Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


15 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 10984
Author(s): Harker, C. Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Chrystis Kirk on the Grene and "Peblis to the Ploy": The Economy of Gender [In these two Middle Scots satires female misbehavior is defined as sexual license, whether it be peasant girls who are available to every man or the lower-class woman who thinks that she can entice a well-off merchant. Harker argues that anxieties over class distinction and the instability of the urban burghs are transferred to unruly, lower class female bodies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Woman and the Feminine in Medieval and Early Modern Scottish Writing.   Edited by Sarah M. Dunnigan, C. Marie Harker, and Evelyn S. Newlyn .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004.  Pages 31 - 46.
Year of Publication: 2004.

2. Record Number: 16347
Author(s): Subrenat, Jean.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fabliau et satire cléricale: "La spécificité de "Frére Denise" par Rutebeuf
Source: Risus Mediaevalis: Laughter in Medieval Literature and Art.   Edited by Herman Braet, Guido Latré, and Werner Verbeke Mediaevalia Lovaniensia, Series 1, Studia 30. .   Leuven University Press, 2003.  Pages 143 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2003.

3. Record Number: 7201
Author(s): Léglu, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Women Perform Satirical Poetry? "Trobairitz" and "Soldadeiras" in Medieval Occitan Poetry [The author argues that women performed some satirical and political poems before audiences. Modern scholars have been slow to recognize women's roles as performers, particularly in the case of these poems that do not concern love, the topic deemed by scholars to be most suitable for women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 37., 1 (January 2001):  Pages 15 - 25.
Year of Publication: 2001.

4. Record Number: 4254
Author(s): Galloway, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Word-Play and Political Satire: Solving the Riddle of the Text of "Jezebel" [The author suggests that "Jezebel" is a political satire against Cnut and his concubine, Aelfgifu, and was written at the Norman court].
Source: Medium Aevum , 68., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 189 - 208.
Year of Publication: 1999.

5. Record Number: 4383
Author(s): Blumenfeld-Kosinski, Renate
Contributor(s):
Title : Satirical Views of the Beguines in Northern French Literature [the author briefly analyzes the writings of Gautier de Coincy, Guillaume de St. Amour, Rutebeuf, and Jean de Meun among others; the criticisms of the beguines focus on their sexuality, desire to preach and teach, association with mendicants, and talkativeness].
Source: New Trends in Feminine Spirituality: The Holy Women of Liège and Their Impact.   Edited by Juliette Dor, Lesley Johnson, and Jocelyn Wogan-Browne Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts, 2.   Brepols, 1999. Medium Aevum , 68., 2 ( 1999):  Pages 237 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1999.

6. Record Number: 3182
Author(s): Markus, Manfred.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Isle of Ladies (1475) as Satire [The author argues that the poem satirizes courtly love with double romances set on an island inhabited only by women.]
Source: Studies in Philology , 95., 3 (Summer 1998):  Pages 221 - 236.
Year of Publication: 1998.

7. Record Number: 6754
Author(s): Hurst, Peter W.
Contributor(s):
Title : On the Interplay of Learned and Popular Elements in the "De Phyllide et Flora" (Carm. Bur. 92) [the author examines the Latin debate poem between Phyllis and Flora who argue the merits of the priest versus the knight as lovers; the poem has a number of folklore elements including the Fairy Rade or wild hunt and the other world; the poem also has learned borrowings from the "De nuptiis" of Martianus Capella and references to the intellectual concerns of the day].
Source: Mittellateinisches Jahrbuch , 30., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 47 - 59.
Year of Publication: 1995.

8. Record Number: 4828
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Chaucer's "New Rachel" and the Theological Roots of Medieval Anti-Semitism [The author analyzes Chaucer's use of Rachel weeping in the Prioress's tale; the author is not able to say conclusively that Chaucer was satirizing antisemitism].
Source: Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester , 77., 3 (Autumn 1995):  Pages 9 - 19.
Year of Publication: 1995.

9. Record Number: 10368
Author(s): Fenster, Thelma.
Contributor(s):
Title : Did Christine Have a Sense of Humor? The Evidence of the "Epistre au dieu d’Amours" [One of the resources of feminine speech that Christine uses in her works is humor, which can be an instrument of moral critique. Christine uses the rhetorical strategies of humor, irony, and satire in her poetry to rebuke the misogyny of male authors, most powerfully in her attack of Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose.” Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Mittellateinisches Jahrbuch , 30., 2 ( 1995):  Pages 23 - 36.
Year of Publication: 1992.

10. Record Number: 10886
Author(s): Charles, Casey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Adversus Jerome: Liberation Theology in the "Wife of Bath’s Prologue" [The Wife of Bath subverts ecclesiastical (clerical) modes of Biblical exegesis in the “sermon” that begins her "Prologue." She appropriates the method of scriptural interpretation used by writers like Saint Jerome, but she uses their interpretive strategies to support her own worldly and carnal ideas on marriage and sexuality. Her sermon is more than a parody of the authorities she imitates; she exposes the misogyny of clerical writers and also sanctifies the profane through her appropriation of exegetical techniques. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Assays: Critical Approaches to Medieval and Renaissance Texts , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 55 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1991.

11. Record Number: 11761
Author(s): Jonassen, Frederick B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cathedral, Inn, and Pardoner in the "Prologue to the Tale of Beryn" [The anonymous author of a fifteenth-century continuation of Chaucer's Canterbury Tales adopts Chaucerian style, irony, and bawdy subject matter in his story of the Pardoner's adventures in a tavern. The narrative develops the rivalries between Chaucer's pilgrims and introduces a new female character Kitt the Tapster, who is partially modeled after the Wife of Bath. The comic and sinful world of the Inn is a carnivalesque parody of courtly love and other elements of high culture embodied by the Cathedral. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 18., ( 1991):  Pages 109 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1991.

12. Record Number: 11822
Author(s): Rudat, Wolfgang E. H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Chaucer's Earnest Games: Folk-Mode or Literary Sophistication? [There is no strict difference between the categories of "ernest" (serious, moral) and "game" (light, entertaining) in Chaucer's Canterbury Tales. The Merchant's Tale, a bawdy fabliau about an unfaithful wife and impotent husband, is an example of an "ernest game," a humorous form of story telling that has its roots in folklore and the oral tradition. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Language Notes , 29., 2 (December 1991):  Pages 16 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1991.

13. Record Number: 10686
Author(s): Terkla, Dan.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Basochien Proto-Drama and Its Mariological Context: "L'Advocacie Nostre Dame" [This French text about the Last Judgement dramatizes a confrontation between the Virgin Mary (as advocate for mankind) and Satan (in the role of the prosecutor). Scholars disagree about whether the text can be classified as a poem or a drama, and the author argues that it is a precursor to the burlesque lawsuits of the Basochiens. The text illustrates the intersection of two phenomena in medieval France, as the poem parodies both the fictional trials enacted by the Basochiens (lawyers in training) and the worship practices of the cult of the Virgin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Perspectives , 6., ( 1991):  Pages 87 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1991.

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Title : Garden of Earthly Delights, detail: Pig wearing Nun's Habit
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/7/75/Bosch-detail.jpg/250px-Bosch-detail.jpg
Year of Publication:

15. Record Number: 39183
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Abstinence Contrainte and Faux Semblant on their way to see Malebouche
Source:
Year of Publication: