Hackeborn, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Gertrude the Great; the experience within this supportive community allowed Gertrude and Mechthild of Hackeborn to ascribe female characteristics to the divine that drew on images of female biology including enclosure, blood, and the vagina].
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997.  Pages 72 - 91.
Year of Publication: 1997.

119. Record Number: 2983
Author(s): Miller, Paul Allen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Laurel as the Sign of Sin: Laura's Textual Body in Petrarch's "Secretum"
Source: Sex and Gender in Medieval and Renaissance Texts: The Latin Tradition.   Edited by Barbara K. Gold, Paul Allen Miller, and Charles Platter .   State University of New York Press, 1997.  Pages 139 - 163.
Year of Publication: 1997.

120. Record Number: 2706
Author(s): Harding, Wendy.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Dynamics of Law in the "Clerk's Tale" [examines three relationships which embody the law: the interaction between lord and people, between husband and wife, and between God and believer].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 45 - 59.
Year of Publication: 1997.

121. Record Number: 2424
Author(s): Burger, Glenn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Erotic Discipline...Or "Tee Hee, I Like My Boys To Be Girls": Inventing With the Body in Chaucer's "Millers Tale"
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Chaucer Yearbook , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 245 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1997.

122. Record Number: 4597
Author(s): Visconsi, Elliott.
Contributor(s):
Title : She Represents the Person of Our Lord: The Performance of Mysticism in the "Vita" of Elisabeth of Spalbeek and "The Book of Margery Kempe" [this essay describes "how medieval women produced a mysticism beyond extant gender representations, a performative mysticism firmly grounded in the disorderliness of the female flesh as it enacts the 'imitatio Christi,' predicated on an educable audience, and finally to result in a subjectivity of self-annihilation" (Page 79)].
Source: Comitatus , 28., ( 1997):  Pages 76 - 89.
Year of Publication: 1997.

123. Record Number: 2099
Author(s): Nip, Renée.
Contributor(s):
Title : It's a Man's World: Recent Studies of Male Representation of the Female in the Middle Ages [book reviews][reviews nine books].
Source: Gender and History , 9., 1 (April 1997):  Pages 130 - 134.
Year of Publication: 1997.

124. Record Number: 1833
Author(s): Lees, Clare A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Engendering Religious Desire: Sex, Knowledge, and Christian Identity in Anglo- Saxon England [representations of the body, sexuality, and eroticism in vernacular literary culture].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 27, 1 (Winter 1997): 17-45. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

125. Record Number: 2121
Author(s): King, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading the Female Body [book reviews][review of three recent titles, one concerning the Middle Ages and the other two Classical Greece].
Source: Gender and History , 9., 3 (November 1997):  Pages 620 - 624.
Year of Publication: 1997.

126. Record Number: 2429
Author(s): Uebel, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : On Becoming-Male
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Gender and History , 9., 3 (November 1997):  Pages 367 - 384.
Year of Publication: 1997.

127. Record Number: 2704
Author(s): Evans, Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : When a Body Meets a Body: Fergus and Mary in the York Cycle [argues that the staging and audience reaction to the "other" embodied by the crossdressing actor as Mary and the feminized figure of Fergus the Jew play upon complex symbolisms of gender and social group].
Source: New Medieval Literatures , 1., ( 1997):  Pages 193 - 212.
Year of Publication: 1997.

128. Record Number: 770
Author(s): Hanawalt, Barbara A. and Susan Noakes
Contributor(s):
Title : Trial Transcript, Romance, Propaganda: Joan of Arc and the French Body Politic [a semiotic reading relying on both historical study and literary criticism; analysis of the trial transcript as well as the later introduction in terms of politics and gender].
Source: MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 57., 4 (Dec. 1996):  Pages 605 - 631.
Year of Publication: 1996.

129. Record Number: 2714
Author(s): Donovan, Michelle A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rewriting Hagiography: The "Livre de la cité des dames"
Source: Women in French Studies , 4., ( 1996):  Pages 14 - 26.
Year of Publication: 1996.

130. Record Number: 3646
Author(s): Lichtmann, Maria R.
Contributor(s):
Title : God Fulfylled my bodye: Body, Self, and God in Julian of Norwich
Source: Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages.   Edited by Jane Chance .   University Press of Florida, 1996. MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 57., 4 (Dec. 1996):  Pages 263 - 278.
Year of Publication: 1996.

131. Record Number: 24735
Author(s): Despres, Denise L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mary of the Eucharist: Cultic Anti-Judaism in Some Fourteenth-Century English Devotional Manuscripts
Source: From Witness to Witchcraft: Jews and Judaism in Medieval Christian Thought.   Edited by Jeremy Cohen .   Harrassowitz Verlag, 1996. Women in French Studies , 4., ( 1996):  Pages 375 - 401.
Year of Publication: 1996.

132. Record Number: 13838
Author(s): Gibson, Gail McMurray.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blessing from Sun and Moon: Churching as Women's Theater [The author argues for a more complex understanding of churching. While acknowledging the element of clerical misogyny, Gibson believes that women experienced a corporate identity and bodily power from the female-only ritual. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Bodies and Disciplines: Intersections of Literature and History in Fifteenth-Century England.   Edited by Barbara A. Hanawalt and David Wallace .   Medieval Cultures series, 9. University of Minnesota Press, 1996. MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 57., 4 (Dec. 1996):  Pages 139 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1996.

133. Record Number: 789
Author(s): Brandolino, Gina.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Chiefe and Principal Mene": Julian of Norwich's Redefining of the Body in "A Revelation of Love" [Julian recognizes the body's essential goodness, but not for what it can endure; it is Christ's suffering that offers true comfort].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 22., 3 (Sept. 1996):  Pages 102 - 110.
Year of Publication: 1996.

134. Record Number: 2382
Author(s): Schafer, Kava.
Contributor(s):
Title : We Entered the House of Realization, We Witnessed the Body [integration of the body and soul for female mystics].
Source: Studia Mystica New Series , 17., 2 ( 1996):  Pages 205 - 215.
Year of Publication: 1996.

135. Record Number: 3029
Author(s): Weiskopf, Steven.
Contributor(s):
Title : Readers of the Lost Arc: Secrecy, Specularity, and Speculation in the Trial of Joan of Arc
Source: Fresh Verdicts on Joan of Arc.   Edited by Bonnie Wheeler and Charles T. Wood .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Studia Mystica New Series , 17., 2 ( 1996):  Pages 113 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1996.

136. Record Number: 654
Author(s): Suydam, Mary A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Touch of Satisfaction: Visions and the Religious Experience According to Hadewijch of Antwerp [comparative analysis of Hadewijch's "Visions" with her "Letters" and "Mengeldichten." Emphasis on how she destabilizes dichotomies and hierarchies].
Source: Journal of Feminist Studies in Religion , 12., 2 (Fall 1996):  Pages 5 - 27.
Year of Publication: 1996.

137. Record Number: 871
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Struggle Over Mary's Body: Theological and Dramatic Resolution in the N- Town Assumption Play
Source: JEGP: Journal of English and Germanic Philology , 95., 2 (Apr. 1996):  Pages 190 - 203.
Year of Publication: 1996.

138. Record Number: 1851
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe: Spectacle and Spiritual Governance [argues that the active public spectacle of fits and weeping is a kind of martyrdom and a sign of Margery's contemplative attainments].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 75., 2 (Spring 1996):  Pages 137 - 166.
Year of Publication: 1996.

139. Record Number: 3682
Author(s): Hanna, Ralph, III
Contributor(s):
Title : Some NorFolk Women and Their Books, ca. 1390-1440 [the author explores two pair of women involved in literature culture: Margery Baxter and Avis Mone, two peasant women who were Lollards, and Margery Kempe and Julian of Norwich; the author argues that all four women were dependent on male clerics or teachers to translate and read texts to them and that women's attempts to fulfill themselves through the written word were very difficult].
Source: The Cultural Patronage of Medieval Women.   Edited by June Hall McCash .   University of Georgia Press, 1996. Philological Quarterly , 75., 2 (Spring 1996):  Pages 288 - 305.
Year of Publication: 1996.

140. Record Number: 2431
Author(s): Sinclair, Finn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Defending the Castle: Didactic Literature and the Containment of Female Sexuality [three didactic texts, written by and for men, advise that women need to be restrained morally and physically because of their immoderate sexual appetites].
Source: Reading Medieval Studies , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 5 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1996.

141. Record Number: 3641
Author(s): Pickens, Rupert T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France and the Body Poetic [The author examines Marie's poetics with regard to her preoccupation with the generation, transmission, and reception of discourse].
Source: Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages.   Edited by Jane Chance .   University Press of Florida, 1996. Reading Medieval Studies , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 135 - 171.
Year of Publication: 1996.

142. Record Number: 2550
Author(s): Beemer, Suzy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Asceticism, Masochism, and Female Autonomy: Catherine of Siena and "The Story of O"
Source: Studies in Medievalism , 8., ( 1996):  Pages 195 - 209.
Year of Publication: 1996.

143. Record Number: 2336
Author(s): Horner, Shari.
Contributor(s):
Title : Da nacodon word: Corporeal Hermeneutics in Aelfric's "Lives of Saints" [Saints Agatha, Agnes, and Lucy].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):
Year of Publication: 1996.

144. Record Number: 3645
Author(s): Mazzoni, Cristina.
Contributor(s):
Title : On the (Un) Representability of Woman's Pleasure: Angela of Foligno and Jacques Lacan
Source: Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages.   Edited by Jane Chance .   University Press of Florida, 1996. Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):  Pages 239 - 262.
Year of Publication: 1996.

145. Record Number: 1624
Author(s): Straus, Barrie Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Freedom Through Renunciation? Women's Voices, Women's Bodies, and the Phallic Order [female literary characters who want to abstain from sex].
Source: Desire and Discipline: Sex and Sexuality in the Premodern West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray and Konrad Eisenbichler .   University of Toronto Press, 1996. Old English Newsletter , 29., 3 (Spring 1996):  Pages 245 - 264.
Year of Publication: 1996.

146. Record Number: 1753
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Beauty Myth: An Aesthetics of Virginity [discusses the qualities that were most valued: slenderness, youth, virginity, and a meek and passive posture with a pulled-in chin and chest and a thrust-forward belly].
Source: Medieval Life , 5., (Summer 1996):  Pages 10 - 13.
Year of Publication: 1996.

147. Record Number: 339
Author(s): Dixon, Mimi Still.
Contributor(s):
Title : Thys Body of Mary: "Femynyte" and "Inward Mythe" in the "Digby Mary Magdalene"
Source: Mediaevalia , 18., ( 1995):  Pages 221 - 244. (1995 (for 1992)) Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1995.

148. Record Number: 1366
Author(s): Pasteur, Claude.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jean d'Aulon, écuyer de Jeanne d'Arc, ne pourra la sauver [article does not include footnotes or bibliography of sources consulted].
Source: Historia , 579., (mars 1995):  Pages 80 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1995.

149. Record Number: 5473
Author(s): Bornstein, Daniel E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Violenza al corpo di una santa: Fra agiographica e pornografia- A proposito di Douceline di Digne [Mortification of the flesh, including punishment of sexual organs, features prominently in the lives of holy women; Douceline of Digne is an extreme example of the phenomenon, becoming insensible to stimuli when in a trance; she became the presiding spirit of a beguinage in Marseille, and the community preserved her memory and developed her cult; during her lifetime, her body, when insensible, was subjected to tortures to gratify the curiosity of men; this served both as a test of her sanctity and as a kind of counter-pornography, intended to produce revulsion against the flesh; often, however, trial was made by the merely curious, like Charles of Anjou and his entourage].
Source: Quaderni Medievali , 39., (giugno 1995):  Pages 31 - 46.
Year of Publication: 1995.

150. Record Number: 6625
Author(s): Papka, Claudia Rattazzi.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Written Woman Writes: Caterina da Siena Between History and Hagiography, Body, and Text [the author argues that Catherine constructs her sanctity based on her body, both in terms of bodily suffering and her mystical assimiliation to the body of Christ, which allows her to take public action and have a public voice; her hagiographer Raymond of Capua prefers to emphasize gender, especially its negative stereotypes, and denies the body].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 131 - 149. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

151. Record Number: 348
Author(s): Hale, Rosemary Drage.
Contributor(s):
Title : Taste and See, For God Is Sweet: Sensory Perception and Memory in Medieval Christian Mystical Experience
Source: Vox Mystica: Essays on Medieval Mysticism in Honor of Professor Valerie M Lagorio.   Edited by Anne Clark Bartlett, Thomas H. Bestul, Janet Goebel, and William F. Pollard .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 3 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1995.

152. Record Number: 617
Author(s): Biscoglio, Frances M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fragmentation and Reconstruction: Images of the Female Body in "Ancrene Wisse" and the Katherine Group [images of the erotic, the maternal, the ascetic, and of fertility represent the union of the anchoress with Christ].
Source: Comitatus , 26., ( 1995):  Pages 27 - 52. [Contributions are accepted from graduate students and those who have received their doctorates within the last three years]
Year of Publication: 1995.

153. Record Number: 1530
Author(s): Scheelar, Margo Husby.
Contributor(s):
Title : El Auto IX y la Destronizacion de Melibea [The author uses Bakhtin's theory of the carnivalesque to examine the descriptions of Melibea in Act Nine].
Source: Celestinesca , 19., 40180 ( 1995):  Pages 57 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1995.

154. Record Number: 231
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bride Stripped Bare: A Rare Type of the Disrobing of Christ
Source: Gesta (Full Text via JSTOR) 34, 2 (1995): 126-146. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1995.

155. Record Number: 435
Author(s): Lomperis, Linda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bodies That Matter in the Court of Late Medieval England and in Chaucer's "Miller's Tale" [Alisoun as a female impersonator and male homoeroticism at the court of Richard II].
Source: Romanic Review , 86., 2 (March 1995):  Pages 243 - 264. Special issue: The Production of Knowledge: Institutionalizing Sex, Gender, and Sexualiity in Medieval Discourse. Ed. by Kathryn Gravdal.
Year of Publication: 1995.

156. Record Number: 1121
Author(s): Sagnella, Mary Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Absent Lover in Angela da Foligno's "Liber"
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 21., 3 (September 1995):  Pages 73 - 79.
Year of Publication: 1995.

157. Record Number: 6622
Author(s): Sagnella, Mary Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : Carnal Metaphors and Mystical Discourse in Angela da Foligno's "Liber" [The author argues that Angela's self-hate and mortification of her body awakened her senses and led her to mystical union with Christ's body].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 79 - 90. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

158. Record Number: 498
Author(s): Horner, Shari.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Violence of Exegesis: Reading the Bodies of Aelfric's Saints [Thirtieth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 4-7, 1995. Thirtieth Symposium on the Sources of Anglo- Saxon Culture, co- sponsered by the Institute and CEMERS, Binghamton University. Session 247.]
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

159. Record Number: 6621
Author(s): Arcangeli, Tiziana.
Contributor(s):
Title : Re-reading a Mis-known and Mis-read Mystic: Angela da Foligno [The author argues that Angela used the language of the body to make her "voice" heard; even though Angela had to couch her revelations in a male subtext of Biblical references and filter her voice through a male scribe, her writings did survive].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 41 - 78. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

160. Record Number: 140
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Language and the Body in Thomas of Cantimpré's Life of Lutgard of Aywières
Source: Cistercian Studies Quarterly , 30., 4 ( 1995):  Pages 339 - 347.
Year of Publication: 1995.

161. Record Number: 6624
Author(s): Noffke, Suzanne, O. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Physical in the Mystical Writings of Catherine of Siena [The author argues that Catherine's physically vivid stories and images were intended to help her readers understand both God and human spirituality as incorporating and transcending the physical].
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 109 - 129. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

162. Record Number: 1765
Author(s): Semple, Benjamin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Male Psyche and the Female Sacred Body in Marie de France and Christine de Pizan
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 86 (1994): 164-186 Corps Mystique, Corps Sacré: Textual Transfigurations of the Body from the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

163. Record Number: 8476
Author(s): Kay, Sarah and Miri Rubin
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction [The editors do not summarize the contents of each essay published in the book but rather explore how the various historical and theoretical approaches to the body interact. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Quaderni Medievali , 39., (giugno 1995):  Pages 1 - 9.
Year of Publication: 1994.

164. Record Number: 8531
Author(s): Molleson, Theya.
Contributor(s):
Title : Can the Degree of Sexual Dimorphism Provide an Insight into the Position of Women in Past Populations?
Source: La Femme pendant le Moyen Âge et l'époque moderne. Actes des Sixiémes Journées Anthropologiques de Valbonne 9-10-11 juin 1992.   Edited by Luc Buchet Dossier de Documentation Archéologique, 17.   CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques) Éditions, 1994. Quaderni Medievali , 39., (giugno 1995):  Pages 51 - 67.
Year of Publication: 1994.

165. Record Number: 2725
Author(s): Stanbury, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Body and the City in "Pearl" [argues that the narrator's loss of his infant daughter is the central issue in the poem and that the visions of the maiden, the city, and the Lamb are informed by the dreamer's work of mourning and quest for consolation].
Source: Representations (Full Text via JSTOR) 48 (Fall 1994): 30-47. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

166. Record Number: 4389
Author(s): McGuire, Brian Patrick.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexual Awareness and Identity in Aelred of Rievaulx (1110-1167) [The author argues that Aelred had a strong attraction to other men and had a sex life prior to his entry into the monastery; as a monk Aelred enjoyed intense friendships but had renounced sexual relations].
Source: American Benedictine Review , 45., 2 (June 1994):  Pages 184 - 226.
Year of Publication: 1994.

167. Record Number: 5516
Author(s): Hollywood, Amy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Suffering Transformed: Marguerite Porete, Meister Eckhart, and the Problem of Women's Spirituality [the author argues that both Porete and Eckhart questioned the value of asceticism, mystical phenomena, and visionary experiences, all associated with women's spirituality; they favored instead a move toward detachment and sought to relieve religious women's suffering].
Source: Meister Eckhart and the Beguine Mystics: Hadewijch of Brabant, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Marguerite Porete.   Edited by Bernard McGinn .   Continuum, 1994. American Benedictine Review , 45., 2 (June 1994):  Pages 87 - 113.
Year of Publication: 1994.

168. Record Number: 8477
Author(s): Simons, Walter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading a Saint's Body: Rapture and Bodily Movement in the "vitae" of Thirteenth-century Beguines [The author concentrates on Elisabeth van Spalbeek but also briefly discusses Saint Lutgard, Juliana of Mont Cornillon, Ida of Louvain, Beatrice of Nazareth, and Marie d'Oignies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. American Benedictine Review , 45., 2 (June 1994):  Pages 10 - 23.
Year of Publication: 1994.

169. Record Number: 5518
Author(s): Woods, Richard, O. P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Conclusion: Women and Men in the Development of Late Medieval Mysticism [The author briefly considers some of the female mystics whose writings influenced Eckhart, including Hadewijch of Antwerp, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Marguerite Porete].
Source: Meister Eckhart and the Beguine Mystics: Hadewijch of Brabant, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Marguerite Porete.   Edited by Bernard McGinn .   Continuum, 1994. American Benedictine Review , 45., 2 (June 1994):  Pages 147 - 164.
Year of Publication: 1994.

170. Record Number: 2730
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Flesh and Flood: The Function of Female Asceticism in the Digby "Mary Magdalene"
Source: Philological Quarterly , 73., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 385 - 401.
Year of Publication: 1994.

171. Record Number: 1505
Author(s): Molina, Caroline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Illness as Privilege: Hildegard von Bingen and the Condition of Mystic Writing
Source: Women's Studies , 23., 1 ( 1994):  Pages 85 - 91.
Year of Publication: 1994.

172. Record Number: 1486
Author(s): Smith, Susan L.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Nude Judith from Padua and the Reception of Donatello's Bronze David [argues that the bronze statuette of Judith is modelled on Donatello's David and shares with it an ambiguous, eroticized vision of the usual heroic nude].
Source: Comitatus , 25., ( 1994):  Pages 59 - 80. [contributions are accepted from graduate students and those who have received their doctorate within the last three years]
Year of Publication: 1994.

173. Record Number: 8481
Author(s): Chinca, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Body in Some Middle High German "Mären": Taming and Maiming [The author examines a number of German "mären," falbiau-like stories, in which wives exert mastery over their husbands, sometimes injuring them in a humiliating fashion. The author argues that the stories are addressed to a male audience who consider women peripheral but are bothered by female involvement in what they consider to be male-only activities. The treatment of the body in the "mären" is a code to express men's centrality and women's place at the social margin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Comitatus , 25., ( 1994):  Pages 187 - 210.
Year of Publication: 1994.

174. Record Number: 8482
Author(s): Kay, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Body of Knowledge: Epistemology and Misogyny in the "Romance of the Rose" [The author situates Jean de Meun's epistemology and misogyny within the intellectual currents and direct literary sources of the "Roman de la Rose," including Boethius, Alan de Lille, and the neo-Aristotelians. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Comitatus , 25., ( 1994):  Pages 211 - 235.
Year of Publication: 1994.

175. Record Number: 1919
Author(s): Ricco, John Paul.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queering Boundaries: Semen and Visual Representations from the Middle Ages and in the Era of the AIDS Crisis [analysis of the sexuality expressed in a carved corbel that represents two men tugging on each other's beards; comparison with recent paintings by Ridgeway Bennett].
Source:   Edited by Whitney Davis Journal of Homosexuality , 27., 40180 ( 1994):  Pages 57 - 80. Published simultaneously in Gay and Lesbian Studies in Art History. Edited by Whitney Davis. Haworth Press, 1994. 57-80
Year of Publication: 1994.

176. Record Number: 8479
Author(s): Gilchrist, Roberta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Bodies in the Material World: Gender, Stigma, and the Body [ The author addresses two issues, one of which concerns the defining of the gendered female body through high status architecture. The author compares the spaces for women in castles with female monasteries. She finds segregation and enclosure in both with physical boundaries to control access. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Journal of Homosexuality , 27., 40180 ( 1994):  Pages 43 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1994.

177. Record Number: 3410
Author(s): McCracken, Peggy.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Boy Who Was a Girl: Reading Gender in the "Roman de Silence"
Source: Romanic Review , 85., 4 (November 1994):  Pages 517 - 536.
Year of Publication: 1994.

178. Record Number: 8478
Author(s): Wogan-Browne, Jocelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaste Bodies: Frames and Experiences [The author explores the "Ancrene Wisse," arguing that it embodies an ideology of containment for women in its emphasis on the enclosed, chaste body. At the same time there are slips since the manuscript shows glimpses of a textual community and even of anchoresses living together. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Romanic Review , 85., 4 (November 1994):  Pages 24 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1994.

179. Record Number: 2961
Author(s): Horner, Shari.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Truth and Sexual Violence: The Old English "Juliana," Anglo-Saxon Nuns, and the Discourse of Female Monastic Enclosure [analyzes the text in light of female monastic chastity and the threat of rape and violence].
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 19, 3 (Spring 1994): 658-675. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

180. Record Number: 6593
Author(s): Horner, Shari.
Contributor(s):
Title : En/closed Subjects: "The Wife's Lament" and the Culture of Early Medieval Female Monasticism [The author argues that "The Wife's Lament" should be read within the context of female monastic enclosure; the repeated gendered acts establish a feminine speaking self].
Source: Aestel , 2., ( 1994):  Pages 45 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1994.

181. Record Number: 8480
Author(s): Rubin, Miri.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Person in the Form: Medieval Challenges to Bodily "Order" [The author discusses a number of instances in which the order and hierarchy of the body were violated. In terms of gender issues, the author briefly considers hermaphrodites, Jews accused of performing abortions, and the doubts a peasant woman near Montaillou had about Christ's divinity because of her horror at the shameful filth that the Virgin Mary must have delivered in childbirth along with the infant Christ. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Framing Medieval Bodies.   Edited by Sarah Kay and Miri Rubin .   Manchester University Press, 1994. Aestel , 2., ( 1994):  Pages 100 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1994.

182. Record Number: 1764
Author(s): Brownlee, Kevin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mélusine's Hybrid Body and the Poetics of Metamorphosis [discussion of multiple aspects including the monstrous, the erotic, the courtly, the maternal, and the political].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 86 (1994): 18-38. Corps Mystique, Corps Sacré: Textual Transfigurations of the Body from the Middle Ages to the Seventeenth Century.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

183. Record Number: 5263
Author(s): Beckwith, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Passionate Regulation: Enclosure, Ascesis, and the Feminist Imaginary [The author examines the ways in which the body of the anchoress in the "Ancrene Wisse" is controlled through practices including confession, asceticism, regulation of the senses, and physical enactments of "imitatio Christi"].
Source: South Atlantic Quarterly , 93., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 803 - 824.
Year of Publication: 1994.

184. Record Number: 3556
Author(s): Kinney, Clare R.
Contributor(s):
Title : The (Dis) Embodied Hero and the Signs of Manhood in "Sir Gawain and the Green Knight"
Source: Medieval Masculinities: Regarding Men in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Clare A. Lees with the assistance of Thelma Fenster and Jo Ann McNamara Medieval Cultures, 7.   University of Minnesota Press, 1994. South Atlantic Quarterly , 93., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 47 - 57.
Year of Publication: 1994.

185. Record Number: 11205
Author(s): Leyser, Conrad.
Contributor(s):
Title : Long-haired Kings and Short-haired Nuns: Writing on the Body in Caesarius of Arles [The rule of the convent of St. John’s, founded by Bishop Caesarius of Arles in 512, specifies that the nuns have short hair. Futhermore, the nuns’ hair must be no longer than the specific length of a certain mark written in the regula manuscripts themselves. This hair length mandate may have arisen out of a desire to distinguish people in monastic orders from the kings in Germaic cultures, who commonly wore long hair. Rather than being a misogynist requirement derived from Scriptural passages on women’s appearance, this hair rule encourages a monastic identification between men and women and builds a tightly-knight community of religious women that resists outside social pressures. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Patristica , 24., ( 1993):  Pages 143 - 150. Papers presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 1991. Historica, Theologica et Philosophica, Gnostica
Year of Publication: 1993.

186. Record Number: 10287
Author(s): Johnson-Haddad, Miranda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Like the Moon It Renews Itself: the Female Body as Text in Dante, Ariosto, and Tasso [The author considers the representations of female bodies in three medieval and renaissance Italian poems. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Stanford Italian Review , 11., 40180 ( 1992):  Pages 203 - 215.
Year of Publication: 1992.

187. Record Number: 10672
Author(s): Park, Tarjei.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reflecting Christ: The Role of the Flesh in Walter Hilton and Julian of Norwich
Source: Medieval Mystical Tradition in England: Exeter Symposium , 5., ( 1992):  Pages 17 - 37.
Year of Publication: 1992.

188. Record Number: 11111
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Polycracy, Obligation, and Revolt: The Body Politic in John of Salisbury and Christine de Pizan
Source: Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Margaret Brabant .   Westview Press, 1992. Studia Patristica , 24., ( 1993):  Pages 33 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1992.

189. Record Number: 1514
Author(s): Sperberg-McQueen, M. R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Whose Body Is It? Chaste Strategies and the Reinforcement of Patriarchy in Three Plays by Hrotswitha von Gandersheim ["The Martyrdom of the Holy Virgins Agape, Chione, and Irena," "The Fall and Repentance of Mary, Niece of the Hermit Abraham," and "The Resurrection of Drusiana and of Callimachus"].
Source: Women in German Yearbook , 8., ( 1992):  Pages 47 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1992.

190. Record Number: 10519
Author(s): Thomasset, Claude.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Nature of Woman [The author provides an overview of medieval representations of women and sexuality through medical treatises (texts concerning female anatomy and physiology) and related writings by theologians and physicians. Galen’s theory that the female internal organs were the inverse of the male sexual organ was very influential, but writers developed diverse and contradictory opinions on the nature of female sex organs, the function of menstrual blood, and the process of determining the gender of a fetus during pregnancy. Writers also expressed anxiety about the ways women shared sexual knowledge with each other, how women derived pleasures from sex, and what caused various illnesses in women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Women in German Yearbook , 8., ( 1992):  Pages 43 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1992.

191. Record Number: 9527
Author(s): Banner, Lois.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Fashionable Sex, 1100-1600 [The bodies of young men were often eroticized in late medieval and early modern Europe. Men’s clothing emphasized parts of the body associated with male sexuality and power, with shoes emphasizing the feet, fitted tights and trousers highlighting the legs, and codpieces drawing attention to the genitals. Clothing also indicated social class; for instance, poulaines (long, slender shoes) were associated with aristocrats and broad, short shoes with peasants. Changes in warfare and in social attitudes influenced evolving male fashions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: History Today , 42., (April 1992):  Pages 37 - 44.
Year of Publication: 1992.

192. Record Number: 10756
Author(s): Allen, Valerie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blaunche on Top and Alisoun on Bottom [The author explores Chaucer's use of "descriptio" to characterize Blaunche and Alisoun. With Blaunche the physical characteristics confirm her virtuous moral qualities, while Alisoun's carnality givers her a certain autonomy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. History Today , 42., (April 1992):  Pages 23 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1992.

193. Record Number: 10734
Author(s): Bynum, Caroline Walker.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Body of Christ in the Later Middle Ages: A Reply to Leo Steinberg [The author argues against Steinberg’s notion that Renaissance painters focused on Christ’s penis in order to make a theological statement about sexuality; she suggests instead that fifteenth-century artists show Jesus as both male and female, and saw his as a generative body. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Human Body in Medieval Religion. Caroline Walker Bynum .   MIT Press, 1991. Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 79 - 118.
Year of Publication: 1991.

194. Record Number: 10737
Author(s): Bynum, Caroline Walker.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Female Body and Religious Practice in the Later Middle Ages [The essay analyzes the theological implications of women’s bodies in the later Middle Ages, arguing that female flesh, created and redeemed by God, was also a means to encounter Him spiritually. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Human Body in Medieval Religion. Caroline Walker Bynum .   MIT Press, 1991. Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 181 - 238.
Year of Publication: 1991.

195. Record Number: 10738
Author(s): Bynum, Caroline Walker.
Contributor(s):
Title : Material Continuity, Personal Survival and the Resurrection of the Body: A Scholastic Discussion in Its Medieval and Modern Contexts [The essay discusses the medieval scholastic debates about the doctrine of the resurrection of the body, and argues that the modern era sees material continuity as no less essential for personal survival. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fragmentation and Redemption: Essays on Gender and the Human Body in Medieval Religion. Caroline Walker Bynum .   MIT Press, 1991. Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 239 - 298.
Year of Publication: 1991.

196. Record Number: 10890
Author(s): Nichols, Ann Eljenholm.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Hierosphthitic Topos, or the Fate of Fergus: Notes on the N-Town Assumption [The "N-Town Assumption of Mary Play" contains a reference to the apocryphal story of Fergus, a Jew who interrupts the Virgin Mary’s funeral by attacking her bier as it is carried by the Apostles. In some versions of the story, Fergus is punished for his
Source: Comparative Drama , 25., 1 ( 1991):  Pages 29 - 41.
Year of Publication: 1991.

197. Record Number: 10978
Author(s): Cash, Annette Grant.
Contributor(s):
Title : “I desyrede a bodylye syght”: Julian of Norwich and the Body [The author argues that Julian’s bodily experience, described in her “Showings,” advances a theology of the body and of “sensualyte.” Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 17., 1 (March 1991):  Pages 12 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1991.

198. Record Number: 11065
Author(s): Huttar, Charles A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Arms and the Man: The Place of Beatrice in Charles Williams’ Romantic Theology [Williams adopts Dantean themes in his twentieth-century novels and Arthurian poetry. In many of his works, female characters inspire epiphanies just as Beatrice inspired Dante (in “Paradiso” and “Vita Nuova”). Williams’ numerous allusions to the arms (or bodies) of beautiful women invoke famous near-divine feminine figures from medieval literature like Isolde and Beatrice. In both the medieval and modern texts, the woman’s physical beauty is the vehicle for the male lover’s transcendent awareness and understanding of God. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Medievalism , 3., 3 (Winter 1991):  Pages 307 - 343.
Year of Publication: 1991.

199. Record Number: 11202
Author(s): Fite, Patricia P.
Contributor(s):
Title : To “Sytt and Syng of Luf Langyng”: The Feminine Dynamic of Richard Rolle’s Mysticism [Richard Rolle combines masculine and feminine dimensions of spirituality in his mystical writings. He uses feminized language as an alternative to the discourse of clerical authority, invoking the language of “luf langyng” (yearning for love) to express the mystical union of body and soul and the intense desire for union with the divine. Rolle’s concept of spiritual integration and affinity with the feminine anticipates the psychic theories of Carl Jung. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Mystica , 14., 40212 (Summer/Fall 1991):  Pages 13 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1991.

200. Record Number: 11819
Author(s): Cestaro, Gary P.
Contributor(s):
Title : ...quanquam Sarnum biberimus ante dentes...: The Primal Scene of Suckling in Dante's De vulgari eloquentia [In his treatise on language, Dante foregrounds suckling imagery and the importance of the maternal body. This maternal imagery stems from a long tradition of representing the allegorical figure of Grammatica (grammar) as a nurse. According to psychoanalytic theory, the assumed natural primacy of the vernacular as a mother tongue (a native language acquired before Latin) evokes a primal scene of union with the mother (a state that precedes linguistic communication in human development). Nonetheless, the rationalistic male grammarian perpetually struggles to obscure the feminine origins of speech in order to maintain strict gender boundaries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 119 - 147.
Year of Publication: 1991.

201. Record Number: 11772
Author(s): Jochens, Jenny.
Contributor(s):
Title : Before the Male Gaze: The Absence of the Female Body in Old Norse [The essay studies Old Norse descriptions of corporeal beauty, focusing in particular on the role of clothing and hair. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Sex in the Middle Ages: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Joyce E. Salisbury .   Garland Publishing, 1991. Dante Studies , 109., ( 1991):  Pages 3 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1991.

202. Record Number: 8943
Author(s): Santi, Francesco.
Contributor(s):
Title : Tre manuali di storia del corpo [Modern historiography of holy women restores the body to importance, but it risks eliminating the concept of the soul. Catherine of Siena, for one, sought to transform the body, regarded as the female aspect of life, into a body of glory. In this review article the author discusses Rudolph Bell's "Holy Anorexia," Caroline Bynum's "Holy Feast and Holy Fast," and Ginette Raimbault and Caroline Eliacheff's "Les Indomptables." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studi Medievali , 31., 2 (Dicembre 1990):  Pages 805 - 820.
Year of Publication: 1990.

203. Record Number: 11723
Author(s): Lichtmann, Maria R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Julian of Norwich and the Ontology of the Feminine [The author argues that Julian understands God through principles of the feminine. This includes the love and compassion of motherhood, the sensuality of the female body, and the safe enclosure of the womb. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Mystica , 13., 40212 ( 1990):  Pages 53 - 65.
Year of Publication: 1990.

204. Record Number: 12796
Author(s): Reineke, Martha J.
Contributor(s):
Title : This Is My Body: Reflections on Abjection, Anorexia, and Medieval Women Mystics [Drawing on the feminist theoretical work of thinkers like Julia Kristeva and Rene Girard, the author argues that women mystics' self-imposed starvation mirrors threats against the social body of late medieval Christendom, and reveals the fractures at the base of phallocentric European culture. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 58., 2 (Summer 1990):  Pages 245 - 265.
Year of Publication: 1990.

205. Record Number: 32506
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Melusine in her bath, spied upon by her husband Raymondin
Source: Studia Mystica , 13., 40212 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

206. Record Number: 32550
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Melusine flees after being discovered by her husband, but she returns to care for her infants
Source: Studia Mystica , 13., 40212 ( 1990):
Year of Publication:

207. Record Number: 39186
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Opening of Saint Hedwig's Tomb; The Translation of Saint Hedwig's Relics
Source: Studia Mystica , 13., 40212 ( 1990):
Year of Publication: