Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


37 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 35279
Author(s): Montesano, Marina
Contributor(s):
Title : Preaching, Magic, and Witchcraft: A Feedback Effect?
Source: From Words to Deeds: The Effectiveness of Preaching in the Late Middle Ages   Edited by Maria Giuseppina Muzzarelli .   Brepols, 2014.  Pages 153 - 170.
Year of Publication: 2014.

2. Record Number: 32864
Author(s): Bailey, Michael D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Nocturnal Journeys and Ritual Dances in Bernardino of Siena
Source: Magic, Ritual, and Witchcraft , 8., 1 ( 2013):  Pages 4 - 17.
Year of Publication: 2013.

3. Record Number: 32413
Author(s): Izbicki, Thomas M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Antoninus of Florence and the Dominican Witch Theorists
Source: Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 347 - 361.
Year of Publication: 2012.

4. Record Number: 13779
Author(s): Ferzoco, George.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Massa Marittima Mural [The Massa Marittima mural, discovered in 2000 on the site of a public fountain, has been interpreted, because of the presence of imperial eagles, as a piece of pro-Empire Ghibelline art. Yet the presence of a woman being sodomized beneath an eagle sugges
Source: Il murale di Massa Marittina. George Ferzoco Toscana Studies .  2004. Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 71 - 92. [In Italian on pp.29-50]
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 16586
Author(s): Hults, Linda C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dürer's "Four Witches" Reconsidered [The author argues that Dürer's engraving should be viewed in conjunction with the "Malleus maleficarum" as part of the developing theory on women's sexuality and witchcraft. Hults suggests that Dürer cleverly combined a variety of visual allusions includ
Source: Saints, Sinners, and Sisters: Gender and Northern Art in Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Jane L. Carroll and Alison G. Stewart .   Ashgate, 2003. Memorie Domenicane , 42., ( 2012):  Pages 94 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 9340
Author(s): Broedel, Hans Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : To Preserve the Manly Form from So Vile a Crime: Ecclesiastical Anti-Sodomitic Rhetoric and the Gendering of Witchcraft in the "Malleus Maleficarum" [Broedel argues that Heinrich Krämer, the author, with the help of Jacob Sprenger, of the "Malleus maleficarum," adopted the language and critiques of sodomy to describe witchcraft, thus making it a crime of deviant sexuality. Since women were naturally predisposed to witchcraft due to weaknesses in their nature, they were lured into sexual sins with demons. Men who were enchanted by witches lost their potency or became emasculated. Using these kinds of arguments, Krämer created a witch that was much more threatening than in other contemporary tracts. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 136-148. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 9339
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Feminization of Magic and the Emerging Idea of the Female Witch in the Late Middle Ages [This article explores Johannes Nider's text "Formicarius," written around 1437, and the first to state that women were more likely to be witches. Previously theologians had expressed concern over necromancy performed by learned men. However, women now posed a threat because their natures suited them to witchcraft, a feminized form of magic requiring sexual submission to the devil. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 19 (2002): 120-134. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 6052
Author(s): Bailey, Michael D.
Contributor(s):
Title : From Sorcery to Witchcraft: Clerical Conceptions of Magic in the Later Middle Ages
Source: Speculum , 76., 4 (October 2001):  Pages 960 - 990.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 8493
Author(s): Cárdenas-Rotunno, Anthony J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rojas's Celestina and Claudina: In Search of a Witch [The author argues that Rojas never presents either Celestina or her teacher Claudina as witches. While Claudina was accused once as a witch, in the "Celestina" they use magic but have not renounced Christianity nor made pacts with the devil. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Hispanic Review , 69., 3 (Summer 2001):  Pages 277 - 297.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 4137
Author(s): Williams, Bermadette.
Contributor(s):
Title : She Was Usually Placed with the Great Men and Leaders of the Land in the Public Assemblies- Alice Kyteler: A Woman of Considerable Power [her step-children accused her of witchcraft ; Richard Ledrede, Bishop of Ossory, doggedly pursued her].
Source: Women in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Christine Meek .   Four Courts Press, 2000. Speculum , 76., 4 (October 2001):  Pages 67 - 83.
Year of Publication: 2000.

11. Record Number: 5716
Author(s): Maxwell-Stuart, P. G.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Emergence of the Christian Witch [The author briefly traces the development of ideas about witches from late Antiquity through the fifteenth century; aimed at a popular audience, there are no footnotes].
Source: History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 38 - 43.
Year of Publication: 2000.

12. Record Number: 6690
Author(s): Troncarelli, Fabio.
Contributor(s):
Title : Immagini di streghe nei manoscritti medievali [increased belief in witches in the late Middle Ages also involved more frequent illustration of them and their revels; lascivious human figures were combined with animal or demonic figures, often in orgiastic scenes; like Venus, lascivious witches were symbols of lust, in contrast to sacred love; satanic love magic was one of the crimes attributed to witches].
Source: Imaging Humanity/Immagini dell' umanità.   Edited by John Casey, Mary Warnement, Jim Whelton, and Anne Wingenter .   Bordighera, 2000. History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 79 - 92.
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 4136
Author(s): Meek, Christine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men, Women, and Magic: Some Cases from Late Medieval Lucca
Source: Women in Renaissance and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by Christine Meek .   Four Courts Press, 2000. Speculum , 76., 4 (October 2001):  Pages 43 - 66.
Year of Publication: 2000.

14. Record Number: 5367
Author(s): Enders, Jody.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cutting Off the Memory of Women [The author argues that the "Malleus Maleficarum" demonized women's memory and thereby justified violence against women].
Source: The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric.   Edited by Christine Mason Sutherland and Rebecca Sutcliffe .   Papers at the Conference of the International Society for the History of Rhetoric at the University of Saskatchewan in July, 1997. University of Calgary Press, 1999. History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 47 - 55.
Year of Publication: 1999.

15. Record Number: 3772
Author(s): Whitney, Elspeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Witches, Saints and Other "Others": Women and Deviance in Medieval Culture [The author provides an introductory overview of the ideas about women that set the stage for the witch hunts of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries].
Source: Women in Medieval Western European Culture.   Edited by Linda E. Mitchell .   Garland Publishing, 1999. History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 295 - 312.
Year of Publication: 1999.

16. Record Number: 4386
Author(s): Wiethaus, Ulrike.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Spirituality, Medieval Women, and Commercialism in the United States [the author examines popular, commercialized uses of medieval women and religion including the figure of the witch, calendars and other merchandise, and two popular anthologies of women's spiritual writings, "Beguine Spirituality" edited by Fiona Bowie and "The Hidden Tradition" edited by Lavinia Byrne].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999. History Today , 50., 11 (November 2000):  Pages 297 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1999.

17. Record Number: 3210
Author(s): Enders, Jody.
Contributor(s):
Title : Violence, Silence, and the Memory of Witches
Source: Violence Against Women in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Anna Roberts .   University Press of Florida, 1998. Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 28., 3 (Fall 1998):  Pages 210 - 232.
Year of Publication: 1998.

18. Record Number: 3108
Author(s): Stephens, Walter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Witches Who Steal Penises: Impotence and Illusion in "Malleus maleficarum"
Source: Journal of Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 28., 3 (Fall 1998):  Pages 495 - 529.
Year of Publication: 1998.

19. Record Number: 1377
Author(s): Nenno, Nancy P.
Contributor(s):
Title : Between Magic and Medicine: Medieval Images of the Woman Healer [the figures of Queen Îsôt and Feimurgan demonstrate worries that women healers provoked: unregulated practices, superstition, use of magic, even dependence on demonic aid].
Source: Women Healers and Physicians: Climbing a Long Hill.   Edited by Lilian R. Furst .   University Press of Kentucky, 1997. German Life and Letters , 50., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 43 - 63.
Year of Publication: 1997.

20. Record Number: 6093
Author(s): Troncarelli, Fabio.
Contributor(s):
Title : Streghe medievali e moderne [In the late Middle Ages, witches, once dismissed as deluded, became regarded, like the Jews, as a group inimical to Christian society; medieval judges were less eager to convict them than were their successors, and so they listened more closely to the testimony brought to them; some jurists and humanists attempted to restrain the rush to judgement prompted by the anxieties awakened by the profound changes in Renaissance society].
Source: Quaderni Medievali , 43., (giugno 1997):  Pages 135 - 144.
Year of Publication: 1997.

21. Record Number: 3296
Author(s): Zitzlsperger, Ulrike.
Contributor(s):
Title : Narren, Schelme und Frauen: Zum Verhähltnis von Narrentum und Weiblichkeit in der Literatur des spätmittelalters und der frühen Neuzeit
Source: German Life and Letters , 50., 4 ( 1997):  Pages 403 - 416.
Year of Publication: 1997.

22. Record Number: 3589
Author(s): Grundy, Stephan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Viking's Mother: Relations Between Mothers and Their Grown Sons in Icelandic Sagas
Source: Medieval Mothering.   Edited by John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Magistra , 2., 1 (Summer 1996):  Pages 223 - 237.
Year of Publication: 1996.

23. Record Number: 1586
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Medieval Concept of the Witches' Sabbath [analysis of four early texts from the 1430's ; the author argues that the witches' sabbath gained quick acceptance because it explained how common people could take command of a learned form of magic].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 2 (Fall 1996):  Pages 419 - 439.
Year of Publication: 1996.

24. Record Number: 1219
Author(s): Lundy, Anita.
Contributor(s):
Title : Carnality and Witchcraft: The Salaciousness of Women as a Foundation for the "Malleus Maleficarium"
Source: Magistra , 2., 1 (Summer 1996):  Pages 63 - 87.
Year of Publication: 1996.

25. Record Number: 1983
Author(s): Keil, Gundolf.
Contributor(s):
Title : Folter als Regeneration. Zur Logik von Hexerei im Mittelalter
Source: Mediaevistik , 8., ( 1995):  Pages 75 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 1530
Author(s): Scheelar, Margo Husby.
Contributor(s):
Title : El Auto IX y la Destronizacion de Melibea [The author uses Bakhtin's theory of the carnivalesque to examine the descriptions of Melibea in Act Nine].
Source: Celestinesca , 19., 40180 ( 1995):  Pages 57 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1995.

27. Record Number: 5553
Author(s): Warner, Marina.
Contributor(s):
Title : Joan of Arc: A Gender Myth [The author examines two major issues: the question of witchcraft at Joan's trial and how her boyishness and cross dressing came in later centuries to be associated with female virtue].
Source: Joan of Arc: Reality and Myth.   Edited by Jan van Herwaarden Publikaties van de Faculteit der Historische en Kunstwetenschappen. Maatschappijgeschiedenis .   Verloren, 1994. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 24., 3 (Fall 1994):  Pages 96 - 117.
Year of Publication: 1994.

28. Record Number: 3464
Author(s): Valbuena, Olga Lucia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sorceresses, Love Magic, and the Inquisition of Linguistic Sorcery in "Celestina"
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (Full Text via JSTOR) 109, 2 (March 1994): 207-224. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

29. Record Number: 5958
Author(s): McMahon, James V.
Contributor(s):
Title : Valkyries, Midwives, Weavers, and Shape-Changers: Atli's Mother the Snake
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 66., 4 (Fall 1994):  Pages 475 - 487.
Year of Publication: 1994.

30. Record Number: 4227
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Holy and the Unholy: Sainthood, Witchcraft, and Magic in Late Medieval Europe [The author provides several female examples of witches and saints including Dorothea von Montau, Joan of Arc, and Eustochio da Padua].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 24., 3 (Fall 1994):  Pages 355 - 385.
Year of Publication: 1994.

31. Record Number: 5834
Author(s): Tarbin, Stephanie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Knowledge and Gender: The "Malleus Malificarum" of 1485 [The author argues that the "Malleus" equates the Church with masculine power and knowledge while witchcraft, female nature, and devils all share the same negative characteristics].
Source: Sexuality and Gender in History: Selected Essays.   Edited by Penelope Hetherington and Philippa Maddern .   Centre for Western Australian History, University of Western Australia, 1993. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 24., 3 (Fall 1994):  Pages 45 - 62.
Year of Publication: 1993.

32. Record Number: 10530
Author(s): Duby, Georges.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affidavits and Confessions [Medieval women’s voices are often mediated by men, but records of legal testimony provide some access to unmediated female voices. The author gives a partial transcription of the testimony of Grazida and Beatrice, two fourteenth-century French widows who were interrogated on suspicions of witchcraft and heresy. The women confess to having multiple affairs and having sex with priests. Both were sentenced for heresy but eventually had their sentences commuted as long as they wore yellow crosses on their clothing. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 24., 3 (Fall 1994):  Pages 483 - 491.
Year of Publication: 1992.

33. Record Number: 11045
Author(s): Jochens, Jenny.
Contributor(s):
Title : Old Norse Magic and Gender: Þáttr Þorvalds ens Víðforla [The author studies fourteen scenes of the supernatural in Norse family sagas, and argues that, in thirteenth-century Scandinavia, men joined women in the exercise of pagan magic. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Scandinavian Studies , 63., 3 (Summer 1991):  Pages 305 - 317.
Year of Publication: 1991.

34. Record Number: 8678
Author(s): Corsi, Dinora.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dal sacrificio al maleficio: La donna e il sacro nell'eresia e nella stregoneria [Womens roles feature prominently in all interpretations of witchcraft. One element in this history is the gradual exclusion of Christian women from all sacramental functions. Many medieval women were attracted to religious movements, some of them heretical. Witchcraft was seen as one more movement of rebellion against orthodoxy, particularly with the prominent role taken by women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Quaderni Medievali , 30., (dicembre 1990):  Pages 8 - 62.
Year of Publication: 1990.

35. Record Number: 12856
Author(s): Harley, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Historians as Demonologists: The Myth of the Midwife-Witch [The author argues against the belief that midwives were frequently persecuted as witches throughout the medieval and early-modern periods. Article includes a summary. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Social History of Medicine , 3., 1 (April 1990):  Pages 1 - 26.
Year of Publication: 1990.

36. Record Number: 30920
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Four Witches/Four Naked Women
Source: Social History of Medicine , 3., 1 (April 1990):
Year of Publication:

37. Record Number: 31814
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Waldensian Witches, from Le champion des dames
Source: Social History of Medicine , 3., 1 (April 1990):
Year of Publication: