Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


23 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 9514
Author(s): Smith, Julia M. H.
Contributor(s):
Title : Einhard: The Sinner and the Saints (Read 15 March 2002)
Source: Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. Sixth Series , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 55 - 77.
Year of Publication: 2003.

2. Record Number: 11022
Author(s): Johnston, Mark.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gender as Conduct in the Courtesy Guides for Aristocratic Boys and Girls of Amanieu de Sescás [Amanieu de Sescás wrote his poems of advice for young women and young men in the early 1290s. Johnston argues that while a few behaviors are gender specific, the poet generally emphasizes a common ethic of courtliness for nobles of both sexes. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Essays in Medieval Studies (Full Text via Project Muse) 20 (2003): 75-84. Link Info
Year of Publication: 2003.

3. Record Number: 9501
Author(s): Lee, Becky R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Men's Recollections of a Women's Rite: Medieval English Men's Recollections Regarding the Rite of the Purification of Women after Childbirth
Source: Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 224 - 241.
Year of Publication: 2002.

4. Record Number: 8803
Author(s): Karras, Ruth Mazo.
Contributor(s):
Title : Young Knights under the Feminine Gaze ["The women served a ratifying function for a youth's entry into a masculine hierarchy of knightly prestige, but they did not themselves choose the criteria by which they evaluated men. A woman's gaze at a young knight was not a sign of her activity as opposed to his passivity, but rather the sign that she was the prize he was to win, the currency in which his worth in other men's eyes was to be measured." Page 203.]
Source: The Premodern Teenager: Youth in Society, 1150-1650.   Edited by Konrad Eisenbichler .   Publications of the Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, Essays and Studies, 1. Centre for Reformation and Renaissance Studies, 2002. Transactions of the Royal Historical Society. Sixth Series , 13., ( 2003):  Pages 189 - 205.
Year of Publication: 2002.

5. Record Number: 3748
Author(s): Nelson, J. L.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monks, Secular Men, and Masculinity, c.900 [case studies of elite young men who scrupled over the masculine role models in the secular world].
Source: Masculinity in Medieval Europe.   Edited by D.M. Hadley .   Women and Men in History Series. Addison Wesley Longman, 1999. Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 121 - 142.
Year of Publication: 1999.

6. Record Number: 3745
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Military Masculinity in England and Northern France c.1050 - c.1225 [the ideal aristocratic warrior was physically and morally complete, adept at war, and loyal, but above all he had deep friendships with his warrior companions].
Source: Masculinity in Medieval Europe.   Edited by D.M. Hadley .   Women and Men in History Series. Addison Wesley Longman, 1999. Gender and History , 14., 2 (August 2002):  Pages 71 - 88.
Year of Publication: 1999.

7. Record Number: 4410
Author(s): Lacarra Lanz, Eukene.
Contributor(s):
Title : Political Discourse and the Construction and Representation of Gender in "Mocedades de Rodrigo" [The author concludes "The construction of masculinity, as it apears in 'MR,' is predicated on the marginalization of women, who are viewed exclusively as commodities circulating among men." (page 487)].
Source: Hispanic Review , 67., ( 1999):  Pages 467 - 491.
Year of Publication: 1999.

8. Record Number: 3752
Author(s): Chinca, M.
Contributor(s):
Title : Women and Hunting-Birds are Easy to Tame: Aristocratic Masculinity and the Early German Love-Lyric [the author suggests two different interpretations of Der Von Kürenberg's lyrics; the first assumes an exclusively male audience and gives the songs the role of reproducing and reinforcing patriarchal masculinity while the second model posits a mixed audience interested in debating masculinity.]
Source: Masculinity in Medieval Europe.   Edited by D.M. Hadley .   Women and Men in History Series. Addison Wesley Longman, 1999. Hispanic Review , 67., ( 1999):  Pages 199 - 213.
Year of Publication: 1999.

9. Record Number: 2972
Author(s): Chojnacki, Stanley.
Contributor(s):
Title : Daughters and Oligarchs: Gender and the Early Renaissance State [argues that the state intervened to define the roles of men and women; studies the efforts to keep nuns' convents chaste and respectable, to control the ever rising cost of dowries, and to control the members of the male elite].
Source: Gender and Society in Renaissance Italy.   Edited by Judith C. Brown and Robert C. Davis .   Longman, 1998. Hispanic Review , 67., ( 1999):  Pages 63 - 86. Republished in slightly altered form as Gender and the Early Renaissance State. By Stanley Chojnacki. Women and Men in Renaissance Venice: Twelve Essays on Patrician Society. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. Pages 27-52.
Year of Publication: 1998.

10. Record Number: 2556
Author(s): Brown, Elizabeth A. R.
Contributor(s):
Title : Ritual Brotherhood in Western Medieval Europe [discussion of compacts and ceremonies, the secular nature of the evidence in contrast to Byzantine liturgies, and the social and political aspects including the unlikelihood of a sexual relationship].
Source: Traditio , 52., ( 1997):  Pages 357 - 381.
Year of Publication: 1997.

11. Record Number: 1866
Author(s): Mullally, Evelyn.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Portrayal of Women in the "Histoire de Guillaume le Maréchal"
Source: Peritia: Journal of the Medieval Academy of Ireland , 10., ( 1996):  Pages 351 - 362.
Year of Publication: 1996.

12. Record Number: 1366
Author(s): Pasteur, Claude.
Contributor(s):
Title : Jean d'Aulon, écuyer de Jeanne d'Arc, ne pourra la sauver [article does not include footnotes or bibliography of sources consulted].
Source: Historia , 579., (mars 1995):  Pages 80 - 81.
Year of Publication: 1995.

13. Record Number: 8587
Author(s): Kennedy, Craig.
Contributor(s):
Title : Fathers, Sons, and Brothers: Ties of Metaphorical Kinship Between the Muscovite Grand Princes and the Tatar Elite [The author examines the connections established between Muscovite princes and Mongol allies. He argues that the hierarchy in family relationships was useful for conveying political status. Since both cultures gave similar meanings to birth order and age, it worked well. In some cases multiple connections (e.g. son and brother) were established when the relationship was somehwat ambiguous. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Harvard Ukrainian Studies , 19., ( 1995):  Pages 292 - 301. Kamen' Kraeog "I'n": Rhetoric of the Medieval Slavic World: Essays Presented to Edward L. Keenan on His Sixtieth Birthday by His Colleagues and Students. Edited by Nancy Shields Kollmann, Donald Ostrowski, Andrei Pliguzov, and Daniel Rowland.
Year of Publication: 1995.

14. Record Number: 3558
Author(s): Chojnacki, Stanley.
Contributor(s):
Title : Subaltern Patriarchs: Patrician Bachelors in Renaissance Venice [The author argues that unmarried male patricians had a lesser status than their brothers who married and became heads of families; nonetheless bachelors shared in the privileges of the patriarchal society including government offices].
Source: Medieval Masculinities: Regarding Men in the Middle Ages.   Edited by Clare A. Lees with the assistance of Thelma Fenster and Jo Ann McNamara Medieval Cultures, 7.   University of Minnesota Press, 1994. Mediaevistik , 7., ( 1994):  Pages 73 - 90. Republished in slightly altered form as Subaltern Patriarchs: Patrician Bachelors. By Stanley Chojnacki. Women and Men in Renaissance Venice: Twelve Essays on Patrician Society. Johns Hopkins University Press, 2000. Pages 244-256.
Year of Publication: 1994.

15. Record Number: 5568
Author(s): De Gendt, Anne Marie.
Contributor(s):
Title : Gens qui ont le siècle à main: les grands de ce monde dans le "Livre du Chevalier de la Tour Landry" [the author analyzes two incidents in the "Livre du Chevalier de la Tour Landry" in which men betray women by pledging their love to several women at the same time; despite the Chevalier de la Tour Landry's moral and didactic purposes, he admires the men's high social statuses, their gifts for speaking, and even their reputations as seducers].
Source: Fifteenth Century Studies , 21., ( 1994):  Pages 1 - 15.
Year of Publication: 1994.

16. Record Number: 2848
Author(s): Sommé, Monique.
Contributor(s):
Title : Des Alliances liées à la procréation: Les fonctions du mariage dans les Pays-Bas Bourguignons [based on the writings of four chroniclers, Jean, lord of Haynin, Mathieu d'Escouchy, Jacques du Clercq, and Olivier, lord of La Marche].
Source: Mediaevistik , 7., ( 1994):  Pages 11 - 69.
Year of Publication: 1994.

17. Record Number: 10526
Author(s): Duby, Georges.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Courtly Model [In the model of courtly love that emerged in twelfth-century France, the aristocratic man submits completely to the will of the exalted “domna” (lady). The author examines whether this model of male-female relations (which appears to give the woman great power) actually resulted in a change in social attitudes toward women or an improvement in their condition. Aristocrats adopted the courtly love model from troubadour poetry and other forms of literature, and practicing courtly love allowed noble men to prove their masculinity through displays like tournaments. Although the condition of women improved by means of the courtly love paradigm, the status of men improved as well so the distance between the sexes remained largely the same. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: A History of Women in the West. Volume 2: Silences of the Middle Ages.   Edited by Christiane Klapisch-Zuber .   Belknap Press of Harvard University Press, 1992. Fifteenth Century Studies , 21., ( 1994):  Pages 250 - 266.
Year of Publication: 1992.

18. Record Number: 12752
Author(s): Heslop, T. A.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Production of De Luxe Manuscripts and the Patronage of King Cnut and Queen Emma [Many lavishly illustrated English Gospel books and devotional manuscripts were produced during the reign of King Cnut and Queen Emma. These luxury items were produced with royal money with the intent that they would be given as presents to powerful individuals in order to help secure allegiance to the crown or they were given (alongside valuable relics or artwork) to institutions like monasteries and churches in order to convey the donors’ piety. Evidence from the handwriting and illumination of Gospel books during the period suggests a large scale production by monastic scribes and artists who worked in close collaboration. Three Appendices. Appendix One lists lavishly illuminated Anglo-Saxon Gospels, 990-1030, with the name of the manuscript, its scribe(s), probable origin, and earliest known medieval ownership. Appendix Two provides excerpts from Latin accounts that give evidence of patronage of art and donation of relics by Cnut and Emma. Appendix Three gives bibliographical information on the Besancon and Copenhagen Gospel books, including information on foliation, ruling, scribes, artists, production sequence, date and origin. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Anglo-Saxon England , 19., ( 1990):  Pages 151 - 195.
Year of Publication: 1990.

19. Record Number: 12734
Author(s): Barber, Charles.
Contributor(s):
Title : The imperial panels at San Vitale: a reconsideration [Two sixth century mosaics in the aspe of San Vitale in Ravenna, Italy, depict the Byzantine Emperor Justinian I (on the left) and his wife Theodora (on the right). Although the Emperor and Empress appear to be represented identically (with purple clothing, haloes, and similar postures), other types of iconography in the panels differentiate the role and status of the figures according to their gender. The Emperor, flanked by priests and soldiers, carries objects that indicate his priestly and military roles. The Empress, dressed in more lavish clothing and jewels and enclosed in a depiction of architectural space, reflects Byzantine society’s legal and social relegation of women (even aristocratic ones) to the domestic sphere. Nonetheless, Theodora’s position in image (in the center with males on one side of her, females, on the other) places her at the boundary between the sexes, as a transgressive figure who straddles both public and private spheres. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Byzantine and Modern Greek Studies , 14., ( 1990):  Pages 19 - 42.
Year of Publication: 1990.

20. Record Number: 11194
Author(s): Rollo, David.
Contributor(s):
Title : Sexual Escapades and Poetic Process: Three Poems by William IX of Aquitaine [The writings of the nobleman and poet William of Aquitaine subverts many of the conventions of courtly love poetry, as the elevated. chaste “domna” (lady) of troubadour poetry is sometimes characterized as promiscuous or bestial, and the poetry continually shifts between bawdy and meditative registers. Although the poems can be read as the narrator’s boasting over sexual exploits, some of the language in the poems suggests an underlying theme of male impotence. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Romanic Review , 81., 3 ( 1990):  Pages 293 - 311.
Year of Publication: 1990.

21. Record Number: 12698
Author(s): Turner, Ralph V.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Children of Anglo-Norman Royalty and Their Upbringing [Although royals did demonstrate affection toward their children (both legitimate and illegitimate), aristocratic parents did not consider childcare their primary responsibility. Although noblewomen participated in the education of children, they saw other roles as more important: supervising household affairs, acting as regents when their husbands were away, giving birth to heirs, and negotiating marriage alliances for their sons and daughters. Many other people (including household servants, nurses, and relatives) shared the responsibility of childrearing. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Medieval Prosopography , 11., 2 (Autumn 1990):  Pages 17 - 52.
Year of Publication: 1990.

22. Record Number: 11192
Author(s): Harris, Barbara J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Property, Power, and Personal Relations: Elite Mothers and Sons in Yorkist and Early Tudor England [Women were often marginalized by patriarchal power structures that placed the father at the head of the family, but the birth of a son often elevated the wife’s position. Since the first son was greatly valued in a system of primogenitural inheritance, noble mothers often had close emotional ties to their sons. The political and social future of the family often rested on the mother’s ability to manage the household, display the family’s wealth and status, and negotiate marriages and other alliances for the family’s children. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Signs: Journal of Women in Culture and Society (Full Text via JSTOR) 15, 3 (Spring 1990): 606-632. Link Info
Year of Publication: 1990.

23. Record Number: 12738
Author(s): Gunnes, Erik.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Foundation of the Brigittine Monastery of Munkeliv, and its Struggle for Existence [Saint Michael’s monastery at Nordnes was one of Norway’s richest and exclusive monasteries before the Black Death. Although the monastery was founded by a Swedish nobleman named Sten Stenarsson, its location near the commercial town of Bergen, populated by many Germans, led to an increasing amount of German monks housed there. By the late fifteenth century the monastery was in decline and functioned as retirement residence for wealthy townspeople, and its last inhabitants were likely women from prominent Norwegian families. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Collegium Medievale , 3., 2 ( 1990):  Pages 111 - 122.
Year of Publication: 1990.