Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


4 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 4809
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Origins of Criseyde
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000.  Pages 131 - 147.
Year of Publication: 2000.

2. Record Number: 6407
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : E' ti saluto con amore. Messaggi amorosi epistolari nella letteratura Arturiana in Italia [the love letter, as a literary genre, has its roots in Ovid's "Heroides," and Arthurian love letters can be found in twelfth century France; Italian Arthurian literature soon had its own love letters, many tied to the Tristan or Lancelot cycle; the Ovidian tradition was fused with the forms of the "Ars dictaminis," the standard method of drafting letters].
Source: Medioevo Romanzo , 23., ( 1999):  Pages 277 - 298.
Year of Publication: 1999.

3. Record Number: 6391
Author(s): Derla, Luigi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesca, una Beatrice incompiuta (INF V 73-143) [Dante's Francesca da Rimini is an example of heroic love; the poet found precedents in Ovid's "Heroides" and Virgil's portrait of Dido; Francesca and Paolo fit the stereotype of courtly lovers, but Dante's opinion of their surrender to passion is negative, because they separated themselves from God; Francesca, the earthly woman, is contrasted with Beatrice, the heavenly one, with Francesca being an incomplete version of the other].
Source: Italian Quarterly , 34., (Summer-Fall 1997):  Pages 5 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1997.

4. Record Number: 5584
Author(s): Trotta, Stefania.
Contributor(s):
Title : L "Elegia di Madonna Fiammetta" di Giovanni Boccaccio e un volgarizzamento delle "Epistulae heroidum" di Ovidio attribuito a Filippo Ceffi [Boccaccio knew the classics in both Latin and Italian versions; among his sources for the "Elegia" was the translation attributed to Filippo Ceffi, the most widely read Italian version of Ovid's "Epistulae;" Boccaccio's vocabulary and syntax both show similarities to Ceffi's].
Source: Italia Medioevale e Umanistica , 38., ( 1995):  Pages 217 - 261.
Year of Publication: 1995.