Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


20 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 14741
Author(s): Haycock, Marged.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sy abl fodd, Sibli fain: Sibyl in Medieval Wales [The author analyzes two different instances of the Sibyl figure in Welsh literature. The first examples come from two thirteenth century Welsh translations of the Latin Tiburtine oracles, "Breuddwyd Sibli" and "Proffwydoliaeth Sibli Ddoeth." The second example is drawn from a poem by the female poet Gwerful Mechain who countered Ieuan Dyfi's misogynist complaint by recounting the lives of brave women capped by the Sibyl. Haycock suggests that Gwerful may have taken the example of the Sibyl as a female forerunner to legitimize her public writing. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source:   Edited by Joseph Falaky Nagy and Leslie Ellen Jones Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) Yearbook , 3-4., ( 2005):  Pages 115 - 130. Heroic Poets and Poetic Heroes in Celtic Tradition: A Festschrift for Patrick K. Ford. Edited by Joseph Falaky Nagy and Leslie Ellen Jones. Four Courts Press, 2005
Year of Publication: 2005.

2. Record Number: 14742
Author(s): Klar, Kathryn A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetry and Pillowtalk [The author analyzes a scene between Arawn and his queen in the "Mabinogion." He had traded shapes unbeknownst to his wife for a year and is now back at home. The two come to an understanding in exchanges that are reminiscent of poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source:   Edited by Joseph Falaky Nagy and Leslie Ellen Jones Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) Yearbook , 40241., ( 2005):  Pages 239 - 246. Heroic Poets and Poetic Heroes in CelticTradition: A Festschrift for Patrick K. Ford. Edited by Joseph Falaky Nagy and Leslie Ellen Jones. Four Courts Press, 2005
Year of Publication: 2005.

3. Record Number: 8082
Author(s): Nugent, Christopher G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Riannon: The Problematics of Motherhood in "Pwyll Pendeuic Dyuet" [The author focuses on the episode in which Riannon, the queen, is wrongly accused by her serving women of killing her newborn son. Riannon must accept a strange ritual humiliation as her punishment until the baby is brought back to the royal court. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Domestic Violence in Medieval Texts.   Edited by Eve Salisbury, Georgiana Donavin, and Merrall Llewelyn Price .   University Press of Florida, 2002. Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) Yearbook , 40241., ( 2005):  Pages 180 - 202.
Year of Publication: 2002.

4. Record Number: 4807
Author(s): Lloyd-Morgan, Ceridwen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Querelle des Femmes": A Continuing Tradition in Welsh Women's Literature [the author analyzes a poem by the woman author Gwerful Mechain in which she responds to a diatribe against women by the male poet Ieuan Dyfi; Gwenful Mechain cites women fromWelsh history, the Bible and the classical tradition all who had important achievements].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000. Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) Yearbook , 40241., ( 2005):  Pages 101 - 114.
Year of Publication: 2000.

5. Record Number: 2581
Author(s): Winward, Fiona.
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Aspects of the Women in "The Four Branches" [analysis of female characters through various life-stages (single women, married women, estranged wives, and mothers); argues that the women display independence and are more memorable than the male characters because they are able to manipulate situations for their own best interests].
Source: Cambrian Medieval Celtic Studies , 34., (Winter 1997):  Pages 77 - 106.
Year of Publication: 1997.

6. Record Number: 3997
Author(s): Hemming, Jessica.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sellam gestare: Saddle-Bearing Punishments and the Case of Rhiannon
Source: Viator , 28., ( 1997):  Pages 45 - 64.
Year of Publication: 1997.

7. Record Number: 2266
Author(s): Cartwright, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Desire to Corrupt: Convent and Community in Medieval Wales [discusses the number of nunneries in Wales, their population, and economic condition; also considers Welsh social and cutltural attitudes toward women's sexuality and religious devotion as reflected by the Cywyddwyr poets, a group that wrote under aristocratic patronage in the fourteenth century].
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997. Celtic Studies Association of North America (CSANA) Yearbook , 40241., ( 2005):  Pages 20 - 48.
Year of Publication: 1997.

8. Record Number: 3415
Author(s): Bray, Dorothy Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman's Loss and Lamentation: Heledd's Song and "The Wife's Lament" [comparison of the two poems in which heroic women lament their fate bereft of male protection and support].
Source: Neophilologus , 79., ( 1995):  Pages 147 - 154.
Year of Publication: 1995.

9. Record Number: 516
Author(s): Hellman, Dara.
Contributor(s):
Title : Interdiction and the Imperative Feminine Redress in "Gereint ab Erbin" and "Erec et Enide"
Source: Aestel , 3., ( 1995):  Pages 19 - 33.
Year of Publication: 1995.

10. Record Number: 1644
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "Malkin" and Dafydd Ap Gwilym's "Mald Y Cwd" [this female name had disparaging associations from the thirteenth century onward ; in literature Malkin and Mald were ugly, sluttish hags].
Source: Notes and Queries , 2 (June 1995):  Pages 159 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1995.

11. Record Number: 1201
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Master John of St. Davids, Adam and Eve, and the Rose Amongst Thorns [discussion of the sources used in the two poems attributed to Master John].
Source: Studia Celtica , 29., ( 1995):  Pages 225 - 235.
Year of Publication: 1995.

12. Record Number: 4189
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Bardic Themes: The Virgin and Child, and "Ave-Eva"
Source: Medium Aevum , 63., 1 ( 1994):  Pages 17 - 33.
Year of Publication: 1994.

13. Record Number: 1238
Author(s): Aronstein, Susan.
Contributor(s):
Title : When Arthur Held Court in Caer Llion: Love, Marriage, and the Politics of Centralization in "Gereint" and "Owein"
Source: Viator , 25., ( 1994):  Pages 215 - 228.
Year of Publication: 1994.

14. Record Number: 7941
Author(s): Gruffydd, R. Geraint.
Contributor(s):
Title : Englynion y Cusan by Dafydd ap Gwilym [The author analyses a poem by the fourteenth century Welsh poet Dafydd ap Gwilym in praise of a kiss. The short article includes the text, a modern Welsh version, and an English translation. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 23., (Summer 1992):  Pages 1 - 6.
Year of Publication: 1992.

15. Record Number: 10776
Author(s): Saint Paul, Thérèse.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Forgotten Heroine in Medieval English Literature [The author seeks to identify the heroine Tegeu who is referred to in passing in the poem "Annot and Johon." Saint Paul suggests that Tegeu was a traditional Welsch character who was celebrated in stories that emphasized her devotion to her husband and her chastity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 23., (Summer 1992):  Pages 247 - 255.
Year of Publication: 1992.

16. Record Number: 8663
Author(s): Fulton, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Welsh Poems to Nuns [Among the poems of the "cywyddwyr" (medieval Welsh poets) is a sub-genre of erotic poems addressed to nuns; the speaker presents himself as a suitor while the nun takes the position of the disdainful courtly maiden. Although irreverent, these poems are not satirical and serve as genuine love songs. The five poems the author examines in this article are attributed to the fourteenth-century poet Dafydd Ap Gwilym, but the language and style of all but one of them point to a fifteenth-century composition date. The appendix transcribes these five poems in Welsh with English translations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 21., (Summer 1991):  Pages 87 - 112.
Year of Publication: 1991.

17. Record Number: 8664
Author(s): Johnston, D. R.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Erotic Poetry of the "Cywyddwyr" The author examines sexually explicit poems written by medieval Welsh poets. Some poets borrow heavily from Continental sources (such as Jean de Meun’s "Roman de la Rose" and the French pastorelle genre), but others employ distinctively Welsh literary genres (like the "llatai," a poem that features a male speaker who sends a messenger to seek the female’s favor, or the "cywydd gofyn," a poem that requests a gift). While some of the poems fulfill male desires by presenting women as sexually voracious or by suggesting that mutual enjoyment of sexual intercourse legitimates male acts of rape or violence, other poems explore what happens when the male’s desires are thwarted. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 21., (Winter 1991):  Pages 63 - 94.
Year of Publication: 1991.

18. Record Number: 12855
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Doubling and Incest in the Mabinogi [The author traces the theme of incestuously doubled identities in The Four Branches of the Mabinogi. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 65., ( 1990):  Pages 344 - 362.
Year of Publication: 1990.

19. Record Number: 12740
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Virgin Mary, Daughter of Her Son [The “mater et filia” topos, or the notion of the Virgin Mary as being simultaneously the mother and daughter of Christ, originated in the writings of late Antiquity but the theme also appears in the early poetry of Ireland and Britain. The first known reference to the topos in Ireland occurs in the seventh century Latin poem; an eleventh century poem written in the Irish language is perhaps the oldest vernacular example of the topos. The earliest example of the topos in Welsh poetry probably dates from around 1400. In all these instances, poets borrow and adapt ideas about the Virgin Mary from Continental sources like sermons, Church teachings, or poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Études Celtiques , 27., ( 1990):  Pages 267 - 283.
Year of Publication: 1990.

20. Record Number: 12730
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Blessed Virgin's Joys and Sorrows [Based upon a comparison with analogous material in English, Latin, and Anglo-Norman texts, the author establishes the dating and attribution of three religious poems (two in Welsh and one in Irish) that concern the Virgin's joys and sorrows. Although the manuscripts attribute the three poems to three thirteenth century poets, the textual evidence indicates that they were actually written by three entirely different poets in the fourteenth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 19., (Summer 1990):  Pages 41 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1990.