Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


16 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 7835
Author(s): Gilmore, Gloria Thomas.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France's "Bisclavret": What the Werewolf Will and Will Not Wear ["This chapter will attempt to unravel that tangled tension in the story of 'Bisclavret,' where there are two opposing functions of clothing: to confine in a social role or identity imposed from without , or to express a self-definition, chosen or generated from within." Page 67.].
Source: Encountering Medieval Textiles and Dress: Objects, Texts, Images.   Edited by Désirée G. Koslin and Janet E. Snyder .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2002.  Pages 67 - 84.
Year of Publication: 2002.

2. Record Number: 6302
Author(s): Schnyder, Mireille.
Contributor(s):
Title : Die Entdeckung des Begehrens: Das Märe von der halben Birne
Source: Beiträge zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache und Literatur , 122., ( 2000):  Pages 263 - 278.
Year of Publication: 2000.

3. Record Number: 6303
Author(s): Winter, Carla.
Contributor(s):
Title : Weipplich brust--manlich hertz: Lucretia in der "Römischen Historie"
Source: Beiträge zur Geschichte der deutschen Sprache und Literatur , 122., ( 2000):  Pages 279 - 291.
Year of Publication: 2000.

4. Record Number: 6304
Author(s): Rohlmann, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Botticellis "Primavera". Zu Anlass, Adressat und Funktion von mythologischen Gemälden im Florentiner Quattrocento
Source: Artibus et historiae , 33., 17 ( 1996):  Pages 97 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1996.

5. Record Number: 11205
Author(s): Leyser, Conrad.
Contributor(s):
Title : Long-haired Kings and Short-haired Nuns: Writing on the Body in Caesarius of Arles [The rule of the convent of St. John’s, founded by Bishop Caesarius of Arles in 512, specifies that the nuns have short hair. Futhermore, the nuns’ hair must be no longer than the specific length of a certain mark written in the regula manuscripts themselves. This hair length mandate may have arisen out of a desire to distinguish people in monastic orders from the kings in Germaic cultures, who commonly wore long hair. Rather than being a misogynist requirement derived from Scriptural passages on women’s appearance, this hair rule encourages a monastic identification between men and women and builds a tightly-knight community of religious women that resists outside social pressures. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Patristica , 24., ( 1993):  Pages 143 - 150. Papers presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 1991. Historica, Theologica et Philosophica, Gnostica
Year of Publication: 1993.

6. Record Number: 9528
Author(s): Mitchell, Linda E.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lady is a Lord: Noble Widows and Land in Thirteenth-Century Britain [Independent noble widows were common in medieval England; many chose to remain single after the death of a husband, thereby holding large amounts of land and maintaining control over their families and their tenants. These women actively participated in the public sphere, and social class carried greater importance than gender in defining their roles. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 18., 1 (Winter 1992):  Pages 71 - 97.
Year of Publication: 1992.

7. Record Number: 10527
Author(s): Opitz, Claudia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Life in the Late Middle Ages [The late-medieval era was a period of enormous change for women in work, family, life, and religion. Although women had an inferior legal status (laws limited their rights within the family and public sphere), some freedom did exist for women within marriage. Aristocratic women could be very influential because of their economic standing, middle class women could control household budgets, and rural women and wives of urban craftsmen sometimes had their status as laborers recognized. The author provides an overview of motherhood, fertility, contraception, women’s work (in rural and urban environments), and women’s participation in the fields of education, healing, health care, and crafts. Single women and widows could exert some power in their marginal positions. The author views convents as empowering institutions for women, although some people had anxieties about the status of women mystics. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 18., 1 (Winter 1992):  Pages 267 - 317.
Year of Publication: 1992.

8. Record Number: 10240
Author(s): Provost, William.
Contributor(s):
Title : Margery Kempe and Her Calling [The author examines the relationship between one’s identity and vocation (job or personal calling) in Margery Kempe’s book. Compared to the medieval woman writer Julian of Norwich (who clearly presents herself as an anchoress) and Chaucer’s fictional Wife of Bath (whose very occupation is being a “wife”), Margery’s social role is indeterminate. She is neither a conventional wife nor a religious woman, and she confuses both her contemporaries and modern readers because she does not fit into any stable occupational category. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Margery Kempe: A Book of Essays.   Edited by Sandra J. McEntire .   Garland Publishing, 1992. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 18., 1 (Winter 1992):  Pages 3 - 15.
Year of Publication: 1992.

9. Record Number: 10521
Author(s): Vecchio, Silvana.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Good Wife [Pastoral literature aimed at women helped spread church doctrine on women’s duties in marriage, often using examples from the lives of virtuous Biblical figures like Sarah or of female saints. These writings and others (like sermons) support the Aristotelian doctrine of marriage as a relationship between unequal partners; the wife must be faithful and submit to the will of her husband. The article also provides an overview of social views on the role of the husband as master and guide to the wife and family as well as the wife’s supplemental role in household management and the education and raising of children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Historical Reflections/ Reflexions historiques , 18., 1 (Winter 1992):  Pages 105 - 135.
Year of Publication: 1992.

10. Record Number: 11215
Author(s): Winstead, Karen A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Piety, Politics, and Social Commitment in Capgrave’s "Life of St. Katherine" [Capgrave radically changes old conventions of sacred biographies by creating a new saint’s life. Interested in political, historical, and personal frameworks for martyrdom, Capgrave explores the saint’s limitations as a human and examines how her earth-bound social status affects her public involvement in the secular world. This worldly shift in the representation of the female martyr protagonist reflects the poet’s need to appeal to bourgeois women who were the primary audience for saint’s lives and pious tales. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica , 17., ( 1991):  Pages 59 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1991.

11. Record Number: 11222
Author(s): Saller, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : European Family History and Roman Law
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 335 - 346.
Year of Publication: 1991.

12. Record Number: 11226
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Some Parallels in the Education of Medieval Jewish Women and Christian Women [An abstract precedes this essay in the journal.]
Source: Jewish History , 5., 1 (Spring 1991):  Pages 41 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1991.

13. Record Number: 10682
Author(s): Ross, Ellen M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Experience and Women's Autobiography: The Rhetoric of Selfhood in "The Book of Margery Kempe" [Kempe uses domestic and familial language as the dominant metaphors for describing her relationship with the divine and her mode of understanding, experiencing, and expressing the self. Not only does she use relational terms like "daughter," "mother," and "sister" to describe her connections to Christ and the Virgin Mary, but she also identifies herself with a tradition of holy women and, at other times, as a prophet. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 59., 3 (Fall 1991):  Pages 527 - 546.
Year of Publication: 1991.

14. Record Number: 11227
Author(s): Grossman, Avraham.
Contributor(s):
Title : Medieval Rabbinic Views on Wife-Beating, 800-1300
Source: Jewish History , 5., 1 (Spring 1991):  Pages 53 - 62.
Year of Publication: 1991.

15. Record Number: 12693
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Flaws in the Golden Bowl: Gender and Spiritual Formation in the Twelfth Century [In twelfth century Western Europe, religious writers debated whether arrangements for men and for women in religious life were meant to be identical, equal, or separate. While works on religious formation and spiritual growth can present monastic values as gender neutral and some writings (like Abelard's letters to Heloise) purport to praise the virtues of women, misogyny is nonetheless pervasive in monastic writings (women are aligned with carnality, loquacity, and curiosity). Moreover, gender plays an important role in differentiating the importance of chastity for men and for women, and gender profoundly affects how communal life and spiritual growth are represented. The Appendix offers a list of religious literature of formation produced between 1075 and 1225. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 111 - 146. Republished in From Virile Woman to WomanChrist: Studies in Medieval Religion and Literature. By Barbara Newman. Middle Ages Series. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. Pages 19-45
Year of Publication: 1990.

16. Record Number: 11192
Author(s): Harris, Barbara J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Property, Power, and Personal Relations: Elite Mothers and Sons in Yorkist and Early Tudor England [Women were often marginalized by patriarchal power structures that placed the father at the head of the family, but the birth of a son often elevated the wife’s position. Since the first son was greatly valued in a system of primogenitural inheritance, noble mothers often had close emotional ties to their sons. The political and social future of the family often rested on the mother’s ability to manage the household, display the family’s wealth and status, and negotiate marriages and other alliances for the family’s children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 15, 3 (Spring 1990): 606-632. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.