Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


1270 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 37749
Author(s): Cooper, Kate
Contributor(s):
Title : The Heroine and the Historian: Procopius of Caesarea on the Troubled Reign of Queen Amalasuentha
Source: A Companion to Ostrogothic Italy   Edited by Jonathan J. Arnold, M. Shane Bjornlie, Kristina Sessa .   Brill, 2016.  Pages 296 - 315.
Year of Publication: 2016.

2. Record Number: 36620
Author(s): Ward, Jennifer
Contributor(s):
Title : Elizabeth de Burgh, Lady of Clare (1295-1360): Household and Other Records
Source: Elizabeth de Burgh, Lady of Clare (1295-1360): Household and Other Records. Jennifer Ward .   Boydell Press, 2014.  Pages 1 - 154.
Year of Publication: 2014.

3. Record Number: 32709
Author(s): Clark, David
Contributor(s):
Title : Heroic Homosociality and Homophobia in the Helgi Poems
Source: Revisiting the Poetic Edda: Essays on Old Norse Heroic Legend.   Edited by Paul Acker and Carolyne Larrington .   Routledge, 2013.  Pages 11 - 27.
Year of Publication: 2013.

4. Record Number: 38478
Author(s): [no author]
Contributor(s):
Title : La Prammatica sulle vesti delle donne fiorentine (Firenze 1343-1345)
Source: Draghi rossi e querce azzurre: elenchi descrittivi di abiti di lusso (Firenze 1343-1345).   Edited by Laurence Gérard-Marchant .   SISMEL, 2013.  Pages 1 - 516.
Year of Publication: 2013.

5. Record Number: 29056
Author(s): Burger, Glenn
Contributor(s):
Title : In the Merchant's Bedchamber
Source: Thresholds of Medieval Visual Culture: Liminal Spaces.   Edited by Elina Gertsman and Jill Stevenson .   Boydell Press, 2012.  Pages 239 - 259.
Year of Publication: 2012.

6. Record Number: 32711
Author(s): Fridriksdóttir, Jóhanna Katrín
Contributor(s):
Title : "Gerðit Hon...sem konor aðrar": Women and Subversion in Eddic Heroic Poetry
Source: Revisiting the Poetic Edda: Essays on Old Norse Heroic Legend.   Edited by Paul Acker and Carolyne Larrington .   Routledge, 2012.  Pages 117 - 135.
Year of Publication: 2012.

7. Record Number: 29190
Author(s): Kupfer, Marcia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Abraham Circumcises Himself: A Scene at the Endgame of Jewish Utility to Christian Art
Source: Judaism and Christian Art: Aesthetic Anxieties from the Catacombs to Colonialism.   Edited by Herbert L. Kessler and David Nirenberg .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 2011.  Pages 143 - 182.
Year of Publication: 2011.

8. Record Number: 29256
Author(s): Rowe, Nina,
Contributor(s):
Title : Rethinking "Ecclesia" and "Synagoga" in the Thirteenth Century [The author argues that the representation of "Synagoga" in the sculptural programs at Bamberg, Reims, and Strasbourg was meant to project a view of Judaism as subordinate to "Ecclesia" triumphant and to the kingly rulers on the portals. Title note suppl
Source: Gothic Art and Thought in the Later Medieval Period: Essays in Honor of Willibald Sauerländer.   Edited by Colum Hourihane .   Index of Christian Art, Department of Art and Archaeology, Princeton University in association with Penn State University Press, 2011.  Pages 264 - 291.
Year of Publication: 2011.

9. Record Number: 30105
Author(s): Laszlovszky, József
Contributor(s):
Title : "Fama sanctitatis" and the Emergence of St. Margaret's Cult in the Rural Countryside: The Canonization Process and Social Mobility in Thirteenth-Century Hungary [The author analyzes a family's testimony in the canonization process of Saint Margaret of Hungary in 1276. The mother found her infant son dead in bed next to her and prayed to Saint Margaret for help. A few hours later he came back to life. Laszlovsz
Source: Promoting the Saints: Cults and Their Contexts from Late Antiquity until the Early Modern Period. Essays in Honor of Gábor Klaniczay for His 60th Birthday.   Edited by Ottó Gecser, József Laszlovszky, Balázs Nagy, Marcell Sebok, and Katalin Szende .   Central European University Press, 2011.  Pages 103 - 123.
Year of Publication: 2011.

10. Record Number: 27565
Author(s): Garver, Valerie L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Weaving Words in Silk: Women and Inscribed Bands in the Carolingian World [The author analyzes three silk woven bands surviving from Carolingian Germany: Witgar’s belt, Ailbecunda band, and the Speyer band. Witgar’s belt was a gift from Emma, wife of King Louis the German, to Witgar, the future bishop of Augsburg. In these three cases women not only donated high-status silk inscribed bands, but evidence also points to women as weavers of the tablet bands. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 33 - 56.
Year of Publication: 2010.

11. Record Number: 27567
Author(s): Sayers, William
Contributor(s):
Title : Flax and Linen in Walter of Bibbesworth’s Thirteenth-Century French Treatise for English Housewives [Walter of Bibbesworth wrote a handbook for English-speaking landowners giving the French terminology for estate management. The reader he addressed was the “mesuer,” or“housewif,” who oversaw many of the processes detailed in his book. Sayers analyzes the section on growing and harvesting flax, processing and spinning the thread, and weaving linen. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 111 - 126.
Year of Publication: 2010.

12. Record Number: 27568
Author(s): Stanford, Charlotte A. ,
Contributor(s):
Title : Donations from the Body for the Soul: Apparel, Devotion, and Status in Late Medieval Strasbourg [The author analyzes evidence of lay people’s contributions to the building and services of Strasbourg’s cathedral as recorded in the “Book of Donors” from the early fourteenth century to 1521. Many people contributed clothing and related items, both for resale and for use in liturgical services. Stanford notes women’s participation as donors and the varieties of women’s clothing and ornaments given as gifts. She underlines the personal nature of many women’s gifts including elaborate linens decorated with gold and silk destined for the Virgin’s chapel. The appendices include a glossary of apparel-related terms in the “Book of Donors” both in Latin and in German (pages 199-205). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 173 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2010.

13. Record Number: 27613
Author(s): Gaudette, Helen A.,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Spending Power of a Crusader Queen: Melisende of Jerusalem [The author analyzes three projects which Melisende supported in part to increase public support for her rule: Bethgibelin Castle, the women's monastery of Bethany, and the covered market street in Jerusalem called "Malquisinat" (literally the Street of Bad Cooking). Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women and Wealth in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Theresa Earenfight The New Middle Ages. .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 135 - 148.
Year of Publication: 2010.

14. Record Number: 27618
Author(s): Farina, Lara
Contributor(s):
Title : Money, Books and Prayers: Anchoresses and Exchange in Thirteenth-century England [The author explores texts in the “Wooing Group,” analyzing the language of bargaining and exchange in the relationships the anchoress has both with Christ and her spiritual adviser. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Women and Wealth in Late Medieval Europe.   Edited by Theresa Earenfight The New Middle Ages. .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 171 - 185.
Year of Publication: 2010.

15. Record Number: 28344
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Ross, James Bruce, translator
Title : The Faculty of Medicine of Paris vs. Jacoba Felicie [Account of a trial in which the Faculty of Medicine of Paris accused a female healer of illicit practice. Includes arguments that Jacoba advanced in her defense. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Medicine: A Reader.   Edited by Faith Wallis Readings in Medieval Civilizations and Cultures, 15.   University of Toronto Press, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 366 - 369.
Year of Publication: 2010.

16. Record Number: 28345
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Wallis, Faith, translator
Title : Jewish Doctors: The Case of Provence: A Jewish Doctor is Accused of Abortion and Malpractice [Court record of the case against Isaac, a surgeon, accused of giving a Christian woman an abortifacient. Includes Isaac’s defense with testimony from several witnesses. The defendant was found guilty and had to pay a fine of fifty pounds. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Medicine: A Reader.   Edited by Faith Wallis Readings in Medieval Civilizations and Cultures, 15.   University of Toronto Press, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 381 - 383.
Year of Publication: 2010.

17. Record Number: 28346
Author(s): Constantine the African, ,
Contributor(s): Wallis, Faith, translator
Title : Medicalizing Sex: Constantine the African [Constantine came from North Africa and brought Arabic medical texts with him to Italy. He translated or adapted his book, “On Sexual Intercourse”, from Arabic sources. He discusses issues from a medical point of view and includes many remedies for sexual problems. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Medicine: A Reader.   Edited by Faith Wallis Readings in Medieval Civilizations and Cultures, 15.   University of Toronto Press, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 511 - 523.
Year of Publication: 2010.

18. Record Number: 28445
Author(s): Kostick, Conor.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eleanor of Aquitaine and the Women of the Second Crusade
Source: Medieval Italy, Medieval and Early Modern Women: Essays in Honour of Christine Meek.   Edited by Conor Kostick .   Four Courts Press, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 195 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2010.

19. Record Number: 28447
Author(s): Simms, Katharine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bardic Poems of Consolation to Bereaved Irish Ladies
Source: Medieval Italy, Medieval and Early Modern Women: Essays in Honour of Christine Meek.   Edited by Conor Kostick .   Four Courts Press, 2010. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 6., ( 2010):  Pages 220 - 230.
Year of Publication: 2010.

20. Record Number: 29907
Author(s): Berman, Constance Hoffman
Contributor(s):
Title : Two Medieval Women’s Property and Religious Benefactions in France: Eleanor of Vermandois and Blanche of Castile
Source: Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 151 - 182.
Year of Publication: 2010.

21. Record Number: 24047
Author(s): Wells, Scott
Contributor(s):
Title : The Politics of Gender and Ethnicity in East Francia: The Case of Gandersheim, ca. 850-950 [The author argues that the women’s community at the monastery of Gandersheim was important because it conveyed multiple meanings for the Liudolfing-Saxon dynasty during a period of shifting familial and ethnic politics. During this time variations in royal support coincided with the monastery’s success or failure at articulating the ruling dynasty’s political identity. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 113 - 135.
Year of Publication: 2009.

22. Record Number: 27573
Author(s): Sinkevic, Ida,
Contributor(s):
Title : Fresco-Icons in Royal Portraits of Queen Tamar
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 26 - 26.
Year of Publication: 2009.

23. Record Number: 27576
Author(s): Georgiadou, Sofia,
Contributor(s):
Title : The Architectural Projects of Nikephoros I Komnenos Doukas (1266/8-1296/8) and Anna Palaiologina in Arta, Epiros
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference , 35., ( 2009):  Pages 83 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2009.

24. Record Number: 28083
Author(s): Meconi, David Vincent,
Contributor(s):
Title : Traveling Without Moving: Love as an Ecstatic Union in Plotinus, Augustine, and Dante [Plotinus thought only the desire for union with the one mattered, and Augustine did not want any human attachments to take away from the desire for God. Dante, however, thought the beloved could manifest God's essence. Good love was embodied in Beatrice; bad love in Francesca da Rimini, who still was self-obsessed in hell. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Mediterranean Studies , 18., ( 2009):  Pages 1 - 23.
Year of Publication: 2009.

25. Record Number: 28318
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Jefferson, Lisa, translator
Title : “Fees: Alice Bridenelle, the daughter of Thomas Picot, the son of John Picot, the son of Nicholas Picot, sometime mercer of London, for a fee to make her free – 20s.” [1427-1428, folio 94v.] [Alice Bridenelle is the only woman (apart from widows) noted in these records as being admitted to the Mercers’ Company. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: The Medieval Account Books of the Mercers of London: An Edition and Translation. Volume 1   Edited by Lisa Jefferson .   Ashgate, 2009. Mediterranean Studies , 18., ( 2009):  Pages 384 - 385.
Year of Publication: 2009.

26. Record Number: 28319
Author(s):
Contributor(s): Jefferson, Lisa, translator
Title : “This ordinance was revised during the term of office of the aforesaid wardens… And it is fully agreed that all widows of the mistery who wish to live as a feme-sole and carry on the trade with their household, who are under the governance of the mistery, or those who are with husbands who are men of the same mistery and under its governance, shall enjoy the full benefit of the aforesaid ordinance.” [1417, folio 71v.]
Source: The Medieval Account Books of the Mercers of London: An Edition and Translation. Volume 1   Edited by Lisa Jefferson .   Ashgate, 2009. Mediterranean Studies , 18., ( 2009):  Pages 296 - 299.
Year of Publication: 2009.

27. Record Number: 24052
Author(s): Cuffel, Alexandra
Contributor(s):
Title : The Matter of Others: Menstrual Blood and Uncontrolled Semen in Thirteenth-Century Kabbalists' Polemic against Christians, "Bad" Jews, and Muslims [The author argues that Kabbalist writers viewed sexual impurities and intercourse with non-Jewish women with alarm. These sins made Jewish men the equivalent of menstruating women in terms of the pollution they brought their families and the Jewish community. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 249 - 284.
Year of Publication: 2009.

28. Record Number: 24050
Author(s): Smith, Kathryn A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Book, Body, and the Construction of Self in the Taymouth Hours [The author analyzes miniatures and bas de page illustrations in a book of hours made for an English royal woman in the 1330s. Smith finds evidence of models of appropriate devout behavior for the laity. The portrait of the book owner at prayer during mass shows her with hands extended and the book of hours at her side. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Viator , 41., 2 ( 2010):  Pages 173 - 204.
Year of Publication: 2009.

29. Record Number: 22417
Author(s): Izbicki, Thomas M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Failed Censures: Ecclesiastical Regulation of Women’s Clothing in Late Medieval Italy [Ecclesiastical efforts to regulate vanity of dress were few in late medieval Italy. Most significant was a constitution written by Cardinal Latino Malabranca intended to limit display of flesh and waste of cloth. By the fourteenth century compromises were being made in the enforcement of this decree, and new issues involving the wearing of jewelry and other ornaments were being addressed. By the fifteenth century, sumptuary legislation was largely left to the Italian communes, although some of the clergy still advocated strict measures against vain dress and ornamentation. The appendices include: Appendix 3.1 Cardinal Latino Malabranca's Constitution on Women's dress (1279); Appendix 3.2 Cardinal Bertrand du Poujet's Modification of Cardinal Latino's Constitution (ca. 1327) ; Appendix 3.3 The Constitution of Antonio d'Orso Biliotti, Bishop of Florence (ca. 1310). Title note submitted by the author.]
Source:   Edited by Robin Netherton; Gale R. Owen-Crocker Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 5., ( 2009):  Pages 37 - 53.
Year of Publication: 2009.

30. Record Number: 24044
Author(s): Roukis-Stern, Christina,
Contributor(s):
Title : A Tale of Two Dioceses: Prologues as Letters in the "Vitae" Authored by Jacques de Vitry and Thomas de Cantimpré [The author analyzes the prefaces of five “vitae” (the life of Marie d’Oignies by Jacques and the other four (a supplement to the life of Marie d’Oignies, Christina Mirabilis , Marguerite d’Ypres, and Lutgard ) written by Thomas) looking particularly at the network of relationships the hagiographers had with holy women and with other clerics. Jacques dedicated his “vita” to Bishop Fulk of Toulouse but emphasized the superiority of Liège and its holy women over the arid and heretical diocese of Toulouse. Roukis-Stern observes in Thomas a number of anxieties and a particular need for close friendships. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 5., ( 2009):  Pages 33 - 47.
Year of Publication: 2009.

31. Record Number: 24048
Author(s): Berman, Constance Hoffman
Contributor(s):
Title : Noble Women's Power as Reflected in the Foundations of Cistercian Houses for Nuns in Thirteenth-Century Northern France: Port-Royal, les Clairets, Moncey, Lieu and Eau-lez-Chartres [The author examines five Cistercian female houses supported by Matilda of Brunswick, the Countess of the Perche; Matilda of Garlande, Lady of Marly; and Isabelle, Countess of Chartres with the help of her daughter, Matilda of Amboise. Berman argues that these actions reveal the power and authority women exercised and need to be incorporated into the historical narrative. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Negotiating Community and Difference in Medieval Europe: Gender, Power, Patronage, and the Authority of Religion in Latin Christendom.   Edited by Katherine Allen Smith and Scott Wells Studies in the History of Christian Traditions .   Brill, 2009. Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 5., ( 2009):  Pages 137 - 149.
Year of Publication: 2009.

32. Record Number: 20922
Author(s): Schüle, Wolfgang
Contributor(s):
Title : Erzbischof Johann von Esztergom und der Mord an der Königin Gertrud im Jahre 1213
Source: Western Canon Law and Eastern Churches: Thirteenth International Congress of Medieval Canon Law. Abstracts. , ( 2008):  Pages 30 - 31.
Year of Publication: 2008.

33. Record Number: 28190
Author(s): Chiesa, Paolo
Contributor(s):
Title : Una donna in pericolo. Un miracolo (napoletano?) inedito di san Samonas di Edessa
Source: Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 97 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2008.

34. Record Number: 20601
Author(s): Stuard, Susan Mosher
Contributor(s):
Title : Satisfying the Laws: The "Legenda" of Maria of Venice [Susan Mosher Stuard analyzes the "Vita" of Maria Sturion written by her confessor, Thomas Caffarini. Thomas had been given the task of writing a rule for Dominican penitents, lay people who lived a religious life without vows (and also known as tertiaries or third orders). Maria Sturion (or Maria of Venice) had been abandoned by her young husband and led a religious life at the home of her parents; Caffarini developed a close relationship with her as confessor and teacher. He saw Maria's "vita" as a model that other wealthy, young Venetian women could follow. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Law and the Illicit in Medieval Europe.   Edited by Ruth Mazo Karras, Joel Kaye, and E. Ann Matter .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 2008. Mediterranean Studies , 18., ( 2009):  Pages 197 - 210.
Year of Publication: 2008.

35. Record Number: 19088
Author(s): Goldfrank, David M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sisterhood Just Might be Powerful: The Testament-Rule of Elena Devochkina [A testament-rule survives for the women’s monastery of Novodevichi in Moscow. It was written by the monastery’s superior, Elena Devochkina, around the middle of the sixteenth century. Goldfrank argues that Devochkina’s rule for her nuns is unusual in the emphasis she places on their role in praying to ensure new heirs for Ivan IV and his younger brother. The article concludes with an English language translation of the testament-rule. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Russian History , 34., 40182 (Spring-Summer-Fall-Winter 2007):  Pages 189 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2007.

36. Record Number: 20867
Author(s): Cooke, Jessica
Contributor(s):
Title : De Catherina Beata da Bologna di Sabadino degli Arienti (1472) [In his “Gynevera,” Sabadino degli Arienti wrote a life of Caterina Vigri of Bologna. It was heavily paraphrased from a life by Suor Illuminata Bembo. Sabadino degli Arienti wrote the account as part of a collection of lives which he dedicated to Ginevra Sforza Bentivoglio, a member of Bologna’s ruling family. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 14., ( 2007):  Pages 231 - 241.
Year of Publication: 2007.

37. Record Number: 19528
Author(s): Dabrowska, Malgorzata
Contributor(s):
Title : Ought One to Marry? Manuel II Palaiologos' Point of View [The Emperor Manuel wrote a dialog on marriage between 1394 and 1397. His aim was to emphasize how important inheritance was for the imperial family. Dabrowska suggests that the emperor later revised the text to encourage his own son to marry. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 31., 2 ( 2007):  Pages 146 - 156.
Year of Publication: 2007.

38. Record Number: 18397
Author(s): Twomey, Lesley K
Contributor(s):
Title : Poverty and Richly Decorated Garments: A Re-Evaluation of Their Significance in the "Vita Christi" of Isabel de Villena
Source: Medieval Clothing and Textiles , 3., ( 2007):  Pages 119 - 134.
Year of Publication: 2007.

39. Record Number: 20336
Author(s): Bertini Malgiarini, Patrizia and Ugo Vignuzzi
Contributor(s):
Title : Matilde a Helfta, Melchiade in Umbria (e oltre): un antico volgarizzamento umbro del "Liber specialis gratiae" [Mechthild von Hackeborn's "Liber specialis gratiae" was translated into Italian in the 15th or 16th century. It probably was made for nuns. The translation renames Mechthild "Melchiadis," as do other non-German versions. The appendix provides a compariso
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 14., ( 2007):  Pages 291 - 307.
Year of Publication: 2006.

40. Record Number: 20339
Author(s): Ricci, Alessio
Contributor(s):
Title : Recorsivita e semplicita delle "visioni" di Francesca Romana: su alcuni aspetti sintattici e testuali del discorso mistico [The Latin translation of Giovanni Mattioti's collection of evidence for the sanctity of Frances of Rome leaves out the flavor of the Italian original. The iconography of Frances' visions is described, but some of her less tactful remarks also are exclude
Source: Dire l'ineffabile: Caterina da Siena e il linguaggio della mistica.   Edited by Lino Leonardi and Pietro Trifone .   Edizioni del Galluzzo, 2006. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 231 - 255.
Year of Publication: 2006.

41. Record Number: 20474
Author(s): Donahue, Charles, Jr
Contributor(s):
Title : Johannes Faventinus on Marriage (with an Appendix Revisiting the Question of the Dating of Alexander III's Marriage Decretals) [Two ideas of marriage coexisted in the 12th century. The canonist Gratian favored consummation as the decisive element in matrimony. Peter Lombard, a theologian, emphasized consent. The canonist Johannes Faventinus, whose teachings may have helped mold the influential decrees of Pope Alexander III, accepted Peter Lombard's distinction of a promise to wed and words of consent in the present tense. Consummation was equated in Faventinus' opinion with consent in the present tense. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Medieval Church Law and the Origins of the Western Legal Tradition: A Tribute to Kenneth Pennington.   Edited by Wolfgang P. Müller and Mary E. Sommar .   Catholic University of America Press, 2006. French Historical Studies , 29., 4 (Fall 2006):  Pages 179 - 197.
Year of Publication: 2006.

42. Record Number: 15840
Author(s): Weddle, Saundra.
Contributor(s):
Title : Identity and Alliance: Urban Presence, Spatial Privilege, and Florentine Renaissance Convents [The author analyses the locations and functions of women's monasteries in late medieval and early modern Florence. Weddle argues that architectural spaces carried multiple meanings. Womens' monasteries were places of spiritual work, but they also could convey meanings related to patronage and politics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Renaissance Florence: A Social History.   Edited by Roger J. Crum and John T. Paoletti .   Cambridge University Press, 2006. Hagiographica: Rivista di agiografia e biografia della società internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino/ Journal of Hagiography and Biography of Società Internazionale per lo studio del Medioevo Latino , 14., ( 2007):  Pages 394 - 412.
Year of Publication: 2006.

43. Record Number: 11759
Author(s): Hayum, Andrée
Contributor(s):
Title : A Renaissance Audience Considered: The Nuns at S. Apollonia and Castagno's "Last Supper" [The author explores the possible meanings of the Castagno fresco for the nuns who commissioned the work for their refectory in the monastery of Santa Apollonia in Florence. Hayum notes Castagno's dramatic effects in the scale of figures and the spatial illusion. This kind of immediacy fits with the numerous decoration in the monastery representing nuns recieving blessings from Saint Apollonia and praying before Christ on the crucifix. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Art Bulletin , 88., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 243 - 266.
Year of Publication: 2006.

44. Record Number: 20779
Author(s): Meyer, Mati
Contributor(s):
Title : The Levite's Concubine: Imaging the Marginal Woman in Byzantine Society [Provides comparative discussion of different representations of the rape of the concubine within the corpus of illuminated Byzantine manuscripts; extrapolates on what these different representations -particularly of clothing--reveal about contemporary clergy's attitudes towards the concepts of women, sexuality, and the function of marriage. Title note supplied by Feminae].
Source: Studies in Iconography , 27., ( 2006):  Pages 45 - 76.
Year of Publication: 2006.

45. Record Number: 16302
Author(s): Eichhorn-Mulligan, Amy C.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anatomy of Power and the Miracle of Kingship: The Female Body of Sovereignty in a Medieval Irish Kingship Tale
Source: Speculum , 81., 4 (October 2006):  Pages 1014 - 1054.
Year of Publication: 2006.

46. Record Number: 20730
Author(s): Mecham, June L
Contributor(s):
Title : Breaking Old Habits: Recent Research on Women, Spirituality, and the Arts in the Middle Ages