Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


1016 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 38263
Author(s): Troup, Cynthia
Contributor(s):
Title : 'With Open Doors' in the Tor de' Specchi: The Chiesa Vecchia Frescoes and the Monks of Santa Maria Nova
Source: Studies on Florence and the Italian Renaissance in Honour of F. W. Kent.   Edited by Peter Howard and Cecilia Hewlett .   Brepols , 2016.  Pages 405 - 427.
Year of Publication: 2016.

2. Record Number: 36088
Author(s): Ermine de Reims
Contributor(s):
Title : Appendix: The Visions of Ermine de Reims
Source: The Strange Case of Ermine de Reims: A Medieval Woman between Demons and Saints. Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 2015.  Pages 157 - 186.
Year of Publication: 2015.

3. Record Number: 35567
Author(s): , Pseudo-Bernard
Contributor(s): Mouron, Anne E., ed.
Title : A devoute tretes of holy Saynt Bernard, drawne oute of Latyn into English, callid The Manere of Good Lyvyng
Source: The Manere of Good Lyvyng: A Middle English Translation of Pseudo-Bernard's Liber de modo bene vivendi ad sororem.   Edited by Anne E. Mouron. Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts series .   Brepols, 2014.  Pages 41 - 182.
Year of Publication: 2014.

4. Record Number: 35786
Author(s): Innocent III, Pope
Contributor(s): Bolton, Brenda, trans.
Title : Innocent III and the Intercessory Processions of 1212
Source: Crusade and Christendom: Annotated Documents in Translation from Innocent III to the Fall of Acre, 1187-1291.   Edited by Jessalyn Bird, Edward Peters, and James M. Powell .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 2013.  Pages 82 - 85. The Latin text may be found in the Patrologia Latina, Volume 216: 698-699.
Year of Publication: 2013.

5. Record Number: 30402
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Miracles of the Holy (Proto)martyr Thekla
Source: Miracle Tales from Byzantium   Edited by Alice-Mary Talbot and Scott Fitzgerald Johnson. Dumbarton Oaks Medieval Library, 12.   Harvard University Press, 2012.  Pages 2 - 201.
Year of Publication: 2012.

6. Record Number: 29128
Author(s): Welch, Anna,
Contributor(s):
Title : Presence and Absence : Reading Clare of Assisi in Franciscan Liturgy and Community
Source: Gender, Catholicism and Spirituality: Women and the Roman Catholic Church in Britain and Europe, 1200-1900.   Edited by Laurence Lux-Sterritt and Carmen M. Mangion .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.  Pages 19 - 37.
Year of Publication: 2011.

7. Record Number: 29129
Author(s): Lahav, Rina,
Contributor(s):
Title : Marguerite Porete and the Predicament of her Preaching in Fourteenth-Century France
Source: Gender, Catholicism and Spirituality: Women and the Roman Catholic Church in Britain and Europe, 1200-1900.   Edited by Laurence Lux-Sterritt and Carmen M. Mangion .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2011.  Pages 38 - 50.
Year of Publication: 2011.

8. Record Number: 30980
Author(s): Walsh, Christine
Contributor(s):
Title : 'ERAT ABIGAIL MULIER PRUDENTISSIMA': Gilbert of Tournai and Attitudes to Female Sanctity in the Thirteenth Century
Source: Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 171 - 180. Special issue: Saints and Sanctity.
Year of Publication: 2011.

9. Record Number: 30981
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia
Contributor(s):
Title : Visualizing Stigmata: Stigmatic Saints and Crises of Representation in Late medieval and Early Modern Italy
Source: Studies in Church History , 47., ( 2011):  Pages 228 - 247. Special issue: Saints and Sanctity
Year of Publication: 2011.

10. Record Number: 27566
Author(s): Higley, Sarah
Contributor(s):
Title : Dressing up the Nuns: The “Lingua ignota” and Hildegard of Bingen’s Clothing [The author analyzes the words that Hildegard invented for women’s clothing in the “Lingua ignota.” The abbess placed an emphasis on hierarchy and order, marking the special status of virgins. Higley connects this to the crowns and floor-length veils worn by Hildegard’s nuns on feast days. The canoness Tenxwind wrote Hildegard complaining about this practice as immodest. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 93 - 109.
Year of Publication: 2010.

11. Record Number: 27618
Author(s): Farina, Lara
Contributor(s):
Title : Money, Books and Prayers: Anchoresses and Exchange in Thirteenth-century England [The author explores texts in the “Wooing Group,” analyzing the language of bargaining and exchange in the relationships the anchoress has both with Christ and her spiritual adviser. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women and Wealth in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Theresa Earenfight The New Middle Ages. .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 171 - 185.
Year of Publication: 2010.

12. Record Number: 27902
Author(s): Clare of Assisi
Contributor(s):
Title : Clare's "Forma vitae" [See also Joan Mueller's commentary on the "Forma vitae" in Chapter Seven, pages 209-257.]
Source: A Companion to Clare of Assisi: Life, Writings, and Spirituality. Joan Mueller. Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition, , 21. .   Brill, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 275 - 285.
Year of Publication: 2010.

13. Record Number: 29039
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth
Contributor(s):
Title : Julian of Norwich's Unmediated Vision [The author addresses a number of issues related to the visual including how Julian related the visual to theology, visual culture available in late fourteenth century Norwich, late medieval concepts of optics, and the importance to Julian of an unmediate
Source: Medieval and Early Modern Devotional Objects in Global Perspective: Translations of the Sacred.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Jennifer Jahner. New Middle Ages .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 97 - 114.
Year of Publication: 2010.

14. Record Number: 29622
Author(s): Cignoni, Arianna Pecorini
Contributor(s):
Title : Fondazioni francescane femminili nella Provincia Tusciae del XIII secolo [The Franciscan province of Tuscany was founded in 1217, and its first list of nuns' houses dates to 1228. This article gives information about twenty Franciscan women's monasteries in the province, few of which survive today. Most of these monasteries we
Source: Collectanea Franciscana , 80., 1-2 ( 2010):  Pages 181 - 206.
Year of Publication: 2010.

15. Record Number: 29907
Author(s): Berman, Constance Hoffman
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Medieval Women’s Property and Religious Benefactions in France: Eleanor of Vermandois and Blanche of Castile
Source: Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 151 - 182.
Year of Publication: 2010.

16. Record Number: 29909
Author(s): Ehrenschwendtner, Marie-Luise
Contributor(s):
Title : Creating the Sacred Space Within: Enclosure as a Defining Feature in the Convent Life of Medieval Dominican Sisters (13th–15th c.)
Source: Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 301 - 316.
Year of Publication: 2010.

17. Record Number: 24042
Author(s): Smith, Katherine Allen and Scott Wells
Contributor(s):
Title : Penelope D. Johnson, the Boswell Thesis, and "Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe" [The editors highlight the contributions made by Penelope Johnson to the understanding of women’s monasticism, gender history, and violence. John Boswell was her dissertation advisor, and they shared an interest in questions of religion and community. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 1 - 13.
Year of Publication: 2009.

18. Record Number: 24047
Author(s): Wells, Scott
Contributor(s):
Title : The Politics of Gender and Ethnicity in East Francia: The Case of Gandersheim, ca. 850-950 [The author argues that the women’s community at the monastery of Gandersheim was important because it conveyed multiple meanings for the Liudolfing-Saxon dynasty during a period of shifting familial and ethnic politics. During this time variations in royal support coincided with the monastery’s success or failure at articulating the ruling dynasty’s political identity. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 113 - 135.
Year of Publication: 2009.

19. Record Number: 24043
Author(s): Auslander, Diane Peters
Contributor(s):
Title : Living with a Saint: Monastic Identity, Community, and the Ideal of Asceticism in the Life of an Irish Saint [The author analyzes a ninth century “vita” of Saint Darerca, a conversion-era abbess who subjected herself to extremely harsh ascetic practices. Auslander concentrates on the ways in which the hagiographer reconciled the strains of the solitary and the communal within Irish monastic life. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 17 - 32.
Year of Publication: 2009.

20. Record Number: 28349
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Gallagher, Eric James, translator
Title : The prioress of Campsey [Ash] presented herself… [Item 903 from the hundred of Blything concerns the women’s monastery of Campsey in Suffolk. The prioress entered a plea asking that William the Fleming discharge her from services and customs on the tenement she held from him. The services were demanded by the earl of Norfolk. For other cases involving the priory of Campsey see items 557 and 932. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Civil Pleas of the Suffolk Eyre of 1240.   Edited by Eric James Gallagher Suffolk Records Society, 52.   Boydell Press , 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 188 - 188.
Year of Publication: 2009.

21. Record Number: 31270
Author(s): Leander, Archbishop of Seville, Saint
Contributor(s): Martyn, John R. C., trans.
Title : On the Teaching of Nuns and Contempt for the Other World
Source: A Book on the Teaching of Nuns and a Homily in Praise of the Church. Leander, Archbishop of Sevilla   Edited by John R. C. Martyn .   Lexington Books, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 62 - 132.
Year of Publication: 2009.

22. Record Number: 24045
Author(s): Schuchman, Anne M.
Contributor(s):
Title : "Within the Walls of Paradise": Space and Community in the "Vita" of Umiliana de' Cerchi [Umiliata dei Cerchi was a 13th century Florentine laywoman who, as a widow, lived a religious life in her family’s tower house. Franciscan friar Vito da Cortona wrote her “vita” shortly after her death in 1246. Schuchman focuses on the text's description of Umiliata’s life in the tower as a substitute for joining a monastery. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 49 - 64.
Year of Publication: 2009.

23. Record Number: 24049
Author(s): Valentine, Susan,
Contributor(s):
Title : Inseparable Companions: Mary Magdalene, Abelard, and Heloise [The author analyzes both Abelard’s and Heloise’s ideas about Mary Magdalene. Rather than concentrating on her sinful life, Abelard emphasized her devotion to Christ and her role of apostle to the apostles in first bringing news of the Resurrection. The strong presence of the Magdalene in the Paraclete liturgy and Heloise’s questioning about her in the “Problemata” help to indicate Heloise’s concern to emulate the Magdalene’s loving devotion perhaps not only for Christ but for Abelard as well. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 151 - 171.
Year of Publication: 2009.

24. Record Number: 24044
Author(s): Roukis-Stern, Christina,
Contributor(s):
Title : A Tale of Two Dioceses: Prologues as Letters in the "Vitae" Authored by Jacques de Vitry and Thomas de Cantimpré [The author analyzes the prefaces of five “vitae” (the life of Marie d’Oignies by Jacques and the other four (a supplement to the life of Marie d’Oignies, Christina Mirabilis , Marguerite d’Ypres, and Lutgard ) written by Thomas) looking particularly at the network of relationships the hagiographers had with holy women and with other clerics. Jacques dedicated his “vita” to Bishop Fulk of Toulouse but emphasized the superiority of Liège and its holy women over the arid and heretical diocese of Toulouse. Roukis-Stern observes in Thomas a number of anxieties and a particular need for close friendships. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 33 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2009.

25. Record Number: 24048
Author(s): Berman, Constance Hoffman
Contributor(s):
Title : Noble Women's Power as Reflected in the Foundations of Cistercian Houses for Nuns in Thirteenth-Century Northern France: Port-Royal, les Clairets, Moncey, Lieu and Eau-lez-Chartres [The author examines five Cistercian female houses supported by Matilda of Brunswick, the Countess of the Perche; Matilda of Garlande, Lady of Marly; and Isabelle, Countess of Chartres with the help of her daughter, Matilda of Amboise. Berman argues that these actions reveal the power and authority women exercised and need to be incorporated into the historical narrative. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 137 - 149.
Year of Publication: 2009.

26. Record Number: 24046
Author(s): Schulenburg, Jane Tibbetts
Contributor(s):
Title : Holy Women and the Needle Arts: Piety, Devotion, and Stitching the Sacred, ca. 500- 1150 [The author catalogs evidence of women’s embroidery for the Church done by queens, noble women, and nuns. They decorated Church vestments with gold, silver, and jewels. Schulenburg argues that their skills were values and associated with wisdom. Many of the embroiderers and patrons hoped for the special prayers of saints in return for their shining gifts. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 83 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2009.

27. Record Number: 24107
Author(s): Casto, Oronzo
Contributor(s):
Title : Processo e canonizzazione di sant'Elisabetta d'Ungheria secondo i documenti ufficiali [On May 27, 1235, Elizabeth of Hungary was canonized by Pope Gregory IX. The process of canonization was unusually quick, with reports of miracles, personal testimonies to Elizabeth’s virtues, and political pressure as factors. The article includes Italian translations of documents from the process of canonization, including Gregory IX’s bull enrolling Elizabeth among the recognized saints. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Collectanea Franciscana , 78., 1-2 ( 2008):  Pages 213 - 260.
Year of Publication: 2008.

28. Record Number: 24109
Author(s): Lisciotto, Donatella
Contributor(s):
Title : L'origine del monasterio di Montevergine in Messina [Eustochia Calafetto left a monastery of Poor Clares to found one that followed the strictest version of the order’s life. Many of her nuns came from important families, and their increasing numbers required expansion of the original monastery. The monastery benefited from Eustochia’s reputation for sanctity, but eventually it became less rigorous in the observances that she had promoted. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Collectanea Franciscana , 78., 1-2 ( 2008):  Pages 685 - 700.
Year of Publication: 2008.

29. Record Number: 28929
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Life of St. Zita of Lucca [Available online in Kenneth Baxter Wolf's series, Texts in Translation. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: http://sites.google.com/site/canilup/lifeofzita
Year of Publication: 2008.

30. Record Number: 19088
Author(s): Goldfrank, David M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sisterhood Just Might be Powerful: The Testament-Rule of Elena Devochkina [A testament-rule survives for the women’s monastery of Novodevichi in Moscow. It was written by the monastery’s superior, Elena Devochkina, around the middle of the sixteenth century. Goldfrank argues that Devochkina’s rule for her nuns is unusual in the emphasis she places on their role in praying to ensure new heirs for Ivan IV and his younger brother. The article concludes with an English language translation of the testament-rule. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Russian History , 34., 40182 (Spring-Summer-Fall-Winter 2007):  Pages 189 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2007.

31. Record Number: 18397
Author(s): Twomey, Lesley K
Contributor(s):
Title : Poverty and Richly Decorated Garments: A Re-Evaluation of Their Significance in the "Vita Christi" of Isabel de Villena
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 3., ( 2007):  Pages 119 - 134.
Year of Publication: 2007.

32. Record Number: 20336
Author(s): Bertini Malgiarini, Patrizia and Ugo Vignuzzi
Contributor(s):
Title : Matilde a Helfta, Melchiade in Umbria (e oltre): un antico volgarizzamento umbro del "Liber specialis gratiae" [Mechthild von Hackeborn's "Liber specialis gratiae" was translated into Italian in the 15th or 16th century. It probably was made for nuns. The translation renames Mechthild "Melchiadis," as do other non-German versions. The appendix provides a compariso
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Russian History , 34., 40182 (Spring-Summer-Fall-Winter 2007):  Pages 291 - 307.
Year of Publication: 2006.

33. Record Number: 15887
Author(s): Anderson, Wendy Love.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Real Presence of Mary: Eucharistic Disbelief and the Limits of Orthodoxy in Fourteenth-Century France [The author analyses the case of Aude Fauré which was recorded in Bishop Jacques Fourniers' inquisitorial "Register." She gave two different accounts of her "error" in belief with the second version accepted by the tribunal and penances assigned. Anderson argues that Aude demonstrates a deeper theological understanding and a more complex spirituality than earlier scholars have recognized. Title notes upplied by Feminae.].
Source: Church History , 75., 4 (December 2006):  Pages 748 - 767.
Year of Publication: 2006.

34. Record Number: 17746
Author(s): Leonardi, Claudio
Contributor(s):
Title : Agata e il potere [Agatha of Catania was martyred in the third century. Her death was recorded in saints' lives, where it was presented as an imitation of Christ. Agatha's "Legenda" recounted her interrogations by the Roman magistrate and conveyed a sense of her femininity. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 1 - 10.
Year of Publication: 2006.

35. Record Number: 20330
Author(s): Pozzi, Giovanni
Contributor(s):
Title : Il linguaggio della scrittura mistica: Santa Caterina [Medieval mystics tried expressing their experiences in various forms, including autobiography, narrative, and metaphysical discourse. Women mystics frequently employed autobiography, a diary or personal letters. Catherine of Siena dictated prayers, lette
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 3 - 18.
Year of Publication: 2006.

36. Record Number: 20331
Author(s): Librandi, Rita
Contributor(s):
Title : Dal lessico della "Lettere" di Santa Caterina da Siena: La concretezza della fusione [Catherine of Siena used prophetic language in her letters. Although we lack a critical edition, the vocabulary of the letters can be studied for its use of metaphor. Her emphasis on images of spiritual feeding contrasts vividly with her extreme fasting i
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 19 - 40.
Year of Publication: 2006.

37. Record Number: 20332
Author(s): Santi, Francesco
Contributor(s):
Title : La scrittura nella scrittura di Caterina da Siena [The later Middle Ages saw an abandonment of confidence in language by intellectuals, with a related decline in exegesis of the Bible. Catherine of Siena used passages from the Bible, but she frequently used only a single phrase instead of full quotations
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 41 - 69.
Year of Publication: 2006.

38. Record Number: 20333
Author(s): Leonardi, Lino
Contributor(s):
Title : Il problema testuale dell'epistolario Cateriniano [Catherine of Siena dictated her letters, and her oral language is reflected in the surviving texts. Modern editions too easily iron out the evidence of orality. The surviving manuscript traditions reflect the work of different secretaries and hagiographe
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 71 - 90.
Year of Publication: 2006.

39. Record Number: 20334
Author(s): Frosini, Giovanna
Contributor(s):
Title : Lingua e testo nel manoscritto Viennese delle letter di Caterina [Each collection of the letters of Catherine of Siena bears witness not just to the saint but to her secretaries and the compilers of individual manuscripts. The Vienna MS [ONB 3514] derives from the monastery of Monte Oliveto Maggiore. It brings together
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 91 - 125.
Year of Publication: 2006.

40. Record Number: 20335
Author(s): Zaggia, Masimo
Contributor(s):
Title : Varia fortuna editoriale delle lettere di Caterina da Siena [In the 16th century, the diffusion of the letters of Catherine of Siena in print derived from Venice. The texts were secured from Venetian Dominican houses. Only in the 18th century did the printing of Catherine's works pass to Tuscany and Rome. Older pr
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 127 - 187.
Year of Publication: 2006.

41. Record Number: 20337
Author(s): Trifone, Pietro
Contributor(s):
Title : Gli ingegnosi caprici di un linguaiolo: appunti sul "Vocabolario cateriniano" di Girolamo Gigli [Girolamo Gigli (d. 1722) composed his "Vocabolario cateriniano" as a part of a campaign against the Florentine domination of accepted Italian style. Gigli used passages from the saint's writings to illustrate local Sienese usages he wished to defend. The
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 189 - 203.
Year of Publication: 2006.

42. Record Number: 20338
Author(s): Bartolomei Romangoli, Alessandra
Contributor(s):
Title : Il linguaggio del corpo in Santa Caterina da Siena [Raymond of Capua described Catherine of Siena's body as transformed from a natural entity to one expressing Christ's own body. This was achieved by extreme mortification of the flesh, especially by giving up food. Catherine used bodily metaphors in her w
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 205 - 229.
Year of Publication: 2006.

43. Record Number: 20339
Author(s): Ricci, Alessio
Contributor(s):
Title : Recorsivita e semplicita delle "visioni" di Francesca Romana: su alcuni aspetti sintattici e testuali del discorso mistico [The Latin translation of Giovanni Mattioti's collection of evidence for the sanctity of Frances of Rome leaves out the flavor of the Italian original. The iconography of Frances' visions is described, but some of her less tactful remarks also are exclude
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 13., ( 2006):  Pages 231 - 255.
Year of Publication: 2006.

44. Record Number: 20621
Author(s): Turco, Iole
Contributor(s):
Title : Cristina di Markyate e la "mistica femminile" [Twelfth-century intellectuals doubted women's spiritual capacities, but the same period saw many women mystics gain recognition for their experience of God. Christina of Markyate was a visionary with her earliest visions tied to the defense of her virginity. Some are concerned with Christina's mystical marriage to Christ. Her experiences transcended the limits of the intellect through love. Title note supplies by Feminae.]
Source: Schede medievali , 44., ( 2006):  Pages 127 - 147.
Year of Publication: 2006.

45. Record Number: 15840
Author(s): Weddle, Saundra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Identity and Alliance: Urban Presence, Spatial Privilege, and Florentine Renaissance Convents [The author analyses the locations and functions of women's monasteries in late medieval and early modern Florence. Weddle argues that architectural spaces carried multiple meanings. Womens' monasteries were places of spiritual work, but they also could convey meanings related to patronage and politics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006. Russian History , 34., 40182 (Spring-Summer-Fall-Winter 2007):  Pages 394 - 412.
Year of Publication: 2006.

46. Record Number: 11759
Author(s): Hayum, Andrée
Contributor(s):
Title : A Renaissance Audience Considered: The Nuns at S. Apollonia and Castagno's "Last Supper" [The author explores the possible meanings of the Castagno fresco for the nuns who commissioned the work for their refectory in the monastery of Santa Apollonia in Florence. Hayum notes Castagno's dramatic effects in the scale of figures and the spatial illusion. This kind of immediacy fits with the numerous decoration in the monastery representing nuns recieving blessings from Saint Apollonia and praying before Christ on the crucifix. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Art Bulletin , 88., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 243 - 266.
Year of Publication: 2006.

47. Record Number: 19229
Author(s): Bueno, Irene
Contributor(s):
Title : Preferire l'eresia? Donne catare in Linguadoca nel primo Trecento [The histography of women Cathars usually focuses on the twelfth and thirteenth centuries, not on their declining numbers in the early fourteenth century. Evidence from Montaillou shows Cathar teachings transmitted within families. The women who converted often ignored misogynistic tenets of Catharism in favor of elements like belief that dead babies would experience reincarnation. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Storia delle donne 2 (2006): 243-266.
Year of Publication: 2006.

48. Record Number: 14776
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : An Analysis of Power in the Writing of Mechtild of Magdeburg
Source: Feminist Theology , 14., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 189 - 204.
Year of Publication: 2006.

49. Record Number: 16303
Author(s): Niles, John D
Contributor(s):
Title : Why the Bishop of Florence Had to Get Married [The author analyzes the "adventus" ceremony in Florence when a new bishop took possession of his see. The ceremony included a ritual marriage with the abbess of San Pier Maggiore monastery. Miller argues that the bishop's outsider status and role as head of a lineage needed the connection with a highly placed abbess to symbolize his alliance with the city's most important political families. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 1055 - 1091.
Year of Publication: 2006.

50. Record Number: 20730
Author(s): Mecham, June L
Contributor(s):
Title : Breaking Old Habits: Recent Research on Women, Spirituality, and the Arts in the Middle Ages
Source: History Compass , 4., 3 ( 2006):  Pages 448 - 480.
Year of Publication: 2006.

51. Record Number: 13657
Author(s): Hutchison, Ann M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Approaching Medieval Women Mystics in the Twenty-First Century [The author briefly explores themes of interest to students including gender issues, manuscripts and textual transmission, and connections among the women mystics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Approaching Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical Texts. Christianity and Culture: Issues in Teaching and Research Series, Volume 2.   Edited by Dee Dyas, Valerie Edden, and Roger Ellis .   D. S. Brewer, 2005.  Pages 175 - 183.
Year of Publication: 2005.

52. Record Number: 11752
Author(s): Stanbury, Sarah and Virginia Chieffo Raguin
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction [The authors briefly discuss ideas involved with women and their relations to the physical spaces of churches. They introduce theorists who have had an influence in this area including Pierre Bourdieu. They discuss the case of the squint, a hole in the screen around the chancel allowing a view of the altar, in terms of women's use and the subjective experience of peeping into a privileged space. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. Schede medievali , 44., ( 2006):  Pages 1 - 21.
Year of Publication: 2005.

53. Record Number: 11454
Author(s): Carroll-Clark, Susan M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bad Habits: Clothing and Textile References in the Register of Eudes Rigaud, Archbishop of Rouen [Eudes Rigaud paid inspection visits to all the religious groups in his archbishopric including women's monasteries. In his register nuns were frequently reprimanded for wearing luxury furs, metal belts, and secular clothes. They were also faulted for doing fine needlework as gifts for friends or as items for sale. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval clothing and textiles. Vol. 1.   Edited by Robin Netherton and Gale R Owen-Crocker .   Boydell Press, 2005.  Pages 81 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2005.

54. Record Number: 12854
Author(s): Ellis, Roger.
Contributor(s):
Title : Text and Controversy: In Defense of St. Birgitta of Sweden [Early writers in defense of Bridget of Sweden had her canonization in mind. They answered critics and sought official approbation from Bridget's life, order and texts. Miracles and conversions were cited to prove that God chose to work through a woman. They also presented Bridget as an honorary man, stronger than her sex. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Text and Controversy from Wyclif to Bale: Essays in Honour of Anne Hudson.   Edited by Helen Barr and Ann M. Hutchison. Medieval Church Studies Series, 4 .   Brepols, 2005.  Pages 303 - 321.
Year of Publication: 2005.

55. Record Number: 13658
Author(s): Glasscoe, Marion.
Contributor(s):
Title : Contexts for Teaching Julian of Norwich [The author identifies difficulties which Julian poses for students who have no knowledge of the Middle Ages. Glasscoe identifies passages and themes, including the Trinity and the authority conveyed by visions, that work well with beginning students. She also identifies some related texts including the Middle English version of "Stabat Mater" that explore themes similar to those of Julian's texts. The Appendix presents "Stond wel moder, under rode," a portion of the Middle English "Stabat Mater." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Approaching Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical Texts. Christianity and Culture: Issues in Teaching and Research Series, Volume 2.   Edited by Dee Dyas, Valerie Edden, and Roger Ellis .   D. S. Brewer, 2005.  Pages 185 - 199.
Year of Publication: 2005.

56. Record Number: 14646
Author(s): Brolis, Maria Teresa.
Contributor(s):
Title : Un monastero assalito dagli uomini, ignorato dagli storici e ricostruito dalla monache: Santa Maria di Valmarina presso Bergamo (secoli XII-XV) [The twelfth century saw contemporaneous development of monastic and civic institutions in Bergamo and its vicinity. Santa Maria di Valmarina was founded outside Bergamo in the twelfth century as a monastery for nuns. It was patronized by the city's elite, but it suffered in the upheavals of the fourteenth century. Finally, the nuns were forced to relocate inside the city. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chiesa, vita religiosa, societa nel Medioevo italiano: Studi offerti a Giuseppina De Sandre Gasparini.   Edited by Mariaclara Rossi and Gian Maria Varanini .   Herder, 2005.  Pages 121 - 137.
Year of Publication: 2005.

57. Record Number: 14650
Author(s): Sorelli, Fernanda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Vita religiosa delle donne nel medioevo veneziano: indicazioni delle fonti dei secoli XII-XIV [Venetian archives are rich in documents touching on the lives of medieval women, lay and religious. These include evidence of the Republic's intervention in the lives of women's monasteries. Support of these foundations was combined with efforts to correct lapses in discipline and bad morals. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chiesa, vita religiosa, societa nel Medioevo italiano: Studi offerti a Giuseppina De Sandre Gasparini.   Edited by Mariaclara Rossi and Gian Maria Varanini .   Herder, 2005.  Pages 613 - 630.
Year of Publication: 2005.

58. Record Number: 20149
Author(s): Troup, Cynthia
Contributor(s):
Title : Art History and the Resistant Presence of a Saint - The chiesa vecchia Frescoes at Rome's Tor de' Specchi [Attilio Rossi was the first art historian to write in depth about the fresco cycle at Tore de' Specchi illustrating the life of Frances of Rome. These images were painted c. 1468 by Antoniazzo Romano or artists associated with him for the Oblates of Santa Francesca Romana. Rossi treated the images in rhetorical terms as illustrating the triumph of the saint through the depiction of the saint's life. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Rituals, Images, and Words: Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by F. W. Kent and Charles Zika Late Medieval Early Modern Studies .   Brepols, 2005.  Pages 119 - 145.
Year of Publication: 2005.

59. Record Number: 11755
Author(s): Stanbury, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe and the Arts of Self-Patronage [The author argues that Margery Kempe frequently presents herself in her book as a patron and donor to the church. Stanbury compares this to surviving devotional art with donor portraits to suggest the imagery and social recognition Kempe may have had in mind. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. Schede medievali , 44., ( 2006):  Pages 75 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2005.

60. Record Number: 28214
Author(s): Newman, Barbara
Contributor(s):
Title : What Did It Mean to Say "I Saw"? The Clash between Theory and Practice in Medieval Visionary Culture [The author analyzes differing approaches to visions within the medieval Church. One view encouraged visions through guided meditation, with Newman citing Christina of Markyate and Mechthild of Hackeborn as examples. The other predominant view rejected visualization and questioned the source of visions. During the later Middle Ages theologians became increasingly concerned about the danger of cultivated visions, especially those of women like Bridget of Sweden and other lay people influenced by the pseudo-Bonaventuran "Meditations on the Life of Christ." Ultimately the more critical approach to visions prevailed among the learned. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Speculum , 80., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 1 - 43.
Year of Publication: 2005.

61. Record Number: 13655
Author(s): Windeatt, Barry.
Contributor(s):
Title : I Use but Comownycacyon and Good Wordys: Teaching and "The Book of Margery Kempe" [The author argues that scholars have tended to discount Kempe's inner life. Windeatt draws attention to her as a contemplative, praising the prayers throughout her book. Furthermore her conversations with Jesus Christ, Mary, and other holy figures offer important teachings for Margery and her readers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Approaching Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical Texts. Christianity and Culture: Issues in Teaching and Research Series, Volume 2.   Edited by Dee Dyas, Valerie Edden, and Roger Ellis .   D. S. Brewer, 2005. Schede medievali , 44., ( 2006):  Pages 115 - 128.
Year of Publication: 2005.

62. Record Number: 14569
Author(s): Powell, Morgan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Making the Psalter of Christina of Markyate (The St. Albans Psalter)
Source: Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 293 - 335.
Year of Publication: 2005.

63. Record Number: 33538
Author(s): Pearson, Andrea G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gendered Subject, Gendered Spectator: Mary Magdalen in the Gaze of Margaret of York
Source: Gesta , 44., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 47 - 66.
Year of Publication: 2005.

64. Record Number: 14137
Author(s): Elliott, Dyan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lollardy and the Integrity of Marriage and the Family [The author argues that Lollardy saw women's roles in the orthodox church as open to exploitation by the clergy. Lollardy targeted such abuse as friars taking advantage of women both for sex and for alms, as well as for priests becoming too familiar with
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 37 - 54.
Year of Publication: 2005.

65. Record Number: 15803
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Gerson on Lay Devotion [Jean Gerson had a double view of excesses in religion. On the one hand, he took a tolerant view of the well-meaning excesses of lay people, believing they could be led to right practices. On the other, he feared those who arrogated to themselves unique insights despite their lack of training. This stricture applied both to women and to men like Jacques of Bingen. Gerson was capable of changing his mind, as when he withdrew support of Ermine of Reims. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source:   Edited by Brian Patrick McGuire Brill's Companions to the Christian Tradition: A Series of handbooks and reference works on the intellectual and religious life of Europe, 500-1700, .   Brill, 2005. Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 131 - 145.
Year of Publication: 2005.

66. Record Number: 14145
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Tecla Servent and Her Two Husbands [The author analyzes the case of Tecla Servent, a fifteenth century Spanish visionary, who was mistreated by her husband. In her visions, however, Tecla has a rich and rewarding relationship with Christ who takes her as his wife. Difficulties with her ear
Source: The Medieval Marriage Scene: Prudence, Passion, Policy.   Edited by Sherry Roush and Cristelle L. Baskins .   Arizona Center for Medieval and Renaissance Studies, 2005. Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 187 - 200.
Year of Publication: 2005.

67. Record Number: 20781
Author(s): Kovacs, Lenke
Contributor(s):
Title : The Staging of the "Ludus de assumptione beatae Mariae virginis" (cod. 960, University Library, Innsbruck) [Describes the variations of stage settings and performance venues used for Assumption plays, emphasizing how practical concerns (such as needing to silence the audience) were incorporated into play scripts. Examines the relationship between the Virgin Mary and the Bride in the Song of Songs, and the depiction of Jews and Jerusalem. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 25 - 34.
Year of Publication: 2005.

68. Record Number: 14126
Author(s): Rudy, Kathryn M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women's Devotions at Court [The author briefly surveys the devotional activities of Margaret of York and her step-grandaughter Margaret of Austria. These included prayers and sacred objects related to fertility and childbirth, books for prayer, meditation, and teaching young childr
Source: Women of Distinction: Margaret of York | Margaret of Austria.   Edited by Dagmar Eichberger .   Brepols, 2005. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 230 - 239.
Year of Publication: 2005.

69. Record Number: 13679
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Representation, Imitation, Rejection: Chiara of Montefalco (d. 1308) and the Passion of Christ [The author briefly explores the visual references, especially for the passion of Christ, that were commonly known. These references helped shape people's understanding of holy women. When Clare of Montefalco died her fellow nuns expected to find evidence of her devotion to Christ in her heart. When it was cut open they found a cross and instruments of the passion. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies on Medieval and Early Modern Women 4: Victims or Viragos?   Edited by Christine Meek and Catherine Lawless .   Four Courts Press, 2005. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 89 - 101.
Year of Publication: 2005.

70. Record Number: 14606
Author(s): Raine, Melissa.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fals flesch: Food and the Embodied Piety of Margery Kempe [In examining Margery Kempe's various interactions with food which include feeding the poor, fasting, receiving the Eucharist, and eating at the tables of prominent people, Raine does not find gender a highly significant factor. Rather Margery acts out of highly individualized motivations including a concern to establish and enhance her own standing. In her conclusion Raine questions Caroline Walker Bynum's approach to women and food in Holy Feast and Holy Fast, finding the methodology and assumptions inadequate for the historical realities of gendered expectations and devotional practices. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: New Medieval Literatures , 7., ( 2005):  Pages 101 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2005.

71. Record Number: 11754
Author(s): Blanton, Virginia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ely's St. Æthelthryth: The Shrine's Enclosure of the Female Body as Symbol for the Inviolability of Monastic Space [The author argues that the monks at Ely used hagiographies and historical accounts to present the saint and her monastery in as strong a position as possible. The monks identify with the holy female body, emphasizing that as Æthelthryth's body is intact so the lands and properties of the monastery must not be violently seized. After the Norman conquest, William sent Norman monks to Ely. They, however, also wanted to defend the house's privileges, and the writings took on a new image for the saint. She is a warrior woman (a virago or virile woman) who confronts those wrongly holding the monastery's properties. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Space: Patronage, Place, and Gender in the Medieval Church.   Edited by Virginia Chieffo Raguin and Sarah Stanbury .   State University of New York Press, 2005. New Medieval Literatures , 7., ( 2005):  Pages 47 - 73.
Year of Publication: 2005.

72. Record Number: 13656
Author(s): Barratt, Alexandra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Teaching Anchoritic Texts: The Shock of the Old [The author discusses texts written for anchoresses, various available editions, and their uses in the classroom. The appendix presents an edited extract in Middle English from "The Rule of a Recluse," the late medieval version of Aelred's letter to his sister, "De Institutione Inclusarum." Following the letter, there is a gloss translating the more difficult words in the Middle English text. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Approaching Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical Texts. Christianity and Culture: Issues in Teaching and Research Series, Volume 2.   Edited by Dee Dyas, Valerie Edden, and Roger Ellis .   D. S. Brewer, 2005. New Medieval Literatures , 7., ( 2005):  Pages 131 - 143.
Year of Publication: 2005.

73. Record Number: 13654
Author(s): McAvoy, Liz Herbert.
Contributor(s):
Title : And Thou, to Whom This Booke Shall Come: Julian of Norwich and her Audience, Past, Present and Future [The author briefly explores dominant themes in Julian's thinking including both Jesus Christ and God as mother, the tripartite nature of the Trinity, the mercantile ethic of salvation, and the use of womb imagery to suggest both security and fertility. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Approaching Medieval English Anchoritic and Mystical Texts. Christianity and Culture: Issues in Teaching and Research Series, Volume 2.   Edited by Dee Dyas, Valerie Edden, and Roger Ellis .   D. S. Brewer, 2005. New Medieval Literatures , 7., ( 2005):  Pages 101 - 113.
Year of Publication: 2005.

74. Record Number: 19231
Author(s): Keller, Hildegard Elisabeth
Contributor(s):
Title : Segreti. Uno studio semantico sulla mistica femminile medievale [Medieval mystics frequently wrote about hidden or secret realities. Didactic texts tried to teach an approach to these secrets, while autobiographies presented mysteries that the mystic had experienced. Female mystics, as well as some men, frequently presented their experience in erotic terms derived from the Bible and including terms for pregnancy and birth. Many of them said they were compelled to reveal secrets they had learned. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Storia delle donne 1 (2005): 201-220.
Year of Publication: 2005.

75. Record Number: 10540
Author(s): Fassler, Margot.
Contributor(s):
Title : Music For the Love Feast: Hildegard of Bingen and the "Song of Songs" [The author focuses on two scriptural themes: the love feast of the "Song of Songs" and the song of the Lamb's high court from the "Book of Revelations." Fassler traces these themes in Hildegard's songs for St. Ursula and in her musical play, the "Ordo virtutum." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's Voices across Musical Worlds.   Edited by Jane A. Bernstein .   Northeastern University Press, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 92 - 117.
Year of Publication: 2004.

76. Record Number: 10572
Author(s): Alberzoni, Maria Pia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Da Pauperes Domine a Sorores Pauperes: la negazione di un modello di santita itinerante femminile? [In 1263 Pope Urban IV attempted to bring unity to the Poor Clares, imposing norms of monastic enclosure that limited the ideal of Franciscan poverty. Clare's own letters reveal her past struggles with Cardinal Ugolino (Gregory IX) for preservation of the ideal of strict poverty and mendicancy. Urban's bull also required that the Franciscan friars limit their care of women religious to the Clares. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Pellegrinaggi e culto dei Santi: Santita minoritica del primo e secundo ordine.   Edited by Benedetto Vetere .   Mario Congedo editore, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 39 - 59.
Year of Publication: 2004.

77. Record Number: 10822
Author(s): Góngora, María Eugenia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminea Forma and "Virga": Two Images of Incarnation in Hildegard of Bingen's "Symophonia"
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 2004.

78. Record Number: 10823
Author(s): Flisfisch, María Isabel.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Eve-Mary Dichotomy in the "Symphonia" of Hildegard of Bingen
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 37 - 46.
Year of Publication: 2004.

79. Record Number: 10824
Author(s): Meli, Beatriz.
Contributor(s):
Title : Virginitas and "Auctoritas": Two Threads in the Fabric of Hildegard of Bingen's "Symphonia armonie celestium revelationum"
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 47 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2004.

80. Record Number: 10825
Author(s): Fraeters, Veerle.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Genre: The Design of Hadewijch's "Book of Visions" [The author analyzes the structure of Hadewijch's individual visions as well as the overall structure of her "Book of Visions." The article concludes with three appendices: Patterns and thematic contents in the fourteen visions, Case study of narrative structures for the visions, and Hadewijch's visions outlined in terms of Richard of St. Victor's scheme. Title note supplied by Feminae.
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 57 - 81.
Year of Publication: 2004.

81. Record Number: 10826
Author(s): Simons, Walter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Staining the Speech of Things Divine: The Uses of Literacy in Medieval Beguine Communities [The author examines different kinds of evidence including vernacular texts written by Beguines, wills that bequeathed manuscripts to or from Beguines, and daily activities of Beguines involving the written word. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 85 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2004.

82. Record Number: 10827
Author(s): Hemptinne, Thérèse.de
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading, Writing, and Devotional Practices: Lay and Religious Women and the Written Word in the Low Countries (1350-1550) [The author argues in part that manuscripts in the vernacular served as a means of connection among female relatives and friends, both urban laywomen and those in religious life (Beguines as well as nuns). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 111 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2004.

83. Record Number: 10831
Author(s): Warnar, Geert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ex levitate mulierum: Masculine Mysticism and Jan Van Ruusbroec's Perception of Religious Women [The author argues that too much emphasis has been placed on the impact of medieval women's mysticism. Warnar cites van Ruusbroec's last work, "On the Twelve Beguines," suggesting that Van Ruusbroec uses the women's desperate attempts to know God as a foil for his subsequent discussion of technical procedures and theological positions. Warnar concludes that men and women occupied separate worlds. Therefore masculine forms of mystical devotion, emphasizing a controlled, intellectual approach, had little to do with the emotional, experiential approach of women like Hadewijch. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 193 - 206.
Year of Publication: 2004.

84. Record Number: 10832
Author(s): Scheepsma, Wybren.
Contributor(s):
Title : Check and Double-check: An Unknown Vision Cycle by a Religious Woman from the Low Countries [The text presents three visions revealed to an unidentified religious woman, possibly associated with the "Devotio Moderna." The visions were written down by an unknown cleric who was careful to explain that word came first through the woman's confessor and that the visions were approved by the confessor's superior who then ordered the author to record the visions. Scheepsma argues that the woman's scope of concerns was much smaller than Alijt Bake's or Jacomijne Coster's, two other visionary women associated with the Windesheim Chapter, but the male clerics involved still approached the three visions with reticence and emphasized the message of obedience over self will. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 207 - 222.
Year of Publication: 2004.

85. Record Number: 10850
Author(s): Campbell, Emma
Contributor(s):
Title : Sacrificial Spectacle and Interpassive Vision in the Anglo-Norman Life of Saint Faith [This chapter explores what I term, after Žižek, ‘interpassive vision’ in medieval French saints’ lives. The claim that hagiographic narratives are vehicles for male voyeurism achieved some currency in feminist scholarship of the 80s; this chapter deploys the notion of interpassive vision as a means of complicating such claims, reassessing the way these critics characterise gender and sexual desire and suggesting alternative approaches to the relationship between vision and reader response in medieval texts. Summary provided by the author.]
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 97 - 115.
Year of Publication: 2004.

86. Record Number: 11529
Author(s): Barclay-Lloyd, Joan E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Church and Monastery of S. Pancrazio, Rome [In 1204 Innocent III crowned Peter II of Aragon at San Pancrazio outside Rome. San Pancrazio had been a Benedictine monastery since the late 6th century, but the monks were replaced by a group of penitent women in 1255. These women became Cistercians shortly thereafter, remaining until Ambrosian Friars replaced them in 1438. The 13th-century reduction of the church to a single nave without side aisles and divided by a screen wall may represent adaptation to the need of these nuns for more privacy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Pope, Church and City: Essays in Honour of Brenda M. Bolton.   Edited by Frances Andrews, Christoph Egger and Constance M. Rousseau Medieval Mediterranean .   Brill, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 245 - 266.
Year of Publication: 2004.

87. Record Number: 11023
Author(s): Crachiolo, Beth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing the Gendering of Violence: Female and Male Martyrs in the "South English Legendary" [The author argues that while male martyrs have a variety of roles to play in the church, women martyrs simply react to those around them, ranging from cruel suitors to unfeeling torturers. Crachiolo suggests that the audience saw the female body as an object of entertainment though the hagiographer intended the descriptions of torture as a denial of the material world in the favor of Christian spirituality. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Great Effusion of Blood? Interpreting Medieval Violence.   Edited by Mark D. Meyerson, Daniel Thiery, and Oren Falk .   University of Toronto Press, 2004. Gesta , 44., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 147 - 163.
Year of Publication: 2004.

88. Record Number: 12852
Author(s): Bernardi, Simonetta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Testimoni di santita: I notai nel codicetto dei miracoli di Santa Sperandia (1276-1278) [A 14th-century manuscript records miracles of the Umbrian hermit Sperandia in a legalistic format signed by notaries. All the stories date to the period after the saint's death in the 13th century and relate to the part of Cingoli in which she was buried. The monastery honoring Sperandia was absorbed by San Marco, a nearby house of nuns,in the 14th century. The documents, besides honoring the saint, indicate the development of the region of Cingoli surrounding San Marco. Appendix: Archive of the Monastery of Santa Sperandia.Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Notai, miracoli e culto dei santi: pubblicita e autenticazione del sacro tra XII e XV secolo, Atti del Seminario internazionale, Roma, 5-7 dicembre 2002.   Edited by Raimondo Michetti .   Dott. A. Giuffre editore, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 561 - 585.
Year of Publication: 2004.

89. Record Number: 14095
Author(s): Reimann, Heike.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cistercian Nuns in the High Middle Ages: The Cistercians of Bergen in the Principality of Rügen (North Germany)
Source: Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 231 - 244.
Year of Publication: 2004.

90. Record Number: 15871
Author(s): Piatti, Pierantonio.
Contributor(s):
Title : Augustinianae mulieres: "Un problema storiografico: il "moveimento femminile agostiniano" nel Medioevo tra carisma ed istituzione [The Augustinian hermits, like the other mendicant orders, were mostly based in cities and towns. One of their roles was spiritual direction of pious women, both nuns and tertiaries. The hermits promoted the cult of Saint Monica, the mother of Augustine of Hippo. They also adapted the Rule of Augustine for use by women connected to the order. The hermits, however, issued few regulations for the care of these women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Quaderni Medievali , 58., (dicembre 2004):  Pages 43 - 61.
Year of Publication: 2004.

91. Record Number: 17744
Author(s): Tovalieri, Sabrina
Contributor(s):
Title : Damianite e Clarisse in Trentino e in Alto Adige nel XIII e XIV secolo [The Poor Clares had settled in Trent by 1228, where they received support from Pope Gregory IX. The monastery existed until 1809. The Clares' monastery in Bressanone was founded by 1235. It survives to the present day. The monastery in Merano was founded ca. 1309 and lasted until 1787. The houses in Merano and Bressanone were the object of reform efforts by Cardinal Nicholas of Cusa. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Collectanea Franciscana , 74., ( 2004):  Pages 557 - 580.
Year of Publication: 2004.

92. Record Number: 10821
Author(s): Irvine, Martin.
Contributor(s):
Title : Priests, Prophets, and Magicians: Max Weber and Pierre Bourdieu vs. Hildegard of Bingen [The author investigates Hildegard's status as a prophet using Weber's ideal of priest, prophet, and magician as interpreted by Pierre Bourdieu. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. Gesta , 44., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 3 - 22.
Year of Publication: 2004.

93. Record Number: 10883
Author(s): Ziegler, Joanna E.
Contributor(s):
Title : On the Artistic Nature of Elisabeth of Spalbeek's Ecstasy: The Southern Low Countries Do Matter [The author argues that Elisabeth von Spalbeek should be considered an artist and that her reenactments of the passion can best be understood in visual terms as akin to theatrical performances. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Texture of Society: Medieval Women in the Southern Low Countries.   Edited by Ellen E. Kittell and Mary A. Suydam .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Gesta , 44., 1 ( 2005):  Pages 181 - 202.
Year of Publication: 2004.

94. Record Number: 11423
Author(s): Peterson, Janine Larmon.
Contributor(s):
Title : Social Roles, Gender Inversion, and the Heretical Sect: The Case of the Guglielmites
Source: Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 203 - 219.
Year of Publication: 2004.

95. Record Number: 10881
Author(s): Suydam, Mary A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Visionaries in the Public Eye: Beguine Literature as Performance [The author analyzes both the "Vitae" of holy women and accounts of their visions. Suydam, using performance theory and modern understandings of ritual, emphasizes the collective nature, not only of the beguine public performances, but of the author and copyists as well as the audience of readers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Texture of Society: Medieval Women in the Southern Low Countries.   Edited by Ellen E. Kittell and Mary A. Suydam .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 131 - 152.
Year of Publication: 2004.

96. Record Number: 10851
Author(s): Mills, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Seeing Face to Face: Troubled Looks in the Katherine Group [The author explores similarities between Lacanian gaze theory and two texts of the Katherine Group, "Hali Meidenhad" and "Sawles Warde." The anchoritic readers are asked to imagine a variety of positions from the panoptic virgin superior to the servant of God beset by Lechery. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Viator , 35., ( 2004):  Pages 117 - 136.
Year of Publication: 2004.

97. Record Number: 11027
Author(s): Mazour-Matusevich, Yelena.
Contributor(s):
Title : Late Medieval "Counseling": Jean Gerson (1363-1419) as a Family Pastor
Source: Journal of Family History , 29., 2 (April 2004):  Pages 153 - 167.
Year of Publication: 2004.

98. Record Number: 14094
Author(s): Faesen, Rob S.J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Was Hadewijch a Beguine or a Cistercian? An Annotated Hypothesis
Source: Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40180 ( 2004):  Pages 47 - 63.
Year of Publication: 2004.

99. Record Number: 13672
Author(s): Clancy-Smith, Julia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Exemplary Women and Sacred Journeys: Women and Gender in Judaism, Christianity, and Islam from Late Antiquity to the Eve of Modernity [The author explores themes involving women's nature and prescribed behavior, exemplary women from scripture and history, and pilgrimage and saints' cults in Judaism, Western Christianity, and Islam. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women's History in Global Perspective Volume 1.   Edited by Bonnie G. Smith .   University of Illinois Press, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40180 ( 2004):  Pages 92 - 144.
Year of Publication: 2004.

100. Record Number: 12882
Author(s): Phillips, Kim M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe and the Ages of Woman [Phillips explores medieval ideas about women's lifecycle. Generally authors divided women's lives into three parts: maiden, wife, and widow. In her book, however, Margery Kempe does not adhere to this scheme. There is very little about her girlhood, and her role as wife is attenuated by a vow of chastity. In this regard, as in others, the "Book of Margery Kempe" presents a unique view of life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "The Book of Margery Kempe."   Edited by John H. Arnold and Katherine J. Lewis .   D. S. Brewer, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40180 ( 2004):  Pages 17 - 34.
Year of Publication: 2004.

101. Record Number: 11392
Author(s): Berman, Constance H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eleanor of Aquitane and the Quarrel Over Medieval Women's Power [Third article in a roundtable entitled "Re-presenting Eleanor of Aquitaine." The author addresses the historiography of women in the Middle Ages, arguing that since medieval survey courses are often taught in two parts, the periodization distorts women's history. Berman urges historians to do more archival work, particularly in monastic sources where the careers of postmenopausal women who exercised power and authority are more apparent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Feminist Forum , 37., (Spring 2004):  Pages 21 - 26.
Year of Publication: 2004.

102. Record Number: 11420
Author(s): Hall, Dianne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Necessary Collaborations: Religious Women and Lay Communities in Medieval Ireland, c. 1200-1540 [The author argues that the boundaries between Irish women's monastic houses and lay communities were permeable. Nuns sought good relations with neighbors and family members to ensure material and political support. Monastic women needed to ignore the rules of enclosure in order to adminster the monasteries' lands and keep in touch with their families. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Irish Women's History.   Edited by Alan Hayes and Diane Urquhart .   Irish Academic Press, 2004. Medieval Feminist Forum , 37., (Spring 2004):  Pages 15 - 28.
Year of Publication: 2004.

103. Record Number: 11419
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hail Brigit!: Gender, Authority, and Worship in Early Ireland [The author sets her study of Brigit within seventh century struggles for political and religious dominance in Ireland. Brigit's hagiographers sought to bolster her authority in order to strengthen the claims of the abbess of Kildare and her communitity to not only the churches in Leinster and the midlands but to all the religious women in Ireland. Bitel argues that paradoxically the basis of Brigit's authority comes from her gender; her hagiographies identify her powers as uniquely female. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Irish Women's History.   Edited by Alan Hayes and Diane Urquhart .   Irish Academic Press, 2004. Medieval Feminist Forum , 37., (Spring 2004):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 2004.

104. Record Number: 14096
Author(s): Freeman, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Houses of a Peculiar Order: Cistercian Nunneries in Medieval England, with Special Attention to the Fifteenth and Sixteenth Centuries [Only two English women's monasteries, Marham and Tarrant, were officially incorporated as Cistercian houses. However, visitation records, mortuary rolls, and other evidence document unofficial houses for women that claimed Cistercian privileges. Freeman
Source: Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 245 - 287.
Year of Publication: 2004.

105. Record Number: 10882
Author(s): Wiethaus, Ulrike.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Death Song of Marie d'Oignies: Mystical Sound and Hagiographical Politics in Medieval Lorraine [The author analyzes three biographical texts, written by Jacques de Vitry, Thomas de Cantimpré, and the anonymous author of the "History of the Church of Oignies." Weithaus places particular emphasis on the ideologies, both political and theological, that each author emphasizes in his account of Marie's life. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Texture of Society: Medieval Women in the Southern Low Countries.   Edited by Ellen E. Kittell and Mary A. Suydam .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Cîteaux: Revue d'Histoire Cistercienne , 55., 40241 ( 2004):  Pages 153 - 179.
Year of Publication: 2004.

106. Record Number: 9808
Author(s): McNamara, Jo Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Failure to Communicate [The author considers four recent books about women and the Church. Two of them concern women in the Middle Ages (Jane Tibbetts Schulenburg, "Forgetful of Their Sex: Female Sanctity and Society, ca. 500-1100" and Walter Simons, "Cities of Ladies: Beguine Communities in the Medieval Low Countries, 1200-1565). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Journal of Women's History (Full Text via Project Muse) 15, 2 (Summer 2003): 188-196. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

107. Record Number: 10057
Author(s): Callan, Maeve B.
Contributor(s):
Title : St. Darerca and Her Sister Scholars: Women and Education in Medieval Ireland
Source: Gender and History , 15., 1 (April 2003):  Pages 32 - 49.
Year of Publication: 2003.

108. Record Number: 10217
Author(s): Bartoli, Marco.
Contributor(s):
Title : La minorita in Chiara d'Assisi [The Poor Clares occasionally were called "minorite" sisters in early thirteenth-century texts. Gregory IX, however, restricted the term to Franciscan males, and he denied the Clares use of a version of the Franciscan habit. Clare herself seems to have preferred to call her community the "poor sisters." Many later Francscian women, including some of the order's saints, did not have the foundress' sense of being lowly and subordinate to all. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Minores et subditi omnibus: tratti caratterizzanti dell'identità francescana: atti del Convegno, Roma 26-27 novembre 2002.   Edited by Luigi Padovese .   Edizioni Collegio S. Lorenzo da Brindisi- Laurentianum, 2003. Gender and History , 15., 1 (April 2003):  Pages 205 - 216.
Year of Publication: 2003.

109. Record Number: 10569
Author(s): Scheepsma, Wybren.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mysticism and Modern Devotion: Alijt Bake's (1415-1455) Lessons in the Mystical Way of Living [Alijt Bake had a special gift for the mystical life. When she became prioress of Galilea (a house associated with the Modern Devotion), she attempted to reform the nuns' external methods toward a more internalized spirituality. Bake wrote texts for the nuns as well as a spiritual autobiography and a letter from exile. The leaders of the Windesheim Chapter not only removed her as prioress in 1454 but sent her from Ghent to Antwerp. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Spirituality renewed: studies on significant representatives of the Modern Devotion.   Edited by Hein Blommestijn, Charles Caspers, and Rijcklof Hofman Studies in spirituality. Supplement .  10 2003. Gender and History , 15., 1 (April 2003):  Pages 157 - 167.
Year of Publication: 2003.

110. Record Number: 11831
Author(s): Aston, Margaret.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lollard Women [The author examines women's involvement in the Lollard movement from three aspects: 1) women's domestic situation ; 2) women's opportunities for reading and teaching ; 3) the church and religious ritual in terms of women's roles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Gender and History , 15., 1 (April 2003):  Pages 166 - 185.
Year of Publication: 2003.

111. Record Number: 8948
Author(s): Edsall, Mary Agnes.
Contributor(s):
Title : True Anchoresses are Called Birds: Asceticism as Ascent and the Purgative Mysticism of the "Ancrene Wisse"
Source: Viator , 34., ( 2003):  Pages 157 - 186.
Year of Publication: 2003.

112. Record Number: 15854
Author(s): D'Acunto, Nicolangelo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Santa Giulia e la cultura a Brescia, Brescia, il 11 ottobre 2002 [Founded in the Lombard Period, the monastery of Santa Giulia endured through the Middle Ages as a house of nuns. The Venetians incorporated the monastery into the Observant Congregation of Santa Giustina of Padua in the later Middle Ages. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Quaderni Medievali , 55., (giugno 2003):  Pages 219 - 223.
Year of Publication: 2003.

113. Record Number: 19629
Author(s): Chiti, Elisa
Contributor(s):
Title : Si cor sentit, hoc non est ipsa. Morte dello spirito e liberazione del cuore in Margherita Porete [Marguerite Porete believed the soul had to suffer successive deaths - to sin, to nature, and to the spirit - to achieve annhilation, being united with God. This last involved the loss of the individual will. Porete used Cistercian and Augustinian elements in her mystical writing, but she regarded the will as the obstacle to union with God. With it gone, true union was possible. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Micrologus: Natura, scienze e società medievali , 11., ( 2003):  Pages 305 - 323. Il cuore/The Heart
Year of Publication: 2003.

114. Record Number: 10896
Author(s): Mueller, Joan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Agnes of Prague and the Rule of St. Clare
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 155 - 167.
Year of Publication: 2003.

115. Record Number: 10748
Author(s): Carroll, Jane L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Woven Devotions: Reform and Piety in Tapestries by Dominican Nuns [The author examines two tapestries that were produced by Dominican nuns in Germany. Both have small depictions of nuns working at looms in the margins. Carroll suggests that these images are part self-portraits, part devotional images, while also serving as exemplars of the Dominican reform for a "vita activa" that avoided luxury and sloth. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Jane L. Carroll and Alison G. Stewart .   Ashgate, 2003. Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 182 - 201.
Year of Publication: 2003.

116. Record Number: 9712
Author(s): Wolbrink, Shelley Amiste.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women in the Premonstratensian Order of Northwestern Germany, 1120-1250 [The established historiography of the Premonstratensians shows women being marginalized from the early years onward. The documentary record is more complex. The German records show men's houses serving as "mother" houses to women's monasteries. This relationship was not free of conflict, but it shows a more vital presence of women in the order than the historiography has claimed. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Catholic Historical Review (Full Text via Project Muse) 89, 3 (July 2003): 387-408. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

117. Record Number: 10963
Author(s): Strocchia, Sharon T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Taken into Custody: Girls and Convent Guardianship in Renaissance Florence
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 177 - 200.
Year of Publication: 2003.

118. Record Number: 8065
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : With the Heat of the Hungry Heart : Empowerment and "Ancrene Wisse" [Watson presents his article in two parts. First he argues that the author of the "Ancrene Wisse" conceives of his anchoress readers as herioc figures whose difficult lives raise them above others and serve as a sign of the coming breakdown between clergy and laity. Secondly Watson looks at the influences the text had on later writings which were addressed to lay readers, frequently men. Title note supplied by Feminae. ].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 52 - 70.
Year of Publication: 2003.

119. Record Number: 8064
Author(s): Elliott, Dyan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Confession : From Empowerment to Pathology [The author traces the development of the practice of confession. She concentrates in particular on the relationship between the female penitent and the confessor, pointing out the affective aspects with many women predisposed to confess frequently and to be overly scrupulous in their recounting of sins. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 31 - 51.
Year of Publication: 2003.

120. Record Number: 11656
Author(s): Mills, Robert.
Contributor(s):
Title : Can the Virgin Martyr Speak? [The author draws out parallels between the virgin martyr and the Hindu widow who commits sati. At issue are the tensions between victimization and empowerment within the context of patriarchy, social class, and gender. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Virginities.   Edited by Anke Bernau, Ruth Evans, and Sarah Salih .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages series. University of Wales Press; University of Toronto Press, 2003. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 187 - 213.
Year of Publication: 2003.

121. Record Number: 11086
Author(s): Savage, Anne.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Communal Authorship of "Ancrene Wisse" [Savage argues that the male cleric traditionally identified as the author of the "Ancrene Wisse" wrote out of his long experience with the three anchoress sisters and reacted to their comments and suggestions. The text should properly be considered to have been jointly authored. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 17., 2 (June 2003):  Pages 45 - 55.
Year of Publication: 2003.

122. Record Number: 9721
Author(s): Craig, Leigh Ann
Contributor(s):
Title : Stronger Than Men and Braver Than Knights: Women and the Pilgrimages to Jerusalem and Rome in the Later Middle Ages
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 29., 3 (September 2003):  Pages 153 - 175.
Year of Publication: 2003.

123. Record Number: 14255
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Ingesting Bodily Filth: Defilement in the Spirituality of Angela of Foligno [The author argues that Angela of Foligno ate scabs from lepers joyfully as a sacred act likened to the Eucharist. Morrison compares the similar experiences of Catherine of Siena, Francis of Assisi, and Catherine of Genoa but finds differing motives inclu
Source: Romance Quarterly , 50., 3 (Summer 2003):  Pages 204 - 216.
Year of Publication: 2003.

124. Record Number: 11051
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Tak and Bren Hir: Lollardry as Conversion Motif in "The Book of Margery Kempe" [The author argues that the text presents Margery as religously and socially aberrant. Yet this is necessary to prove that she is chosen by God as a spiritual instructor. The charges of Lollardy allow her doubters to convert eventually, while also emphasizing her orthodoxy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Mystics Quarterly , 29., 40180 (March-June 2003):  Pages 24 - 44.
Year of Publication: 2003.

125. Record Number: 8067
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Who is the Master of This Narrative? Maternal Patronage of the Cult of St. Margaret [The author argues that the needs of women in childbirth prevailed in the texts and images of Saint Margaret. The surviving artifacts emphasize her miraculous deliverance from the dragon although learned clerics tried to excise this doubtful incident from the tradition. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Gendering the Master Narrative: Women and Power in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Mary C. Erler and Maryanne Kowaleski .   Cornell University Press, 2003. Mystics Quarterly , 29., 40180 (March-June 2003):  Pages 94 - 104.
Year of Publication: 2003.

126. Record Number: 13051
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Continuum of Time and Eternity in the "Liber specialis gratiae" of Mechtild of Hackeborn (1241-99) [In addition to considering briefly the issues of eternity and time, Caron also addresses Mechtild's use of imagery, in particular the heart as house and the fellowship of the angels, both of which were used to express her devotion to heaven. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Time and eternity: the medieval discourse.   Edited by Gerhard Jaritz and Gerson Moreno-Riaño International Medieval Research .   Brepols, 2003. Mystics Quarterly , 29., 40180 (March-June 2003):  Pages 251 - 269.
Year of Publication: 2003.

127. Record Number: 10895
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : To Be Satisfied: Julian of Norwich and the Meaning of Atonement
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 141 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2003.

128. Record Number: 10894
Author(s): Fusco, Roberto.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Contemplation of Christ Crucified in Julian of Norwich
Source: Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 119 - 139.
Year of Publication: 2003.

129. Record Number: 10570
Author(s): Pol, Frank van der.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Book of Hours from the Sisters of Saint Agnes in Kampen: A Spiritual Guide for a Community of Worship [The author focuses on the community of the sisters of Saint Agnes, a female house of tertiaries, who were influenced by the Devotio Moderna. From their book of hours, he concentrates on two offices, the "Office of All Saints" and the "Office of Saint Agnes." The various experiences associated with death and dying are emphasized. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Spirituality renewed: studies on significant representatives of the Modern Devotion.   Edited by Hein Blommestijn, Charles Caspers, and Rijcklof Hofman Studies in spirituality. Supplement .  10 2003. Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 169 - 192.
Year of Publication: 2003.

130. Record Number: 10571
Author(s): Caspers, Charles.
Contributor(s):
Title : Liduina, the Virgin of Schiedam: Rise, Flourishing, and Waning of a Saint Cult, c. 1400-c. 2000 [As a child, Liduina was injured and spent the rest of her life confined to bed. The author traces the shifting meaning of her acceptance of suffering and devotion to the Eucharist across time. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Spirituality renewed: studies on significant representatives of the Modern Devotion.   Edited by Hein Blommestijn, Charles Caspers, and Rijcklof Hofman Studies in spirituality. Supplement .  10 2003. Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 193 - 207.
Year of Publication: 2003.

131. Record Number: 11824
Author(s): Crawford, Sally.
Contributor(s):
Title : Anglo-Saxon Women, Furnished Burial, and the Church [The author discusses the possible meanings of women's burials during the Conversion Period in Anglo-Saxon England. Scholars have attributed Christian or non-Christian beliefs to the locations of burials (churchyards, barrows, and ancestral graveyards), presence or absence of grave goods, and inclusion of seemingly Christian symbols like cruciform jewellry. The need for high status families to display their prestige and wealth through an ostentatious burial of a female member is also an important consideration. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 1 - 12.
Year of Publication: 2003.

132. Record Number: 11830
Author(s): Swanson, R. N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Will the Real Margery Kempe Please Stand Up! [The author examines "The Book of Margery Kempe" for religion as it was experienced by women. Swanson cites in particular male roles in Margery's spiritual life, pilgrimage, the urban milieu, pardons and indulgences, heresy, and the influence of devotional literature read to Margery (who was likely illiterate). Swanson suggests that in some respects Margery was like many other lay women who were deeply concerned about their salvation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 141 - 165.
Year of Publication: 2003.

133. Record Number: 11827
Author(s): Manzalaoui, Mahmoud A.
Contributor(s):
Title : English Medieval Nunneries: Buildings, Precincts, and Estates [The author surveys both archaeological and textual monastic buildings and estates. Bond concludes that women's houses, unlike men's monasteries, were not distinctive according to religious order. They tend to be poorer and were usually not able to increase their holdings after the twelfth century. Bond describes all the different kinds of buildings involved including churches, gatehouses, cloisters, refectories, bake houses, and barns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Studies in Spirituality , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 46 - 90.
Year of Publication: 2003.

134. Record Number: 9637
Author(s): Robertson, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : This Living Hand: Thirteenth-Century Female Literacy, Materialist Immanence, and the Reader of the "Ancrene Wisse" [The author first surveys the manuscripts of the "Ancrene Wisse" and the languages that early readers would have used. Then she analyzes the broadly historical context of thirteenth century female religious readers. In the final section, Robertson focuses
Source: Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 1 - 36. Abridged version published in Medieval Literature: Criticism and Debates. Edited by Holly A. Crocker and D. Vance Smith. Routledge, 2014. Pages 162-179.
Year of Publication: 2003.

135. Record Number: 11828
Author(s): Rawcliffe, Carole
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Childbirth, and Religion in Later Medieval England [The author traces the means by which the church offered support and aid to women facing childbirth. Rawcliffe also accounts for varied responses provided by popular religion including saints, shrines, and charms. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Women and Religion in Medieval England.   Edited by Diana Wood .   Oxbow Books, 2003. Speculum , 78., 1 (January 2003):  Pages 91 - 117.