Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


10 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 3197
Author(s): French, Katherine L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maidens' Lights and Wives' Stores: Women's Parish Guilds in Late Medieval England
Source: Sixteenth Century Journal: The Journal of Early Modern Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) 29, 2 (Summer 1998): 399-425. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1998.

2. Record Number: 11205
Author(s): Leyser, Conrad.
Contributor(s):
Title : Long-haired Kings and Short-haired Nuns: Writing on the Body in Caesarius of Arles [The rule of the convent of St. John’s, founded by Bishop Caesarius of Arles in 512, specifies that the nuns have short hair. Futhermore, the nuns’ hair must be no longer than the specific length of a certain mark written in the regula manuscripts themselves. This hair length mandate may have arisen out of a desire to distinguish people in monastic orders from the kings in Germaic cultures, who commonly wore long hair. Rather than being a misogynist requirement derived from Scriptural passages on women’s appearance, this hair rule encourages a monastic identification between men and women and builds a tightly-knight community of religious women that resists outside social pressures. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studia Patristica , 24., ( 1993):  Pages 143 - 150. Papers presented at the Eleventh International Conference on Patristic Studies held in Oxford 1991. Historica, Theologica et Philosophica, Gnostica
Year of Publication: 1993.

3. Record Number: 11222
Author(s): Saller, Richard.
Contributor(s):
Title : European Family History and Roman Law
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 335 - 346.
Year of Publication: 1991.

4. Record Number: 11223
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The European Family and Canon Law
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 347 - 360.
Year of Publication: 1991.

5. Record Number: 11221
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Christianity and Endogamy
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 295 - 333.
Year of Publication: 1991.

6. Record Number: 11224
Author(s): Bonfield, Lloyd.
Contributor(s):
Title : Canon Law and Family Law in Medieval Western Christendom
Source: Continuity and Change , 6., 3 (December 1991):  Pages 361 - 374.
Year of Publication: 1991.

7. Record Number: 12748
Author(s): Al-Heitty, Abd Al-Kareem.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Contrasting Spheres of Free Women and Jawari in the Literary Life of the Early Abbasid Caliphate [Women, both bond and free, contributed much to Arabic literary life in the courts of the Abbasid caliphs. The poetry of women poets illustrates the overlapping social spheres occupied by free noble women and jawari (female slaves or prisoners of war) in early Abbasid times. Women of the courts could play active roles in governance and education and also played a crucial role in majalis (courtly social gatherings) by composing and performing poetry or facilitating more serious assemblies for intellectual discussion. However, as the luxury of the court increased and the number of jawari in the court grew, noble born upper class women began to be subjected to more circumscribed social roles and strict moral codes. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Al-Masåq , 3., ( 1990):  Pages 31 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1990.

8. Record Number: 12693
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Flaws in the Golden Bowl: Gender and Spiritual Formation in the Twelfth Century [In twelfth century Western Europe, religious writers debated whether arrangements for men and for women in religious life were meant to be identical, equal, or separate. While works on religious formation and spiritual growth can present monastic values as gender neutral and some writings (like Abelard's letters to Heloise purport to praise the virtues of women, misogyny is nonetheless pervasive in monastic writings (women are aligned with carnality, loquacity, and curiosity). Moreover, gender plays an important role in differentiating the importance of chastity for men and for women, and gender profoundly affects how communal life and spiritual growth are represented. The Appendix offers a list of religious literature of formation produced between 1075 and 1225. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 45., ( 1990):  Pages 111 - 146. Republished in From Virile Woman to WomanChrist: Studies in Medieval Religion and Literature. By Barbara Newman. Middle Ages Series. University of Pennsylvania Press, 1995. Pages 19-45
Year of Publication: 1990.

9. Record Number: 12732
Author(s): Cohen, Esther and Elliott. Horowitz
Contributor(s):
Title : In search of the sacred: Jews, Christians, and rituals of marriage in the later Middle Ages [For many centuries, Jews lived among Christians in most of Europe, and despite religious differences there was much interaction between the two communities in the realm of public social rituals. Even though the two faiths had different philosophies on the purpose of marriage and ethical status of marital sex, Jewish and Christian weddings ran parallel in the gradual sacralization of what was originally a secular ritual and the development of distinct rituals for the remarriage of widows. The upper classes in Jewish and Christian communities approached the marriage ritual as a way to draw sharp distinctions between the two faiths, including the location and timing of the event and what visual elements or objects were used. However, the lower classes often shared more similarities in their ritual behaviors due to a larger degree of contact within a shared culture and common experience. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 20., 2 (Fall 1990):  Pages 225 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1990.

10. Record Number: 11192
Author(s): Harris, Barbara J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Property, Power, and Personal Relations: Elite Mothers and Sons in Yorkist and Early Tudor England [Women were often marginalized by patriarchal power structures that placed the father at the head of the family, but the birth of a son often elevated the wife’s position. Since the first son was greatly valued in a system of primogenitural inheritance, noble mothers often had close emotional ties to their sons. The political and social future of the family often rested on the mother’s ability to manage the household, display the family’s wealth and status, and negotiate marriages and other alliances for the family’s children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 15, 3 (Spring 1990): 606-632. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.