Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


7 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 9511
Author(s): Wiberg Pedersen, Else Marie
Contributor(s):
Title : Can God Speak in the Vernacular? On Beatrice of Nazareth's Flemish Exposition of the Love for God [The author examines the "Seven manieren van heiliger Minnen," a vernacular text written by Beatrice, a prioress of the Cistercian convent of Nazareth in present day Belgium near Antwerp. Wiberg Pedersen also looks at Beatrice's "vita," written in Latin by an unknown monk. The monk also translated her "Seven manieren" text into Latin for inclusion with the "vita." Wiberg Pedersen argues that the Church was frequently uncomfortable with women who wrote theological texts, particularly in the vernacular. Nevertheless Beatrice and other "mulieres religiosae" found various orthodox outlets for their writings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002.  Pages 185 - 208.
Year of Publication: 2002.

2. Record Number: 3549
Author(s): Hollywood, Amy.
Contributor(s):
Title : Inside Out: Beatrice of Nazareth and Her Hagiographer [The author compares a "vita" about Beatrice of Nazareth with her own writing "Seven Manners of Loving God" ; the author finds the texts quite different especially in Beatrice's exploration of the interplay between interiority and exteriority].
Source: Gendered Voices: Medieval Saints and Their Interpreters.   Edited by Catherine M. Mooney .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1999.  Pages 78 - 98.
Year of Publication: 1999.

3. Record Number: 4375
Author(s): Wiberg Pedersen, Else Marie
Contributor(s):
Title : The In-Carnation of Beatrice of Nazareth's Theology [The author compares the writing of Beatrice's hagiographer with her own texts; The hagiographer embodies her holiness in her illnesses and her bodily exercises while Beatirce makes God the focus of all her reflections].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Li├Ęge and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999.  Pages 61 - 79.
Year of Publication: 1999.

4. Record Number: 2917
Author(s): Schroeder, Joy A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Friendship in the "Vita" of Beatrice of Nazareth
Source: Magistra , 3., 2 (Winter 1997):  Pages 99 - 140.
Year of Publication: 1997.

5. Record Number: 2299
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : An Introduction to the "Vita Beatricis"
Source: Hidden Springs: Cistercian Monastic Women. Book One. Medieval Religious Women Volume Three.   Edited by John A. Nichols and Lillian Thomas Shank, O.S.C.O Cistercian Studies Series .   Cistercian Publications, 1995. Magistra , 3., 2 (Winter 1997):  Pages 345 - 359.
Year of Publication: 1995.

6. Record Number: 2300
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Love and Knowledge in "Seven Manners of Loving"
Source: Hidden Springs: Cistercian Monastic Women. Book One. Medieval Religious Women Volume Three.   Edited by John A. Nichols and Lillian Thomas Shank, O.S.C.O Cistercian Studies Series .   Cistercian Publications, 1995. Magistra , 3., 2 (Winter 1997):  Pages 361 - 376.
Year of Publication: 1995.

7. Record Number: 351
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Beatrice of Nazareth (c. 1200-1268): A Search for Her True Spirituality
Source: Vox Mystica: Essays on Medieval Mysticism in Honor of Professor Valerie M Lagorio.   Edited by Anne Clark Bartlett, Thomas H. Bestul, Janet Goebel, and William F. Pollard .   D.S. Brewer, 1995. Magistra , 3., 2 (Winter 1997):  Pages 57 - 74.
Year of Publication: 1995.