Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


32 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 29887
Author(s): Kueny, Kathryn
Contributor(s):
Title : The Cure of Perfection: Women's Obstetrics in Early and Medieval Islam
Source: Perspectives on Medieval Art: Learning through Looking.   Edited by Ena Giurescu Heller and Patricia C. Pongracz .   Museum of Biblical Art, 2010.  Pages 187 - 197.
Year of Publication: 2010.

2. Record Number: 17111
Author(s): Chibnall, Marjorie
Contributor(s):
Title : The Empress Matilda as a Subject for Biography [The author explores contemporary sources for the life of Empress Matilda, daughter of King Henry I and heir to the throne of England. Chibnall focuses on the events following Henry's death. E. van Houts has suggested that the queen's pregancy caused her to delay her trip to England, but Chibnall argues that Matilda did take action immediately by travelling to Normandy and knew the importance of coronation. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Writing Medieval Biography, 750-1250: Essays in Honour of Professor Frank Barlow.   Edited by David Bates, Julia Crick, and Sarah Hamilton .   Boydell Press, 2006.  Pages 185 - 194.
Year of Publication: 2006.

3. Record Number: 15314
Author(s): Butler, Sara M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Abortion by Assault: Violence against Pregnant Women in Thirteenth and Fourteenth- Century England
Source: Journal of Women's History , 17., 4 ( 2005):  Pages 9 - 31.
Year of Publication: 2005.

4. Record Number: 19231
Author(s): Keller, Hildegard Elisabeth
Contributor(s):
Title : Segreti. Uno studio semantico sulla mistica femminile medievale [Medieval mystics frequently wrote about hidden or secret realities. Didactic texts tried to teach an approach to these secrets, while autobiographies presented mysteries that the mystic had experienced. Female mystics, as well as some men, frequently presented their experience in erotic terms derived from the Bible and including terms for pregnancy and birth. Many of them said they were compelled to reveal secrets they had learned. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Storia delle donne 1 (2005): 201-220.
Year of Publication: 2005.

5. Record Number: 8483
Author(s): Elsakkers, Maríanne.
Contributor(s):
Title : Inflicting Serious Bodily Harm: The Visigothic "Antiquae" on Violence and Abortion [The author analyzes five sections on abortion along with an injury tariff. The author argues that the Visigothic laws are concerned with serious bodily harm to the mothers, not with abortion per se. The situations mostly imply violence done to a pregnant woman against her will causing miscarriages, not women voluntarily selecting abortions. Nonetheless the compensation payments required distinguished between the "unformed" and "formed" fetus. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Tijdschrift voor rechtsgeschiedenis. Revue d'histoire du droit. Legal History Review , 71., 40180 ( 2003):  Pages 55 - 63.
Year of Publication: 2003.

6. Record Number: 9703
Author(s): Howell, Margaret.
Contributor(s):
Title : Royal Women of England and France in the Mid-Thirteenth Century: A Gendered Perspective [The author examines the lives of twelve royal women associated with Henry III, King of England, and Louis IX, King of France. Howell analyzes various issues conditioned by gender including motherhood, relations with husbands, intercession, and political power. She concludes that for queens like Isabella of Angoulme, Blanche of Castile, Marguerite of Provence, Eleanor of Castile, and Eleanor of Provence, marriage brought lives that were varied, interesting, and satisfying. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: England and Europe in the Reign of Henry III (1216-1272).   Edited by Bjšrn K. U. Weiler with Ifor W. Rowlands .   Ashgate, 2002. Tijdschrift voor rechtsgeschiedenis. Revue d'histoire du droit. Legal History Review , 71., 40180 ( 2003):  Pages 163 - 181.
Year of Publication: 2002.

7. Record Number: 6616
Author(s): Johnson, Geraldine A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Beautiful Brides and Model Mothers: The Devotional and Talismanic Functions of Early Modern Marian Reliefs [The author discusses fifteenth century madonna and child reliefs in regard to their production, devotional uses, levels of contemplation evoked, and as magical objects for marriage and the procreation of male babies].
Source: The Material Culture of Sex, Procreation, and Marriage in Premodern Europe.   Edited by Anne L. McClanan and Karen Rosoff Encarnación .   Palgrave, 2002. Tijdschrift voor rechtsgeschiedenis. Revue d'histoire du droit. Legal History Review , 71., 40180 ( 2003):  Pages 135 - 161.
Year of Publication: 2002.

8. Record Number: 5372
Author(s): Poorthuis, Marcel and Chana Safrai
Contributor(s):
Title : Fresh Water for a Tired Soul: Pregnancy and Messianic Desire in a Mediaeval Jewish Document from Sicily [The authors examine a text in Hebrew from the Cairo Geniza that describes three events full of Messianic promise; the first event involves a pregnant Jewish woman who experiences visions and calls on Jews to repent].
Source: Women and Miracle Stories: A Multidisciplinary Exploration.   Edited by Anne-Marie Korte Studies in the History of Religions, 88.   Brill, 2001. Tijdschrift voor rechtsgeschiedenis. Revue d'histoire du droit. Legal History Review , 71., 40180 ( 2003):  Pages 123 - 144.
Year of Publication: 2001.

9. Record Number: 6632
Author(s): Skemer, Don C.
Contributor(s):
Title : Amulet Rolls and Female Devotion in the Late Middle Ages [medieval written amulets in scroll form rarely survive, but those that do frequently are intended to guarantee safety in pregnancy and childbirth; these amulets might be read aloud, bound to the woman or even fed to her; many of the surviving rolls are dedicated to Margaret of Antioch, the patron saint of pregnant women; this article edits one such roll (with the Latin text presented in the appendix) and provides a plate with a picture of the original; its mention of Saint Sigismund, a Burgundian martyr, may point to an origin in or near the ancient Burgundian realm; some of the charms are general ones, intended to provide generalized protection; but others make specific reference to childbirth, the greatest period of danger in many women's lives; other religious objects, including books of hours, were expected to serve similar protective purposes].
Source: Scriptorium , 55., 2 ( 2001):  Pages 197 - 227.
Year of Publication: 2001.

10. Record Number: 5858
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Weasels and Pregnancy in Renaissance Italy
Source: Renaissance studies : journal of the Society for Renaissance Studies , 15., 2 (June 2001):  Pages 172 - 187.
Year of Publication: 2001.

11. Record Number: 3929
Author(s): Kim, Susan.
Contributor(s):
Title : Bloody Signs: Circumcision and Pregnancy in the Old English Judith [The author argues that the beheading of Holofernes can be read as a castration or circumcision while the severed head of Holofernes figures as the result of Judith's symbolic pregnancy].
Source: Exemplaria: A Journal of Theory in Medieval and Renaissance Studies , 11., 2 (Spring 1999):  Pages 285 - 307.
Year of Publication: 1999.

12. Record Number: 3608
Author(s): Cartlidge, Neil.
Contributor(s):
Title : Alas, I Go with Chylde : Representations of Extra-Marital Pregnancy in the Middle English Lyric
Source: English Studies , 79., 2 ( 1998):  Pages 395 - 414.
Year of Publication: 1998.

13. Record Number: 5436
Author(s): Galloway, Andrew.
Contributor(s):
Title : Intellectual Pregnancy, Metaphysical Femininity, and the Social Doctrine of the Trinity in "Piers Plowman"
Source: Yearbook of Langland Studies , 12., ( 1998):  Pages 117 - 152.
Year of Publication: 1998.

14. Record Number: 1817
Author(s): Gilbert, Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Practice of Gender in "Aucassin et Nicolette"
Source: Forum for Modern Language Studies , 33., 3 (July 1997):  Pages 217 - 228.
Year of Publication: 1997.

15. Record Number: 3668
Author(s): Musacchio, Jacqueline Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Imaginative Conceptions in Renaissance Italy [The author argues that women were encouraged to fulfill their maternal role through a wide variety of images and objects that emphasized the delivery of healthy, male babies].
Source: Picturing Women in Renaissance and Baroque Italy.   Edited by Geraldine A. Johnson and Sara F. Mathews Grieco .   Cambridge University Press, 1997. Forum for Modern Language Studies , 33., 3 (July 1997):  Pages 42 - 60.
Year of Publication: 1997.

16. Record Number: 4344
Author(s): Biller, Peter.
Contributor(s):
Title : Cathars and Material Women [The author explores the historiography of the issue and calls into question the idea that Cathars offered positive roles for women].
Source: Medieval Theology and the Natural Body.   Edited by Peter Biller and A.J. Minnis York Studies in Medieval Theology .   York Medieval Press, 1997. Forum for Modern Language Studies , 33., 3 (July 1997):  Pages 61 - 107.
Year of Publication: 1997.

17. Record Number: 3580
Author(s): Parsons, John Carmi.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Pregnant Queen as Counsellor and the Medieval Construction of Motherhood
Source: Medieval Mothering.   Edited by John Carmi Parsons and Bonnie Wheeler .   Garland Publishing, 1996. Forum for Modern Language Studies , 33., 3 (July 1997):  Pages 39 - 61.
Year of Publication: 1996.

18. Record Number: 257
Author(s): Everest, Carol.
Contributor(s):
Title : Paradys or Helle: Pleasure and Procreation in Chaucer's "Merchant's Tale"
Source: Sovereign Lady: Essays on Women in Middle English Literature.   Edited by Muriel Whitaker .   Garland Publishing, 1995. Forum for Modern Language Studies , 33., 3 (July 1997):  Pages 63 - 84.
Year of Publication: 1995.

19. Record Number: 3497
Author(s): Thyrêt, Isolde.
Contributor(s):
Title : Blessed is the Tsaritsa's Womb: The Myth of Miraculous Birth and Royal Motherhood in Muscovite Russia [The author argues that the tsaritsas developed the idea of miraculous conceptions to give them some protection from the political pressures of producing an heir]
Source: Russian Review (Full Text via JSTOR) 53, 4 (Oct. 1994): 479-496. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1994.

20. Record Number: 8539
Author(s): Mafart, Bertrand- Yves.
Contributor(s):
Title : Approche de la mortalité maternelle au moyen âge en provence
Source: La Femme pendant le Moyen Âge et l'époque moderne. Actes des Sixiémes Journées Anthropologiques de Valbonne 9-10-11 juin 1992.   Edited by Luc Buchet Dossier de Documentation Archéologique, 17.   CNRS (Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, Centre de Recherches Archéologiques) Éditions, 1994. Forum for Modern Language Studies , 33., 3 (July 1997):  Pages 207 - 219.
Year of Publication: 1994.

21. Record Number: 7243
Author(s): Bitel, Lisa M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Conceived in Sins, Born in Delights: Stories of Procreation from Early Ireland [The author argues that the surviving narratives of sex, conception, pregnancy, and childbirth from eight and ninth-century Ireland represent an exclusively male ideology, and reveal masculine attempts to co-opt the procreative process more generally. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the History of Sexuality , 3., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 181 - 202.
Year of Publication: 1992.

22. Record Number: 10519
Author(s): Thomasset, Claude.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Nature of Woman [The author provides an overview of medieval representations of women and sexuality through medical treatises (texts concerning female anatomy and physiology) and related writings by theologians and physicians. Galen’s theory that the female internal organs were the inverse of the male sexual organ was very influential, but writers developed diverse and contradictory opinions on the nature of female sex organs, the function of menstrual blood, and the process of determining the gender of a fetus during pregnancy. Writers also expressed anxiety about the ways women shared sexual knowledge with each other, how women derived pleasures from sex, and what caused various illnesses in women. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Journal of the History of Sexuality , 3., 2 ( 1992):  Pages 43 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1992.

23. Record Number: 8005
Author(s): Howes, Laura L.
Contributor(s):
Title : On the Birth of Margey Kempe's Last Child [The author suggests that Margery Kempe was pregnant with her last child when she left England in 1413 on pilgrimage. Her schedule, involving a long wait in Venice for a ship to Jerusalem, would have allowed her to give birth before sailing east. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Modern Philology (Full Text via JSTOR) 90, 2 (November 1992): 220-225. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1992.

24. Record Number: 8869
Author(s): Weiss-Amer, Melitta.
Contributor(s):
Title : Dietetics of Pregnancy: A Fifteenth Century Perspective [The author examines a text by Heinrich von Laufenberg, a German cleric, who took the European learned tradition of medicine and adapted it to the purposes of the Church. Heinrich emphasized the importance of both mother and child but maintained that the pregnant woman needed male advice. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 19., ( 1992):  Pages 301 - 318.
Year of Publication: 1992.

25. Record Number: 12690
Author(s): Brown, Russell E.
Contributor(s):
Title : Pregnancy in Classical and Medieval Literature [The author notes the absence of pregnancy in Arthurian romances and compares it to a similar lack in Greek epic and drama. Brown suggests the genres' emphases on the ideal and on timelessness may account for pregnancies not being depicted. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Neophilologus , 75., ( 1991):  Pages 321 - 326.
Year of Publication: 1991.

26. Record Number: 12743
Author(s): Keefer, Sarah Larratt.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Monastic Echo in an Old English Charm [The Old English metrical poem most commonly known as “Charm for Delayed Birth” is often interpreted as a magical incantation intended to protect a woman from a spontaneous miscarriage or stillbirth. Although the poem may have origins in pagan practices, the poem’s references to Bethlehem and the Nativity give it Christian relevance. Moreover, the poem repeatedly echoes monastic references to scripture and liturgy, giving the poem an oral quality that could serve a prayerful or devotional purpose instead of just being a pagan incantation with Christian terminology. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Leeds Studies in English , 21., ( 1990):  Pages 71 - 80.
Year of Publication: 1990.

27. Record Number: 28831
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Madonna del Parto
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/1/10/Madonna_del_parto_piero_della_Francesca.jpg/250px-Madonna_del_parto_piero_della_Francesca.jpg
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28. Record Number:
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Contributor(s):
Title : Ghent Altarpiece, detail: Eve
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/6/64/Jan_van_Eyck_-_The_Ghent_Altarpiece_-_Eve_-_WGA07637.jpg/250px-Jan_van_Eyck_-_The_Ghent_Altarpiece_-_Eve_-_WGA07637.jpg
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29. Record Number:
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Contributor(s):
Title : September
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30. Record Number: 31390
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Diagram of a pregnant woman, with fetus and diseases
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31. Record Number: 31427
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Four fetal positions in utero
Source:
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32. Record Number: 35959
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Cantiga 7 The pregnant abbess
Source:
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