Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


30 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 14649
Author(s): Rando, Daniela.
Contributor(s):
Title : Libri e letture per la vita eremetica: un esempio al femminile dal Veneto [Pious women from Venice occasionally became hermits near Treviso. We can trace some of their reading through the will of Caterina Centania, who founded the Hieronymites of Santa Maria della Rocca and left books to the prior of a monastery near Treviso. Included among these vernacular works of piety are texts in Italian, including in the regional dialect. Some are translations of well-known devotional texts, including pious poetry and Marian texts. The article appendix presents the will of Caterina Centania (1467). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Chiesa, vita religiosa, societa nel Medioevo italiano: Studi offerti a Giuseppina De Sandre Gasparini.   Edited by Mariaclara Rossi and Gian Maria Varanini .   Herder, 2005. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 539 - 553.
Year of Publication: 2005.

2. Record Number: 20781
Author(s): Kovacs, Lenke
Contributor(s):
Title : The Staging of the "Ludus de assumptione beatae Mariae virginis" (cod. 960, University Library, Innsbruck) [Describes the variations of stage settings and performance venues used for Assumption plays, emphasizing how practical concerns (such as needing to silence the audience) were incorporated into play scripts. Examines the relationship between the Virgin Mary and the Bride in the Song of Songs, and the depiction of Jews and Jerusalem. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 25 - 34.
Year of Publication: 2005.

3. Record Number: 10826
Author(s): Simons, Walter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Staining the Speech of Things Divine: The Uses of Literacy in Medieval Beguine Communities [The author examines different kinds of evidence including vernacular texts written by Beguines, wills that bequeathed manuscripts to or from Beguines, and daily activities of Beguines involving the written word. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 85 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 10827
Author(s): Hemptinne, Thérèse.de
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading, Writing, and Devotional Practices: Lay and Religious Women and the Written Word in the Low Countries (1350-1550) [The author argues in part that manuscripts in the vernacular served as a means of connection among female relatives and friends, both urban laywomen and those in religious life (Beguines as well as nuns). Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 111 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 10828
Author(s): Desplenter, Youri.
Contributor(s):
Title : Songs of Praise for the "Illiterate": Latin Hymns in Middle Dutch Prose Translation [The author focuses on a group of manuscripts which provide vernacular translations of breviary hymns. Desplenter argues that the manuscripts' intended users were mostly women, both Franciscan tertiaries and canonesses of the Windesheim Chapter. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Voice of Silence: Women's Literacy in a Men's Church.   Edited by Thérèse de Hemptinne and María Eugenia Góngora Medieval Church Studies .   Brepols, 2004. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 127 - 142.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 11094
Author(s): Watson, Nicholas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ancrene Wisse, Religious Reform and the Late Middle Ages [The author examines later Middle English texts that borrowed heavily from the "Ancrene Wisse." For the most part their authors were interested in adapting the anchoritic life for devout lay men and women. In some cases the texts have a pronounced puritan streak. The "Ancrene Wisse's" theme of living a life of perfection appealed to many reformist authors in fourteenth century England. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Companion to "Ancrene Wisse."   Edited by Yoko Wada .   D. S. Brewer, 2003. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 197 - 226.
Year of Publication: 2003.

7. Record Number: 10906
Author(s): Hamilton, Tracy Chapman.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queenship and Kinship in the French "Bible moralisée": The Example of Blanche of Castile and Vienna ÖNB 2554 [The author argues that the manuscript was commissioned by Blanche possibly during the early period of her regency. The repeated images of childbirth and Sainte Église in the illuminations emphasize Blanche's particular rights as mother and authorized regent. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Capetian Women.   Edited by Kathleen Nolan .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2003. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 177 - 208.
Year of Publication: 2003.

8. Record Number: 9508
Author(s): Powell, Morgan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Translating Scripture for "Ma Dame de Champagne": The Old French "Paraphrase" of Psalm 44 ("Eructavit") [The author analyzes the Old French translation of Psalm Forty-Four made for Marie de Champagne. The poet sets his wedding song for Christ and his bride, Holy Church, within the context of the secular court which is seen as the equivalent of heaven. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 83 - 103.
Year of Publication: 2002.

9. Record Number: 9511
Author(s): Wiberg Pedersen, Else Marie
Contributor(s):
Title : Can God Speak in the Vernacular? On Beatrice of Nazareth's Flemish Exposition of the Love for God [The author examines the "Seven manieren van heiliger Minnen," a vernacular text written by Beatrice, a prioress of the Cistercian convent of Nazareth in present day Belgium near Antwerp. Wiberg Pedersen also looks at Beatrice's "vita," written in Latin by an unknown monk. The monk also translated her "Seven manieren" text into Latin for inclusion with the "vita." Wiberg Pedersen argues that the Church was frequently uncomfortable with women who wrote theological texts, particularly in the vernacular. Nevertheless Beatrice and other "mulieres religiosae" found various orthodox outlets for their writings. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Vernacular Spirit: Essays on Medieval Religious Literature.   Edited by Renate Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Duncan Robertson, and Nancy Bradley Warren .   The New Middle Ages series. Palgrave, 2002. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 185 - 208.
Year of Publication: 2002.

10. Record Number: 5455
Author(s): Renevey, Denis.
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction--Female Vernacular Theology [defined by the authors as "this subcategory embodies religious works either written and performed by women, written for women, and/or, to a lesser degree, representing women." (Page 5).].
Source: Writing Religious Women: Female Spiritual and Textual Practices in Late Medieval England.   Edited by Denis Renevey and Christiania Whitehead .   University of Toronto Press, 2000. European Medieval Drama , 9., ( 2005):  Pages 1 - 5.
Year of Publication: 2000.

11. Record Number: 4883
Author(s): Cornish, Alison.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Lady Asks: The Gender of Vulgarization in Late Medieval Italy
Source: PMLA: Publications of the Modern Language Association of America (Full Text via JSTOR) 115, 2 (March 2000): 166-180. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2000.

12. Record Number: 5454
Author(s): Salamone, Nadia Cannata.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Making of the Italian Literary Canon [The author explores women's roles as the audience for literature in the vernacular written in courtly circles].
Source: Women in Italian Renaissance Culture and Society.   Edited by Letizia Panizza .   European Humanities Research Centre, University of Oxford, 2000.  Pages 498 - 512.
Year of Publication: 2000.

13. Record Number: 4478
Author(s): Fenster, Thelma.
Contributor(s):
Title : Perdre son latin: Christine de Pizan and Vernacular Humanism [The author suggests that rather than argue over Christine's command of Latin, scholars should recognize the contributions she made to French prose].
Source: Christine de Pizan and the Categories of Difference.   Edited by Marilynn Desmond .   University of Minnesota Press, 1998.  Pages 91 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1998.

14. Record Number: 5435
Author(s): Bishop, Louise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dame Study and Women's Literacy ["Langland's poem negotiates the discourse of reading, recognizing the competition between the accepted female discursive mode and the call to social activism: 'Piers Plowman' embodies that competition in the figure of Study. As wife of Wit, Study dramatizes the competition for a reader's conscience, and traces in her disquisition the readerly paths to the heart. The one thing that recuperates the social experience of reading is its communal and sensual component: texts are read, heard, and felt. Study's emphasis on charity reveals a bold, feminized component of the discourse of social activism as antidote, if you will, to the constructed female reader of texts of affective piety." (Page 112)].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 97 - 115.
Year of Publication: 1998.

15. Record Number: 2267
Author(s): Ehrenschwendtner, Marie Luise.
Contributor(s):
Title : Puellae litteratae: The Use of the Vernacular in the Dominican Convents of Southern Germany
Source: Medieval Women in Their Communities.   Edited by Diane Watt .   University of Toronto Press, 1997. Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 49 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1997.

16. Record Number: 2958
Author(s): Green, Monica H.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Handlist of Latin and Vernacular Manuscripts of the So-Called "Trotula" Texts. Part II: The Vernacular Translations and Latin Re-Writings [describes in detail all twenty-four known medieval vernacular translations or Latin re-writings of the Trotula texts; identifies three translations into Dutch, five into English, seven into French, three into German, one into Hebrew, one into Irish, two into Italian plus one Latin prose rendition and one Latin verse rendition; includes information on editions of these texts where available].
Source: Scriptorium , 51., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 80 - 104.
Year of Publication: 1997.

17. Record Number: 1565
Author(s): Tarvers, Josephine K.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Alleged Illiteracy of Margery Kempe: A Reconsideration of the Evidence
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 11., ( 1996):  Pages 113 - 124. Proceedings of the Twenty-First Annual Conference of the Southeastern Medieval Association
Year of Publication: 1996.

18. Record Number: 820
Author(s): Chavasse, Ruth.
Contributor(s):
Title : Latin Lay Piety and Vernacular Lay Piety in Word and Image: Venice, 1471- Early 1500s [devotion to the Virgin Mary].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 3 (Sept. 1996):  Pages 319 - 342.
Year of Publication: 1996.

19. Record Number: 714
Author(s): McGinn, Bernard.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Changing Shape of Late Medieval Mysticism [themes discussed include connections between men and women in religion, Latin and the vernaculars, and the world and the cloister].
Source: Church History (Full Text via JSTOR) 65, 2 (June 1996): 197-219. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

20. Record Number: 702
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Listen Now All and Understand: Adaptation of Hagiographical Material for Vernacular Audiences in the Old English Lives of St. Margaret [contrasts a straightforward narrative with a version that emphasizes an affective spirituality].
Source: Speculum (Full Text via JSTOR) 71, 1 (Jan. 1996): 27-42. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1996.

21. Record Number: 1584
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Don't Ask, Don't Tell: The Wife of Bath and Vernacular Translations [the Wife of Bath's "Prologue" amd "Tale" promote the status of the vernacular and acknowledge the role female audiences play in the translations of "authoritative" texts like Trotula].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 8., 1 (Spring 1996):  Pages 97 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1996.

22. Record Number: 1667
Author(s): Pickens, Rupert T.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France's Bestiary: Acculturation in the Anglo-Norman Court [International Courtly Literature Society. Eighth Triennial Congress. Queen's University of Belfast, July- August 1995].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 8 - 9.
Year of Publication: 1996.

23. Record Number: 1671
Author(s): Amer, Sahar
Contributor(s):
Title : Meaning at the Juncture of Text and Manuscript: The Case of Marie de France's Fables [1995 Convention of the Modern Language Association. Chicago, December 26-30, 1995].
Source: Le Cygne: Bulletin of the International Marie de France Society: Abstracts, Notes, and Queries , 2., (April 1996):  Pages 12 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1996.

24. Record Number: 455
Author(s): van Dijk, Willibrord- Christian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Une Traduction Française du XVeSiècle de la Vie de Sainte Claire de Thomas de Celano
Source: Laurentianum , 36., 40180 ( 1995):  Pages 3 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1995.

25. Record Number: 368
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesca da Rimini and Dante's Women Readers
Source: Women, the Book and the Worldly: Selected Proceedings of the St. Hilda's Conference, 1993. Volume 2. [Volume 1: Women, the Book, and the Godly].   Edited by Lesley Smith and Jane H. M. Taylor .   D.S.Brewer, 1995. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 3 (Sept. 1996):  Pages 71 - 83.
Year of Publication: 1995.

26. Record Number: 3514
Author(s): Gill, Katherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Production of Religious Literature in the Vernacular, 1300-1500
Source: Creative Women in Medieval and Early Modern Italy: A Religious and Artistic Renaissance.   Edited by E. Ann Matter and John Coakley .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1994. Laurentianum , 36., 40180 ( 1995):  Pages 64 - 104.
Year of Publication: 1994.

27. Record Number: 4333
Author(s): Copeland, Rita.
Contributor(s):
Title : Why Women Can't Read: Medieval Hermeneutics, Statutory Law, and the Lollard Heresy Trials
Source: Representing Women: Law, Literature, and Feminism.   Edited by Susan Sage Heinzelman and Zipporah Batshaw Wiseman .   Duke University Press, 1994. Laurentianum , 36., 40180 ( 1995):  Pages 253 - 286.
Year of Publication: 1994.

28. Record Number: 5511
Author(s): McGinn, Bernard.
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction: Meister Eckhart and the Beguines in the Context of Vernacular Theology
Source: Meister Eckhart and the Beguine Mystics: Hadewijch of Brabant, Mechthild of Magdeburg, and Marguerite Porete.   Edited by Bernard McGinn .   Continuum, 1994. Laurentianum , 36., 40180 ( 1995):  Pages 1 - 14.
Year of Publication: 1994.

29. Record Number: 11068
Author(s): Nichols, Stephen G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France’s Commonplaces [In her lais, Marie espouses the low culture of oral tradition and Breton folk tales over the literate Latin tradition, which was held in high esteem. The poetic technique of her lais combines classical rhetoric and popular narrative elements (like the use of vernacular and common proverbs). Her innovative use of commonplaces departs from Classical traditions and reforms the attitudes toward women and sexuality expressed in canonical Latin poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 134-148. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

30. Record Number: 12730
Author(s): Breeze, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Blessed Virgin's Joys and Sorrows [Based upon a comparison with analogous material in English, Latin, and Anglo-Norman texts, the author establishes the dating and attribution of three religious poems (two in Welsh and one in Irish) that concern the Virgin's joys and sorrows. Although the manuscripts attribute the three poems to three thirteenth century poets, the textual evidence indicates that they were actually written by three entirely different poets in the fourteenth century. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Cambridge Medieval Celtic Studies , 19., (Summer 1990):  Pages 41 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1990.