Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


25 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 9179
Author(s): Holsinger, Bruce and David Townsend
Contributor(s):
Title : Ovidian Homoerotics in Twelfth-century Paris: The Letters of Leoninus, Poet and Polyphone [The authors analyze two Latin poems by Leoninus, a cathedral canon in Paris. Leoninus uses echoes from Ovid not only to establish a playful, loving exchange with his male addressees but, according to Holsinger and Townsend, to celebrate male-male sexual consummation as "a noble and ennobling pursuit." The Appendix presents the Latin texts of the two poems from Bibliothèque nationale MS Latin 14759 ("On a Ring Given by Cardinal Henry" and "To a Friend Who Will Come for the Festival of the Staff") along with English translations. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: GLQ: A Journal of Lesbian and Gay Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 8, 3 (2002): 389-423. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2002.

2. Record Number: 6401
Author(s): Borgerding, Todd M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sic ego te dilegebam: Music, Homoeroticism, and the Sacred in Early Modern Europe [The motet "Planxit autem David," sometimes attributed to Josquin Desprez, can be read as expressing, in both text and music, a homosexual relationship between David and Jonathan; this would place the motet in the same context as the homoerotic myth of Ganymede and the depiction of Orpheus by Ovid as turning to the love of young men after his loss of Eurydice; the emphasis upon the name of Jonathan in this composition can be read as supporting such an interpretation; the Appendix presents the Latin text as set by Josquin Desprez along with an English translation].
Source: Gender, Sexuality, and Early Music.   Edited by Todd M. Borgerding .   Routledge, 2002.  Pages 249 - 263.
Year of Publication: 2002.

3. Record Number: 7908
Author(s): Jones, Nancy A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Daughter's Text and the Thread of Lineage in the Old French "Philomena"
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001.  Pages 161 - 187.
Year of Publication: 2001.

4. Record Number: 7907
Author(s): Burns, E. Jane.
Contributor(s):
Title : Raping Men: What's Motherhood Got to Do with It?
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001.  Pages 127 - 160.
Year of Publication: 2001.

5. Record Number: 7910
Author(s): Schotter, Anne Howland.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rape in the Medieval Latin Comedies
Source: Representing Rape in Medieval and Early Modern Literature.   Edited by Elizabeth Robertson and Christine M. Rose .   The New Middle Ages Series. Palgrave, 2001.  Pages 241 - 253.
Year of Publication: 2001.

6. Record Number: 4809
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : The Origins of Criseyde
Source: Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts in Late Medieval Britain. Essays for Felicity Riddy.   Edited by Jocelyn Wogan-Browne, Rosalynn Voaden, Arlyn Diamond, Ann Hutchison, Carol M. Meale, and Lesley Johnson Medieval Women: Texts and Contexts .   Brepols, 2000.  Pages 131 - 147.
Year of Publication: 2000.

7. Record Number: 5532
Author(s): Heller, Sarah-Grace.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fashioning a Woman: The Vernacular Pygmalion in the "Roman de la Rose" ["As with conventions of rhetoric and erotic play, Jean de Meun's Pygmalion tale exploits conventional textile-acquiring and dressing fantasies, knowing that as conventions they appeal to readers. At the same time, he derides them, using hyperbole and the irony of the Pygmalion legend itself to expose the vain artifice that lurks behind the convention" Page 13].
Source: Medievalia et Humanistica New Series , 27., ( 2000):  Pages 1 - 18. Literacy and the Lay Reader
Year of Publication: 2000.

8. Record Number: 7439
Author(s): Giovini, Marco.
Contributor(s):
Title : O admirabile Veneris ydolum: un carme d'amore paidico del X secolo e il mito di Deucalione ["O admirabile Veneris ydolum" is the oldest surviving Latin love poem from the Middle Ages. The poem is a pastiche of classical allusions. Among these is a reference to the tale of Deucalion and Pyrrha who repopulated the earth by throwing stones (the bones of Mother Earth) over their shoulders. The poet knew this story through Ovid. The article includes the text of the Latin poem and an Italian translation. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Studi Medievali , 40., 1 (Giugno 1999):  Pages 261 - 278.
Year of Publication: 1999.

9. Record Number: 6407
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : E' ti saluto con amore. Messaggi amorosi epistolari nella letteratura Arturiana in Italia [the love letter, as a literary genre, has its roots in Ovid's "Heroides," and Arthurian love letters can be found in twelfth century France; Italian Arthurian literature soon had its own love letters, many tied to the Tristan or Lancelot cycle; the Ovidian tradition was fused with the forms of the "Ars dictaminis," the standard method of drafting letters].
Source: Medioevo Romanzo , 23., ( 1999):  Pages 277 - 298.
Year of Publication: 1999.

10. Record Number: 2934
Author(s): Gertz, Sun Hee Kim.
Contributor(s):
Title : Echoes and Reflections of Enigmatic Beauty in Ovid and Marie de France
Source: Speculum , 73., 2 (April 1998):  Pages 372 - 396.
Year of Publication: 1998.

11. Record Number: 6391
Author(s): Derla, Luigi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Francesca, una Beatrice incompiuta (INF V 73-143) [Dante's Francesca da Rimini is an example of heroic love; the poet found precedents in Ovid's "Heroides" and Virgil's portrait of Dido; Francesca and Paolo fit the stereotype of courtly lovers, but Dante's opinion of their surrender to passion is negative, because they separated themselves from God; Francesca, the earthly woman, is contrasted with Beatrice, the heavenly one, with Francesca being an incomplete version of the other].
Source: Italian Quarterly , 34., (Summer-Fall 1997):  Pages 5 - 20.
Year of Publication: 1997.

12. Record Number: 1994
Author(s): Calabrese, Michael.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ovid and the Female Voice in the "De Amore" and the "Letters" of Abelard and Heloise
Source: Modern Philology (Full Text via JSTOR) 95, 1 (August 1997): 1-26. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1997.

13. Record Number: 7939
Author(s): Baldassarri, Stefano Ugo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Adfluit incautis insidiosus amor: la precettistica Ovidiana nel "Filostrato" di Boccaccio [Boccaccio's "Filostrato" makes extensive use of Ovid's works, particularly in its account of Troilus and Criseyde. Ovid's "Heroides" was a particular source for the account of Helena and Paris. "Filostrato" was a youthful work, more dependent on classical models than were Boccaccio's mature writings.]
Source: Rivista di Studi Italiani , 14., 2 (Dicembre 1996):  Pages 20 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1996.

14. Record Number: 3640
Author(s): Richards, Earl Jeffrey.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rejecting Essentialism and Gendered Writing: The Case of Christine de Pizan [Christine de Pizan challenges the misogyny inherent in medieval literary culture].
Source: Gender and Text in the Later Middle Ages.   Edited by Jane Chance .   University Press of Florida, 1996. Rivista di Studi Italiani , 14., 2 (Dicembre 1996):  Pages 96 - 131.
Year of Publication: 1996.

15. Record Number: 1724
Author(s): Kinkade, Richard P.
Contributor(s):
Title : A Thirteenth- Century Precursor of the "Libro de Buen Amor" : The "Art d' Amors" [both works combine elements of the fabliau, courtly romance, and sermon literature for a learned, clerical audience].
Source: Corónica , 24., 2 (Spring 1996):  Pages 123 - 139.
Year of Publication: 1996.

16. Record Number: 5997
Author(s): Corfis, Ivy A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Celestina and the Conflict of Ovidian and Courtly Love [The author argues that Fernando de Rojas calls on Ovid and Andreas Capellanus in order to mock their codes of love which no longer work and cause damage to society].
Source: Bulletin of Hispanic Studies (University of Glasgow) , 73., 4 (October 1996):  Pages 395 - 417.
Year of Publication: 1996.

17. Record Number: 5134
Author(s): Gertz, Sun Hee Kim.
Contributor(s):
Title : Transforming Lovers and Memorials in Ovid and Marie de France
Source: Florilegium , 14., ( 1995- 1996):  Pages 99 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1995- 1996.

18. Record Number: 5584
Author(s): Trotta, Stefania.
Contributor(s):
Title : L "Elegia di Madonna Fiammetta" di Giovanni Boccaccio e un volgarizzamento delle "Epistulae heroidum" di Ovidio attribuito a Filippo Ceffi [Boccaccio knew the classics in both Latin and Italian versions; among his sources for the "Elegia" was the translation attributed to Filippo Ceffi, the most widely read Italian version of Ovid's "Epistulae;" Boccaccio's vocabulary and syntax both show similarities to Ceffi's].
Source: Italia Medioevale e Umanistica , 38., ( 1995):  Pages 217 - 261.
Year of Publication: 1995.

19. Record Number: 4430
Author(s): Pelen, Marc M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Providence and Incest Reconsidered: Chaucer's Poetic Judgment of His Man of Law
Source: Papers on Language and Literature , 30., 2 (Spring 1994):  Pages 132 - 156.
Year of Publication: 1994.

20. Record Number: 1411
Author(s): Koubena, Elizabeth.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Lover's Cure in Ovid's "Remedia Amoris" and Chaucer's "Miller's Tale" [it requires that the lover experience the foulness of the naked female body].
Source: English Language Notes , 32., 1 (September 1994):  Pages 13 - 18.
Year of Publication: 1994.

21. Record Number: 10969
Author(s): Troncarelli, Fabio.
Contributor(s):
Title : Immoderatus amor: Abelardo, Eloisa e Andrea Cappellano [The letters of Abelard and Heloise, in their final form, share ideas and vocabulary with the "De amore" of Andreas Capellanus. In part they draw on common sources, including Ovid, Aristotle, Augustine, and Jerome in an eclectic mix. The idea that lovers
Source: Quaderni Medievali , 34., ( 1992):  Pages 6 - 58.
Year of Publication: 1992.

22. Record Number: 10019
Author(s): Schotter, Anne H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Rhetoric versus rape in the medieval Latin Pamphilus [The author examines language and force as instruments of power in the "Pamphilus." Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Philological Quarterly , 71., 2 (Spring 1992):  Pages 243 - 260.
Year of Publication: 1992.

23. Record Number: 11070
Author(s): Huot, Sylvia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Daisy and the Laurel: Myths of Desire and Creativity in the Poetry of John Froissart [Froissart’s poetic persona fuses the identities of the cleric and the lover, and thus his poetry is both learned and secular. He adapts Ovidian myths (particularly those focusing on Apollo, a figure of both poetry and wisdom) to construct a mythographic basis for his intellectualized poetic identity and love psychology. At the same time, he adapts numerous mythic allusions to transform the daisy into a symbol of erotic desire, loss, and memory. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Yale French Studies (Full Text via JSTOR) (1991): 240-251. Special Editions: Style and Values in Medieval Art and Literature.Link Info
Year of Publication: 1991.

24. Record Number: 10683
Author(s): Heinrichs, Katherine.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mythological Lovers in Chaucer's "Trolius and Criseyde" [Chaucer makes many allusions to well-known figures from classical mythology in this poem, and medieval readers were familiar with the meanings of these references. For instance, when Chaucer's fickle Criseyde mentions Oenone (a female figure from Ovid's "Heroides"), medieval readers would have been reminded of medieval glosses of the "Heroides" that interpret Oenone as exemplum of foolish love. Allusions to other mythological lovers like Tereus and Procne, Orpheus and Eurydice, and Myrrha similarly serve as exampla for love as a disastrous and socially destructive force. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Journal of the Rocky Mountain Medieval and Renaissance Association , 12., ( 1991):  Pages 13 - 59.
Year of Publication: 1991.

25. Record Number: 28929
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Pyramus and Thisbe
Source: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/3/33/Cambrai_221109_02_Pyrame_et_Thisb%C3%A9.jpg/250px-Cambrai_221109_02_Pyrame_et_Thisb%C3%A9.jpg
Year of Publication: