Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


108 Record(s) Found in our database

Search Results

1. Record Number: 28446
Author(s): Hanaphy, Stephen,
Contributor(s):
Title : Consolation and Desperation: A Study of the Letters of Peter of Blois in the Name of Queen Eleanor of Aquitaine
Source: Medieval Italy, Medieval and Early Modern Women: Essays in Honour of Christine Meek.   Edited by Conor Kostick .   Four Courts Press, 2010.  Pages 206 - 219.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 14776
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : An Analysis of Power in the Writing of Mechtild of Magdeburg
Source: Feminist Theology , 14., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 189 - 204.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 20149
Author(s): Troup, Cynthia
Contributor(s):
Title : Art History and the Resistant Presence of a Saint - The chiesa vecchia Frescoes at Rome's Tor de' Specchi [Attilio Rossi was the first art historian to write in depth about the fresco cycle at Tore de' Specchi illustrating the life of Frances of Rome. These images were painted c. 1468 by Antoniazzo Romano or artists associated with him for the Oblates of Santa Francesca Romana. Rossi treated the images in rhetorical terms as illustrating the triumph of the saint through the depiction of the saint's life. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Rituals, Images, and Words: Varieties of Cultural Expression in Late Medieval and Early Modern Europe.   Edited by F. W. Kent and Charles Zika Late Medieval Early Modern Studies .   Brepols, 2005. Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 119 - 145.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 12604
Author(s): Brubaker, Leslie.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Age of Justinian: Gender and Society [The author provides a brief overview of gender issues in sixth century Byzantium. Topics discusssed include gendered expectations for both men and women as reflected in the portrayals of Justinian and Theodora by Procopius, law, public life, patronage, the church, and the increasing restrictions on women's roles after the reign of Justinian. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Cambridge Companion to the Age of Justinian.   Edited by Michael Maas .   Cambridge University Press, 2005. Feminist Theology , 14., 2 ( 2006):  Pages 427 - 447.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 14567
Author(s): Tyler, Elizabeth M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fictions of Family: The "Encomium Emmae Reginae" and Virgil's "Aeneid" [Tyler argues that the author of the "Encomium" sought to support Queen Emma by recounting the Danish conquest and rule of England. His history makes use of fiction and even lies to fashion a politically favorable account. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 149 - 179.
Year of Publication: 2005.

6. Record Number: 10852
Author(s): Howie, Cary.
Contributor(s):
Title : Vision Beyond Measure: The Threshold of Iacopone's Bedroom
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 139 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 10853
Author(s): Keen, Catherine M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sex and the Medieval City: Viewing the Body Politic from Exile in Early Italian Verse [Keen examines poems by four authors in exile (Dante, Cino da Pistoia, Pietro dei Faitinelli, and Niccolò del Rosso) in which the natal city is depicted as a beautiful woman; sometimes she is to be pitied, but other times she is hateful. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Troubled Vision: Gender, Sexuality, and Sight in Medieval Text and Image.   Edited by Emma Campbell and Robert Mills .   Palgrave Macmillan, 2004. Viator , 36., ( 2005):  Pages 155 - 171.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 10932
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ekphrasis at Kildare: The Imaginative Architecture of a Seventh Century Hagiographer [The author argues that the hagiographer Cogitosus wrote an extensive descripton of the church at Kildare in his "Vita" of Saint Brigit in order to link the space more closely with her sainted presence. Visitors to Kildare were not only connecting to Brigit, but to the center of Christian history with the church's borrowings from Rome. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 605 - 627.
Year of Publication: 2004.

9. Record Number: 11657
Author(s): Müller, Matthias
Contributor(s):
Title : Saint, Witch, Man, Maid, or Whore?: Joan of Arc and Writing History [The author analyses English historians' accounts from the fifteenth and sixteenth centuries about Joan of Arc's virginity. Bernau argues that their preoccupation signals larger concerns, not just about religious and political debates, but about the rhetoric of truth and representation in history. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Virginities.   Edited by Anke Bernau, Ruth Evans, and Sarah Salih .   Religion and Culture in the Middle Ages series. University of Wales Press; University of Toronto Press, 2003. Speculum , 79., 3 (July 2004):  Pages 214 - 233.
Year of Publication: 2003.

10. Record Number: 7270
Author(s): Beach, Alison I.
Contributor(s):
Title : Voices from a Distant Land: Fragments of a Twelfth-Century Nuns' Letter Collection [The author has identified nineteen full or partial letters written by nuns at Admont. Some are routine correspondence relating to patronage, but others are of a personal nature including a mother who wants her young daughter brought to her and a nun who
Source: Speculum , 77., 1 (January 2002):  Pages 34 - 54.
Year of Publication: 2002.

11. Record Number: 7401
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Marriage, Sexual Pleasure, and Learned Brides in the Wedding Orations of Fifteenth-Century Italy
Source: Renaissance Quarterly , 55., 2 (Summer 2002):  Pages 379 - 433.
Year of Publication: 2002.

12. Record Number: 5971
Author(s): Lees, Clare A. and Gillian R. Overing
Contributor(s):
Title : The Clerics and the Critics: Women and Rhetoric in Anglo-Saxon England
Source: Gender and Conflict in the Middle Ages. Gender and Medieval Studies Conference, York, January 5-7 2001. .  2001. Renaissance Quarterly , 55., 2 (Summer 2002):
Year of Publication: 2001.

13. Record Number: 10055
Author(s): Burgess, Christopher.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cynewulf's "Juliana" and the Art of Eloquence
Source: Old English Newsletter , 34., 3 (Spring 2001): Appendix A: Abstracts of Papers in Anglo-Saxon Studies. Conference paper presented at the Thirty-Sixth International Congress on Medieval Studies, the Medieval Institute, Western Michigan University, May 3-6, 2001, Nineteenth Symposium on the Sources of A
Year of Publication: 2001.

14. Record Number: 5604
Author(s): Mews, Constant J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hugh Metel, Heloise, and Peter Abelard: The Letters of an Augustinian Canon and the Challenge of Innovation in Twelfth-Century Lorraine [in the Appendix the author presents transcriptions along with English translations of the two Latin letters written by Hugh Metel to Heloise].
Source: Viator , 32., ( 2001):  Pages 59 - 91.
Year of Publication: 2001.

15. Record Number: 7903
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading Chaucer Reading Rape
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001. Viator , 32., ( 2001):  Pages 21 - 60.
Year of Publication: 2001.

16. Record Number: 5341
Author(s): Papaioannou, Eustratios N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Michael Psellos' Rhetorical Gender
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 24., ( 2000):  Pages 133 - 146.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 20896
Author(s): Morosini, Roberta
Contributor(s):
Title : Bone eloquence e mondo alla rovescia nel discorso "semblable a la reisun" nella novella di Madonna Filippa" ("Decameron" VI.7) [The tale of Madonna Filippa resembles Marie de France's fable about the peasant who demanded a higher price for his horse because the buyer had only seen the old half of the horse. The judge seeks to save Madonna Filippa's life when her husband brings a charge of adultery by employing a similar exercise in facile logic. He accepts Madonna Filippa's defense without objection, being moved by her beauty. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Italica , 77., 1 ( 2000):  Pages 1 - 13.
Year of Publication: 2000.

18. Record Number: 4581
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Romantic Entreaty in "The Kagero Diary" and "The Letters of Abelard and Heloise" [The author compares the requests of two women to renew contact with their lovers; they are both constrained by social expectations but use rhetoric to be both loving and wronged].
Source: Crossing the Bridge: Comparative Essays on Medieval European and Heian Japanese Women Writers.   Edited by Barbara Stevenson and Cynthia Ho .   Palgrave, 2000. Italica , 77., 1 ( 2000):  Pages 117 - 132.
Year of Publication: 2000.

19. Record Number: 4779
Author(s): Jestice, Phyllis G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Eternal Flame: State Formation, Deviant Architecture, and the Monumentality of Same-Sex Eroticism in the "Roman d'Eneas" ["My argument in this essay has been that in the heteronormative sexual and political economy of early Old French romance we can reclaim the disrputive effects of dialogism and desire, as well as the potentially subversive trace of the silencing of the other (a rhetorical strategy that is itself far from silent) in the historical process of state formation and in the ongoing processes of constructing national political identities." Page 310].
Source: GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 6, 2 (2000): 287-319. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2000.

20. Record Number: 8591
Author(s): Cowling, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Verbal and Visual Metaphors in the Cambridge Manuscript of the "Douze dames de rhétorique" (1463) [The text developed as an exchange of correspondence between the young, eager Jean Robertet and the respected older poet Georges Chastelain. Several of the manuscript versions include elaborate illustrations. The author explores how the artist was able to express the involved metaphors and prompt an allegorical reading of the images. The Appendix presents the text and English translations of the "enseignes" or self-descriptions of the twelve ladies. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 3., ( 2000):  Pages 94 - 118.
Year of Publication: 2000.

21. Record Number: 4806
Author(s): Phillips, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Almighty and Al Merciable Queene: Marian Titles and Marian Lyrics [The author examines the contradictions in praising a woman so highly; in general the references to Mary cast female power as safely abstract].
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000. Journal of the Early Book Society for the Study of Manuscripts and Printing History , 3., ( 2000):  Pages 83 - 99.
Year of Publication: 2000.

22. Record Number: 4208
Author(s): Vinson, Martha.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Life of Theodora and the Rhetoric of the Byzantine Bride Show
Source: Jahrbuch der Österreichischen Byzantinistik , 49., ( 1999):  Pages 31 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1999.

23. Record Number: 4666
Author(s): Gertz, SunHee Kim.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Descriptio" in Chaucer's "Troilus and Criseyde"
Source: Papers on Language and Literature , 35., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 141 - 166.
Year of Publication: 1999.

24. Record Number: 4271
Author(s): Otter, Monika.
Contributor(s):
Title : Closed Doors: An Epithalamium for Queen Edith, Widow and Virgin
Source: Constructions of Widowhood and Virginity in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Cindy L. Carlson and Angela Jane Weisl .   St. Martin's Press, 1999. Papers on Language and Literature , 35., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 63 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1999.

25. Record Number: 5364
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Code of Frustrated Desire: Courtly Love Poetry of the European Troubadours and Chinese Southern Dynasties Traditions
Source: Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 4., ( 1999):  Pages 1 - 21. Issue Theme- Discourses of Power: Grammar and Rhetoric in the Middle Ages.
Year of Publication: 1999.

26. Record Number: 5367
Author(s): Enders, Jody.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cutting Off the Memory of Women [The author argues that the "Malleus Maleficarum" demonized women's memory and thereby justified violence against women].
Source: The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric.   Edited by Christine Mason Sutherland and Rebecca Sutcliffe .   Papers at the Conference of the International Society for the History of Rhetoric at the University of Saskatchewan in July, 1997. University of Calgary Press, 1999. Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 4., ( 1999):  Pages 47 - 55.
Year of Publication: 1999.

27. Record Number: 5391
Author(s): Noell, Brian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marian Lyric in the Cistercian Monastery During the High Middle Ages ["This paper will place lyric poetry dedicated to the Virgin within the Cistercian context. I shall attempt to show that Marian verse, the sequence in particular, was well suited to the devotional needs of the monks of the twelfth- and early thirteenth-century Cistercian houses. Furthermore, I will demonstrate that it conformed well to a monastic environment which focused on the religious value of interactions of the monks with written texts. Finally, I shall illustrate how poetry provided an expanded vocabulary for the expression of the ever growing devotion in the order to Our Lady. The paper will conclude with an analysis of a collection of verse from the early thirteenth century composed by an anonymouse monk of Saint Mary of Noah (La Noë), a Cistercian house in northern France." (Pages 39-40)].
Source: Comitatus , 30., ( 1999):  Pages 37 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1999.

28. Record Number: 5370
Author(s): Ward, John.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Latin Rhetoric from Hrotsvit to Hildegard [The author briefly discusses the learning of Hrotsvitha of Gandersheim, the wife and daughters of Manegold of Lautenbach, the female poets mentioned by Baudri of Bourgeuil, Heloise, Abbess of Le Paraclet, and Hildegard].
Source: The Changing Tradition: Women in the History of Rhetoric.   Edited by Christine Mason Sutherland and Rebecca Sutcliffe .   Papers at the Conference of the International Society for the History of Rhetoric at the University of Saskatchewan in July, 1997. University of Calgary Press, 1999. Comitatus , 30., ( 1999):  Pages 121 - 132.
Year of Publication: 1999.

29. Record Number: 5354
Author(s): Papaioannou, Eustratios N.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminine "Physis" in Michael Psellos's Literary Work
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 25., ( 1999):  Pages 103
Year of Publication: 1999.

30. Record Number: 4754
Author(s): Watt, Diane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Literary Geneaology, Virile Rhetoric, and John Gower's "Confessio Amantis" ["In this article, my primary concern will be with the way in which Gower's construction of rhetoric can be seen to be both gendered and sexualized, especially when read alongside other classical and medieval discussions of the subject." page 392].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 78., 4 (Fall 1999):  Pages 389 - 415.
Year of Publication: 1999.

31. Record Number: 5255
Author(s): Robertson, Duncan.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anglo-Norman Verse Life of St. Mary the Egyptian [The author examines the six surviving manuscripts which preserve the Life of St. Mary the Egyptian; the author also considers rhetorical devices (anadiplosis (repetition)) and structural elements (narrative sequence)].
Source: Romance Philology , 52., (Fall 1998):  Pages 13 - 44.
Year of Publication: 1998.

32. Record Number: 4287
Author(s): Rapp, Beverlee Sian.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Woman Speaks: Language and Self-Representation in Hildegard's Letters [The author suggests that Hildegard adopts a comforting motherly tone when writing to women, while she has a variety of approaches to men: supplicatory, humble yet confident, and bold as the mouthpiece of God].
Source: Hildegard of Bingen: A book of Essays.   Edited by Maud Burnett McInerney .   Garland Publishing, 1998. Romance Philology , 52., (Fall 1998):  Pages 3 - 24.
Year of Publication: 1998.

33. Record Number: 3992
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Poet: "Where the Living Majesty Utters Mysteries"
Source: Voice of the Living Light: Hildegard of Bingen and Her World.   Edited by Barbara Newman .   University of California Press, 1998. Romance Philology , 52., (Fall 1998):  Pages 176 - 192.
Year of Publication: 1998.

34. Record Number: 3634
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Me atrevo a escribir así: Confessional Politics in the Letters of Isabel I and Hernando de Talavera [The author argues that Isabel wrote exaggeratedly humble letters to her confessor in order to resist his rigid rules for women's behavior].
Source: Women at Work in Spain: From the Middle Ages to Early Modern Times.   Edited by Marilyn Stone and Carmen Benito-Vessels .   Peter Lang, 1998. Romance Philology , 52., (Fall 1998):  Pages 147 - 173.
Year of Publication: 1998.

35. Record Number: 3367
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Misogyny in a Medieval University? The "Hoc contra malos" Commentary on Walter Map's "Dissuasio Valerii" [the commentator makes no attempt to develop or justify the bigotry expressed by Map against women].
Source: Journal of Medieval Latin , 8., ( 1998):  Pages 156 - 191.
Year of Publication: 1998.

36. Record Number: 3395
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Dominus/"Ancilla": Rhetorical Subjectivity and Sexual Violence in the Letters of Heloise
Source: The Tongue of the Fathers: Gender and Ideology in Twelfth-Century Latin.   Edited by David Townsend and Andrew Taylor .   University of Pennsylvania Press, 1998. Journal of Medieval Latin , 8., ( 1998):  Pages 35 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1998.

37. Record Number: 7821
Author(s): Jaffe, Samuel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Commentary as Exposition: The "Declaratio oracionis de beata Dorothea" of Nicolaus Dybinus [Nicolaus Dybinus or Nicolaus de Dybin, a schoolmaster in Dresden, composed a model poem about Saint Dorothy in order to illustrate all the different rhetorical figures, known as the "colores rethoricales." A large part of the article is devoted to explicating some of the rhetorical figures used in the text. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Teaching: SMART , 6., 2 (Fall 1998):  Pages 35 - 47.
Year of Publication: 1998.

38. Record Number: 5434
Author(s): Paxson, James J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender Personified, Personification Gendered, and the Body Figuralized in "Piers Plowman" [The author first considers the tradition of personifications embodied as females and then argues that the gender of Meed and Anima are key feature in Langland's allegory].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 65 - 96.
Year of Publication: 1998.

39. Record Number: 3140
Author(s): Leyser, Conrad.
Contributor(s):
Title : Custom, Truth, and Gender in Eleventh-Century Reform [argues that Gregory VII and his reformers used a rhetoric of sexual pollution and womanly influence against their clerical contemporaries.]
Source: Gender and Christian religion: papers read at the 1996 Summer Meeting and the 1997 Winter Meeting of the Ecclesiastical History Society.   Edited by R. N. Swanson Studies in Church History, 34.  1998. Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 75 - 91.
Year of Publication: 1998.

40. Record Number: 4059
Author(s): Leyser, Conrad.
Contributor(s):
Title : Vulnerability and Power: The Early Christian Rhetoric of Masculine Authority ["Well before the twelfth century, Christian men in positions of public power had developed a language with which to express and, if possible, turn to their advantage, the precariousness of their position. Trading on already established notions of moral masculinity, these men were unafraid to depict themselves as weak, inadequate, and continuously suffering rulers--because they knew that their political survival depended on their demonstrating their absolute disinterest in personal gain from their office." Pages 172- 173].
Source: Bulletin of the John Rylands University Library of Manchester , 80., 3 (Autumn 1998):  Pages 159 - 173.
Year of Publication: 1998.

41. Record Number: 5344
Author(s): Porter, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rhetorical Phallacies: The Poetics of Misogyny in Jean de Meun's Discourse of Nature
Source: Mediaevalia , 22., 1 ( 1998):  Pages 59 - 77. Published by the Center for Medieval and Early Renaissance Studies, State University of New York at Binghamton
Year of Publication: 1998.

42. Record Number: 3702
Author(s): Gwara, Scott.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Transmission of the "Digby" Corpus of Bilingual Glosses to Aldhelm's "Prosa de virginitate
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 27., ( 1998):  Pages 139 - 168.
Year of Publication: 1998.

43. Record Number: 3360
Author(s): Johnson, Laurie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Reading the Excursus on Women as a Model of "Modern" Temporality in Gottfried's Tristan
Source: Neophilologus , 82., 2 (April 1998):  Pages 247 - 257.
Year of Publication: 1998.

44. Record Number: 1914
Author(s): O'Connor, Eugene.
Contributor(s):
Title : Panormita's Reply to His Critics: The "Hermaphroditus" and the Literary Defense
Source: Renaissance Quarterly (Full Text via JSTOR) 50, 4 (Winter 1997): 985-1010. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

45. Record Number: 2478
Author(s): Sullivan, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Inquisitorial Origins of Literary Debate [argues that Christine and her opponents, Gontier and Pierre Col and Jean de Montreuil, in the "Querrelle de la Rose" all used inquisitorial rhetoric and branded the opposite side as heretics in need of salvation].
Source: Romanic Review , 88., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 27 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1997.

46. Record Number: 2667
Author(s): McNamer, Sarah.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dhuoda's "Handbook for William" and the Mother's Manual Tradition
Source: Listening to Their Voices: The Rhetorical Activities of Historical Women.   Edited by Molly Meijer Wertheimer .   University of South Carolina Press, 1997. Romanic Review , 88., 1 (January 1997):  Pages 177 - 198.
Year of Publication: 1997.

47. Record Number: 34282
Author(s): Irvine, Martin,
Contributor(s):
Title : Abelard and (Re)Writing the Male Body: Castration, Identity, and Remasculinization
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997.  Pages 87 - 106.
Year of Publication: 1997.

48. Record Number: 2460
Author(s): Thomas, Susanne Sara.
Contributor(s):
Title : What the Man of Law Can't Say: The Buried Legal Argument of the Wife of Bath's "Prologue" [argues that the poem comments on the struggle over law among king, parliament, bureaucrats, and peasants; it supports the legal authority of the oral over the written].
Source: Chaucer Review , 31., 3 ( 1997):  Pages 256 - 271.
Year of Publication: 1997.

49. Record Number: 2666
Author(s): Richardson, Malcolm.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Commerce, and Rhetoric in Medieval England [analyzes women's business letters, primarily from the collections of the Paston, Stonor, and Plumpton families; many of these gentry women were left in charge of the family estates while their husbands stayed in London on business].
Source: Listening to Their Voices: The Rhetorical Activities of Historical Women.   Edited by Molly Meijer Wertheimer .   University of South Carolina Press, 1997. Chaucer Review , 31., 3 ( 1997):  Pages 133 - 149.
Year of Publication: 1997.

50. Record Number: 2707
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman's "Pryvete," May, and the Privy: Fissures in the Narrative Voice in the "Merchant's Tale," 1944-86 [examines the disjunction in May's character between the raped young bride and the duplicitous shrew who cuckolds the old knight in the misogynous fabliau ending].
Source: Chaucer Yearbook , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 61 - 77.
Year of Publication: 1997.

51. Record Number: 2418
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Origenary Fantasies: Abelard's Castration and Confession
Source: Becoming Male in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Jeffrey Jerome Cohen and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1997. Chaucer Yearbook , 4., ( 1997):  Pages 107 - 128.
Year of Publication: 1997.

52. Record Number: 20792
Author(s): Rittey, Joanne
Contributor(s):
Title : Woman as Vessel in the Joseph d' Arimathie
Source: Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 15., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 101 - 116.
Year of Publication: 1997.

53. Record Number: 2668
Author(s): Dietrich, Julia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Visionary Rhetoric of Hildegard of Bingen
Source: Listening to Their Voices: The Rhetorical Activities of Historical Women.   Edited by Molly Meijer Wertheimer .   University of South Carolina Press, 1997. Parergon: Journal of the Australian and New Zealand Association for Medieval and Early Modern Studies , 15., 1 ( 1997):  Pages 199 - 214.
Year of Publication: 1997.

54. Record Number: 2483
Author(s): Donovan, Josephine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and the Framed-Novelle: A Tradition of Their Own [argues that women used the prose fiction form to counter such misogynist ideas as women as commodities of exchange and thereby developed a feminist consciousness, an awareness of the unjust subordination of women; though primarily devoted to women authors in the early modern period, the author briefly discusses the "Livre de la cité des dames" and the "Evangiles des quenouilles"].
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 22, 4 (Summer 1997): 947-980. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

55. Record Number: 1868
Author(s): Freeman, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Public and Private Functions of Heloise's Letters
Source: Journal of Medieval History , 23., 1 (March 1997):  Pages 15 - 28.
Year of Publication: 1997.

56. Record Number: 840
Author(s): Margolis, Nadia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cry of the Chameleon: Evolving Voices in the Epistles of Christine de Pizan
Source: Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 1., ( 1996):  Pages 37 - 70.
Year of Publication: 1996.

57. Record Number: 1741
Author(s): Hill, Barbara
Contributor(s):
Title : The ideal Imperial Komnenian Women [drawing upon funeral orations and speeches, the author analyzes the female virtues praised before the emperor (beauty, piety, fertility, and modesty) and those for a female patron (self-control, learning, and wisdom)].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 23., ( 1996):  Pages 7 - 18. Revised papers that were originally read at the session entitled "Komnenian Culture" at the Twentieth Annual Byzantine Studies Conference, Ann Arbor, Michigan, on September 21, 1994
Year of Publication: 1996.

58. Record Number: 4625
Author(s): Ferroul, Yves.
Contributor(s):
Title : Le Livre de Gomorrhe [The author questions Peter Damian's arguments against homosexuality and other sex acts "against nature;" the author analyzes three kinds of arguments: based on evidence, on Biblical scripture, and on rhetorical figures].
Source: Sex, Love and Marriage in Medieval Literature and Reality: Thematische Beiträge im Rahmen des 31th [sic] International Congress on Medieval Studies an der Western Michigan University (Kalamazoo-USA) 8.-12. Mai 1996.   Edited by Danielle Buschinger and Wolfgang Spiewok WODAN Bd. 69. Serie 3 Tagungsbände und Sammelschriften Actes de Colloques et Ouvrages Collectifs, 40.   Reineke-Verlag, 1996. Byzantinische Forschungen , 23., ( 1996):  Pages 21 - 31.
Year of Publication: 1996.

59. Record Number: 857
Author(s): Dull, Olga Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rhetorical Paradoxes of the French Late Middle Ages: Mother Folly the Wise
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 22., ( 1996):  Pages 68 - 84.
Year of Publication: 1996.

60. Record Number: 842
Author(s): Richardson, Malcolm.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women, Commerce, and Writing in Late Medieval England [family and business letters sent by women ].
Source: Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 1., ( 1996):  Pages 123 - 145.
Year of Publication: 1996.

61. Record Number: 1217
Author(s): Johnson, Timothy.
Contributor(s):
Title : To Her Who Is Half of Her Soul: Clare of Assisi and the Medieval Epistolary Tradition [analysis of Clare's letters to Agnes of Prague].
Source: Magistra , 2., 1 (Summer 1996):  Pages 24 - 50.
Year of Publication: 1996.

62. Record Number: 1469
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : A Voice for the Prioress: The Context of English Devotional Prose [analyzes stylistic features that echo the colloquial and affective elements in devotional literature written for women religious as well as common rhetorical practices like repetition and opposition].
Source: Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 18., ( 1996):  Pages 25 - 54.
Year of Publication: 1996.

63. Record Number: 1625
Author(s): Epp, Garrett P.J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Learning to Write with Venus's Pen: Sexual Regulation in Matthew of Vend™me's "Ars versificatoria"
Source: Desire and Discipline: Sex and Sexuality in the Premodern West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray and Konrad Eisenbichler .   University of Toronto Press, 1996. Studies in the Age of Chaucer , 18., ( 1996):  Pages 265 - 279.
Year of Publication: 1996.

64. Record Number: 841
Author(s): Classen, Albrecht.
Contributor(s):
Title : Female Explorations of Literacy: Epistolary Challenges to the Literary Canon in the Late Middle Ages [style and content of women's letters found in Georg Steinhausen's edition, "Deutsche Privatbriefe des Mittelalters"].
Source: Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 1., ( 1996):  Pages 89 - 121.
Year of Publication: 1996.

65. Record Number: 1621
Author(s): Gonz‡lez-Casanovas, Roberto J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender Models in Alfonso X's 'Siete partidas': The Sexual Politics of 'Nature' and 'Society' [this interpretation based on historicist theories looks at the "Siete Partidas" as a literary creation and a social utopia].
Source: Desire and Discipline: Sex and Sexuality in the Premodern West.   Edited by Jacqueline Murray and Konrad Eisenbichler .   University of Toronto Press, 1996. Disputatio: An International Transdisciplinary Journal of the Late Middle Ages , 1., ( 1996):  Pages 42 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1996.

66. Record Number: 813
Author(s): Clough, Cecil H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Daughters and Wives of the Montefeltro: Outstanding Bluestockings of the Quattrocento [discusses their learning, roles in public life, and Christian devotion].
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 1 (March 1996):  Pages 31 - 55.
Year of Publication: 1996.

67. Record Number: 3637
Author(s): Brown, Catherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Muliebriter: Doing Gender in the Letters of Heloise [argues that Heloise adopts a number of gendered personae in her letters, including whore, castrata, and hypocrite in order to assert her mastery over Abelard].
Source: Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages.   Edited by Jane Chance .   University Press of Florida, 1996. Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 10., 1 (March 1996):  Pages 25 - 51.
Year of Publication: 1996.

68. Record Number: 5134
Author(s): Gertz, Sun Hee Kim.
Contributor(s):
Title : Transforming Lovers and Memorials in Ovid and Marie de France
Source: Florilegium , 14., ( 1995- 1996):  Pages 99 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1995- 1996.

69. Record Number: 434
Author(s): Redfern, Jenny R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine de Pisan and "The Treasure of the City of Ladies": A Medieval Rhetorician and Her Rhetoric
Source: Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition.   Edited by Andrea A. Lunsford Pittsburgh series in composition, literacy, and culture .   University of Pittsburgh Press, 1995. Allegorica , 16., ( 1995):  Pages 73 - 92.
Year of Publication: 1995.

70. Record Number: 503
Author(s): Albrecht, Efrossini P.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Anglo- Saxon Judith: A Master of "Eloquentia" [Second International Medieval Conference, University of Leeds, July 10-13, 1995. Session 106].
Source: Old English Newsletter , 28., 3 (Spring 1995):
Year of Publication: 1995.

71. Record Number: 403
Author(s): Rollo, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gerald of Wales' "Topographia Hibernica": Sex and the Irish Nation
Source: Romanic Review , 86., 2 (March 1995):  Pages 169 - 190. Special issue: The Production of Knowledge: Institutionalizing Sex, Gender, and Sexualiity in Medieval Discourse. Ed. by Kathryn Gravdal.
Year of Publication: 1995.

72. Record Number: 6623
Author(s): Scott, Karen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Candied Oranges, Vinegar, and Dawn: The Imagery of Conversion in the Letters of Caterina of Siena [The author examines three letters that Catherine wrote in 1378 to Monna Costanza Soderini, wife of one of the Guelph leaders of Florence, to Stefano Maconi, one of her disciples in Siena, and to Pope Urban; all three of her correspondents were having dif
Source: Annali d'Italianistica , 13., ( 1995):  Pages 91 - 107. Women Mystic Writers. Edited by Dino S. Cervigni
Year of Publication: 1995.

73. Record Number: 1193
Author(s): Wallace, D. Patricia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Feminine Rhetoric and the Epistolary Tradition: The Boniface Correspondence [discusses letters written by Eangyth and Bugga and Abbess Ecgburg to Boniface and letters from the nun Berhtgyth to her brother Balthard].
Source: Women's Studies , 24., 3 ( 1995):  Pages 229 - 246. Special Issue: Issues in Medieval and Renaissance Scholarship
Year of Publication: 1995.

74. Record Number: 1162
Author(s): van Dijk, Ann.
Contributor(s):
Title : Domus Sanctae Dei Genetricis Mariae: Art and Liturgy in the Oratory of Pope John VII (705-707)
Source: Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 76
Year of Publication: 1995.

75. Record Number: 433
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Reexamining "The Book of Margery Kempe": A Rhetoric of Autobiography
Source: Reclaiming Rhetorica: Women in the Rhetorical Tradition.   Edited by Andrea A. Lunsford Pittsburgh series in composition, literacy, and culture .   University of Pittsburgh Press, 1995. Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 53 - 71.
Year of Publication: 1995.

76. Record Number: 1713
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Christine et les conventions dans le "Livre de la Mutacion de Fortune" : "abriger en parolles voires"
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Byzantine Studies Conference. Abstracts of Papers , 21., ( 1995):  Pages 349 - 356.
Year of Publication: 1995.

77. Record Number: 1353
Author(s): Corthals, Johan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Affiliation of Children: "Immathchor nAilella Ocus Airt"
Source: Peritia: Journal of the Medieval Academy of Ireland , 9., ( 1995):  Pages 92 - 124.
Year of Publication: 1995.

78. Record Number: 1716
Author(s): Zink, Gaston.
Contributor(s):
Title : La phrase de Christine de Pizan dans le "Livre du Corps de Policie"
Source: Une femme de Lettres au Moyen Age: Études autour de Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Liliane Dulac and Bernard Ribémont .   Paradigme, 1995. Peritia: Journal of the Medieval Academy of Ireland , 9., ( 1995):  Pages 383 - 395.
Year of Publication: 1995.

79. Record Number: 903
Author(s): Brown, Cynthia J.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Late Medieval Cultural Artifact: "The Twelve Ladies of Rhetoric" ("Les Douze Dames de Rhétorique")
Source: Allegorica , 16., ( 1995):  Pages 73 - 105.
Year of Publication: 1995.

80. Record Number: 2695
Author(s): Gwara, Scott.
Contributor(s):
Title : Manuscripts of Aldhelm's "Prosa de Virginitate" and the Rise of Hermeneutic Literacy in Tenth-Century England [descriptions of several "Prosa de virginitate" manuscripts with a proposed textual transmission; the author suggests that Glastonbury and Canterbury were the Benedictine centers that produced the extensive glosses and were responsible for the Aldhelm revival in the tenth century].
Source: Studi Medievali , 35., 1 (Giugno 1994):  Pages 101 - 159.
Year of Publication: 1994.

81. Record Number: 3411
Author(s): Enders, Jody.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Feminist Mnemonics of Christine de Pizan
Source: MLQ: Modern Language Quarterly , 55., 3 (September 1994):  Pages 231 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1994.

82. Record Number: 11421
Author(s): Laennec, Christine Moneera.
Contributor(s):
Title : Unladylike Polemics: Christine de Pizan's Strategies of Attack and Defense [The author discusses Pizan's methods of argumentation. By claiming female weakness and the persona of a virgin martyr, she put her attackers at a decided disadvantage. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Tulsa Studies in Women's Literature (Full Text via JSTOR) 12, 1 (Spring 1993): 47-59. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1993.

83. Record Number: 10369
Author(s): McLeod, Glenda.
Contributor(s):
Title : Poetics and Antimisogynist Polemics in Christine de Pizan’s "Le Livre de la Cite des Dames" [The author explores the central role of morality and ethics in Christine’s work. The “Livre” is a work of generic and allegorical sophistication. In this text, Christine adapts some of the structures and rhetorical conventions of scholasticism in order to attack literary misogyny. The author compares the literary strategies used in Christine’s work to the allegorical procedures used by scholastic thinkers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 37 - 47.
Year of Publication: 1992.

84. Record Number: 10373
Author(s): Margolis, Nadia.
Contributor(s):
Title : Elegant Closures: The Use of the Diminutive in Christine de Pizan and Jean de Meun [Christine wasn’t overcome by any anxiety of influence in regard to her poetic predecessor Jean de Meun; instead, she was independent in her use of rhetoric. Her use of diminutives, in particular, is a powerful tool for expressing her feminist concerns. While male authors tend to use the diminutive form of words in order to condescend, Christine uses these word forms in more subtle and varied ways. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 111 - 123.
Year of Publication: 1992.

85. Record Number: 10374
Author(s): Beer, Jeanette M. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Stylistic Conventions in "Le Livre de la mutacion de Fortune" [In her allegorical poem, Christine uses rhetorical devices (particularly “dilatio,” “amplificatio,” and “abbreviatio”) in order to construct her relationship with her readers. While she does use some tropes that male poets use, Christine disassociates herself from particular tropes used in Jean de Meun’s “Roman de la Rose” and Guillaume Machaut’s “Livre de Voir-Dit.” The author also argues that Christine is unable to integrate the question of Jewish history into the larger historical vision of the work. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 124 - 136.
Year of Publication: 1992.

86. Record Number: 10376
Author(s): Curnow, Maureen Cheney.
Contributor(s):
Title : La Pioche d’Inquisition: Legal-Judicial Content and Style in Christine de Pizan’s "Livre de la Cite des Dames" [During her early years as a writer, Christine had extensive experience with royal law courts and legal proceedings both in her own life and in connection with her father and her husband. Christine’s knowledge and application of legal terminology and style in her work reflects the close connection between law and rhetoric in medieval education. Drawing upon her own education, Christine uses legal vocabulary in her poetry as part of a larger argument in favor of female participation in the law. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 157 - 172.
Year of Publication: 1992.

87. Record Number: 10380
Author(s): Blanchard, Joel.
Contributor(s):
Title : Compilation and Legitimation in the Fifteenth Century: "Le Livre de la Cite des Dames" [The author traces the complicated rhetorical processes involved in Christine’s adaptation of her literary sources; compilation is the central organizational principle of the work. The author suggests that we evaluate Christine’s work on the basis of its aesthetic value, and not base our judgments on an analysis of the work’s content. The author concludes by describing how the illustrations in a manuscript of “Le Livre” have an autobiographical function. In addition to depicting Christine herself, the illustrations use images of books and allegorical figures to legitimize Christine as an author. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Reinterpreting Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Earl Jeffrey Richards, Joan Williamson, Nadia Margolis, and Christine Reno .   University of Georgia Press, 1992. Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 228 - 249.
Year of Publication: 1992.

88. Record Number: 7167
Author(s): Wine, Joseph D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Juliana and the Figures of Rhetoric [The author argues that Cynewulf's "Juliana" should be given greater credit by modern readers. The author analyzes in detail the various rhetorical figures the poet used for structure, transition, characterization, irony, and verbal echo.].
Source: Papers on Language and Literature , 28., 1 (Winter 1992):  Pages 3 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1992.

89. Record Number: 11117
Author(s): Leppig, Linda.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Political Rhetoric of Christine de Pizan: "Lamentation sur les maux de la guerre civile [Christine addresses the Duke of Berry, calling on him to abandon his allegiance to the Duke of Orléans and seek peace for the good of the French people. Leppig argues that Christine combines elements from two literary forms, the "complainte" and the epistle, in order to excite pity and, at the same time, reproach those in the ruling elite she held responsible. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Margaret Brabant .   Westview Press, 1992. Papers on Language and Literature , 28., 1 (Winter 1992):  Pages 141 - 156.
Year of Publication: 1992.

90. Record Number: 8703
Author(s): Gravdal, Kathryn.
Contributor(s):
Title : Metaphor, Metonymy, and the Medieval Women Trobairitz [The author argues that the metaphorical expressions of the troubadour’s love and suffering before an all-powerful "domna" figure him as a woman. The female trobairitz counter this self-serving construction of gender by creating songs in which women have the possibility of self-expression and agency. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 83., 4 ( 1992):  Pages 411 - 426.
Year of Publication: 1992.

91. Record Number: 8702
Author(s): Gingrass-Conley, Katharine.
Contributor(s):
Title : La "Venue" à l’écriture de la dame dans "Le Chaitivel" [The author argues that Marie made "Chaitivel" a complex response to courtly love with three readings of the unnamed lady. In the first the lady submits to the surviving suitor knight. In the second reading the lady provides an ironic commentary on courtly love. In the third the lady realizes her desire is to tell the story of her experiences. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 83., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 149 - 160.
Year of Publication: 1992.

92. Record Number: 8730
Author(s): Stevens, Christian D.
Contributor(s):
Title : Editorial Restraint in Julian of Norwich’s "The Revelations of Divine Love"
Source: University College Galway Women's Studies Centre Review , 1., ( 1992):  Pages 123 - 130.
Year of Publication: 1992.

93. Record Number: 7244
Author(s): Nelson, Jan A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Abbreviated Style and les "Lais" de Marie de France [The author argues that Marie de France's rhetorical use of "abreviatio" (a term that emerged in twelfth-century theoretical treatises on rhetoric) is the most significant aspect of her compositional style, and shows her to be a sophisticated writer. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romance Quarterly , 39., 2 (May 1992):  Pages 131 - 143.
Year of Publication: 1992.

94. Record Number: 7245
Author(s): Dawson, Robert B.
Contributor(s):
Title : Custance in Context: Rethinking the Protagonist of the "Man of Law's Tale" [The author suggests that we reconsider Custance in terms of her sophisticated, ironic use of language (which works to control her audience's view of her as a saintly figure) rather than as a completely passive and victimized character. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 293 - 308.
Year of Publication: 1992.

95. Record Number: 10768
Author(s): Frese, Dolores Warwick.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Names of Women in the "Canterbury Tales": Chaucer's Hidden Art of Involucral Nomenclature [The author briefly discusses the rhetorical figure of "involucrum," which uses personal names to convey an allegorical meaning. The examples Frese cites include Saint Cecilie, Seinte Loy, and the description of the Wife of Bath as "biside Bath." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 155 - 166.
Year of Publication: 1992.

96. Record Number: 10756
Author(s): Allen, Valerie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blaunche on Top and Alisoun on Bottom [The author explores Chaucer's use of "descriptio" to characterize Blaunche and Alisoun. With Blaunche the physical characteristics confirm her virtuous moral qualities, while Alisoun's carnality givers her a certain autonomy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 23 - 29.
Year of Publication: 1992.

97. Record Number: 10779
Author(s): Wimsatt, James I.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Wife of Bath, the Franklin, and the Rhetoric of St. Jerome [The author briefly explores the variety of viewpoints on virginity and marriage expressed by the Wife of Bath arguing against Jerome and the Franklin advocating a moderate response to Dorigen's solution of death or dishonor. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A Wyf Ther Was: Essays in Honour of Paule Mertens-Fonck.   Edited by Juliette Dor .   English Department, University of Liège, 1992. Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 275 - 281.
Year of Publication: 1992.

98. Record Number: 11118
Author(s): McKinley, Mary.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Subversive "Seulette" [The author briefly discusses Christine's rhetorical strategies in the "Lamentacion sur les maux de la guerre civile." While identifying herself as a "little woman, alone and apart," she persuasively but tactfully reminds the Duke of Berry of his obligations to the princes and people of France. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Politics, Gender, and Genre: The Political Thought of Christine de Pizan.   Edited by Margaret Brabant .   Westview Press, 1992. Chaucer Review , 26., 3 ( 1992):  Pages 157 - 169.
Year of Publication: 1992.

99. Record Number: 10019
Author(s): Schotter, Anne H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rhetoric versus rape in the medieval Latin Pamphilus [The author examines language and force as instruments of power in the "Pamphilus." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 243 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1992.

100. Record Number: 11218
Author(s): Carlson, Paula J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Lady Meed and God’s Meed: The Grammar of 'Piers Plowman' B 3 and C 4 [In revising his poem, William Langland expands a passage (in what is known as the B-text) into a longer passage (in what is known as the C-text) that describes the debate between Conscience and Lady Meed. Much of modern readers’ confusion about the meaning of the C-text passage lies in the misleading punctuation in W. W. Skeat’s printed edition of the poem. The editor’s punctuation choices obscure the sustained grammatical metaphor Langland uses in the revised C-text. In this new passage, the relationship between nouns and adjectives are meant to describe (by way of analogy) the relationship between God and humanity. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Traditio , 46., ( 1991):  Pages 291 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1991.

101. Record Number: 11066
Author(s): Brownlee, Kevin.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Image of History in Christine de Pizan’s "Livre de la Mutacion de Fortune" [Christine creates a double representation of history in this poem. In addition to relating all the great events in human history, she also presents a personal history in the form of an allegorical autobiography. This narrative fictionalizes her own development into the author of the book, as Christine presents her past self reading a sequence of wall paintings. As she narrates these images, Christine establishes her unique authority as a female poet of history, differentiating herself from the male wall-reading protagonists of the Aeneid, Roman de le Rose, the Prose Lancelot, and Dante’s Divine Comedy. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 44-56. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

102. Record Number: 11068
Author(s): Nichols, Stephen G.
Contributor(s):
Title : Marie de France’s Commonplaces [In her lais, Marie espouses the low culture of oral tradition and Breton folk tales over the literate Latin tradition, which was held in high esteem. The poetic technique of her lais combines classical rhetoric and popular narrative elements (like the use of vernacular and common proverbs). Her innovative use of commonplaces departs from Classical traditions and reforms the attitudes toward women and sexuality expressed in canonical Latin poetry. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 134-148. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

103. Record Number: 11200
Author(s): Owen, Charles A., Jr.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Falcon’s Complaint in the Squire’s Tale [In its form and content, the falcon’s lament departs from the traditional poetic genre of the complaint. The poetic structure (including rhyme and meter) of this passage differs from other poems in the complaint genre, and the passage serves a narrative function as well as a lyric one. It relates the story of the falcon’s betrayal by her male lover and simultaneously expresses her emotional state through a complex series of poetic devices, including metaphors and allusions. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Rebels and rivals: the contestive spirit in The Canterbury tales.   Edited by Susanna Greer Fein, David Raybin, and Peter C. Braeger Studies in medieval culture .   Medieval Institute Publications, Western Michigan University, 1991.  Pages 173 - 188.
Year of Publication: 1991.

104. Record Number: 11670
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Mark of Gender in Saint Bernard's "De diligendo deo" [In his treatise on loving God, Bernard figures the soul at times as feminine and at times as masculine in his exploration of the ascent toward union with God. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romance Languages Annual , 3., ( 1991):  Pages 7 - 11.
Year of Publication: 1991.

105. Record Number: 10682
Author(s): Ross, Ellen M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Spiritual Experience and Women's Autobiography: The Rhetoric of Selfhood in "The Book of Margery Kempe" [Kempe uses domestic and familial language as the dominant metaphors for describing her relationship with the divine and her mode of understanding, experiencing, and expressing the self. Not only does she use relational terms like "daughter," "mother," and "sister" to describe her connections to Christ and the Virgin Mary, but she also identifies herself with a tradition of holy women and, at other times, as a prophet. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the American Academy of Religion , 59., 3 (Fall 1991):  Pages 527 - 546.
Year of Publication: 1991.

106. Record Number: 11216
Author(s): Cooper, Helen.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender and Personification in "Piers Plowman" [Although most allegorical writings associate personifications with femininity (abstract nouns often being grammatically feminine in Latin and Romance languages), Langland’s Middle English poem genders personifications based on what attribute they are intended to represent, sometimes representing them as male and sometimes as female. The Seven Deadly Sins, for instance, are not personified as abstract concepts but are exemplified in the behavior of representative individuals (both men and women). Rather than seeing various figures in the poem as allegorical, medieval rhetoricians would claim they are metonyms (parts or attributes representing the larger whole). Thus male figures in the poem can be read as representing particular aspects of the (male) poet’s self. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 5., ( 1991):  Pages 31 - 48.
Year of Publication: 1991.

107. Record Number: 11821
Author(s): Green, Richard Firth.
Contributor(s):
Title : An Analogue to the "Marital Dilemma" in the Wife of Bath's Tale [The problem facing the husband at the end of this poem (the choice between an old and faithful wife or a beautiful and potentially fickle one) has an analogue in a later French poem, "Les deux maris et leurs deux femmes." The French poem derives the marital problem from the tradition of Latin rhetoric and debate. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: English Language Notes , 28., 4 (June 1991):  Pages 9 - 12.
Year of Publication: 1991.

108. Record Number: 12736
Author(s): Takacs, Sarolta A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Manuel Philes’ Meditation on an Icon of the Virgin Mary [This devotional poem by the fourteenth century Greek poet represents a progression from a meditation of a concrete object (an icon of the Virgin Mary) to a mystical or metaphysical plane of understanding. The author gives a line by line analysis of the language of the poem, which employs numerous rhetorical devices to connect allusions to the burning bush (which typographically prefigures the Virgin Mary) to imagery of divine fire. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantinische Forschungen , 15., ( 1990):  Pages 277 - 288.
Year of Publication: 1990.