Feminae: Medieval Women and Gender Index


19 Record(s) Found in our database

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1. Record Number: 28190
Author(s): Chiesa, Paolo
Contributor(s):
Title : Una donna in pericolo. Un miracolo (napoletano?) inedito di san Samonas di Edessa
Source: Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 97 - 110.
Year of Publication: 2008.

2. Record Number: 14630
Author(s): Elliott, Janis and Cordelia Warr
Contributor(s):
Title : Introduction [The authors briefly survey Angevin patronage, the nuns' practices, the pictorial program, and the architectural scheme of the church of Santa Maria Donna Regina in Naples. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 1 - 12.
Year of Publication: 2004.

3. Record Number: 14633
Author(s): Clear, Matthew J.
Contributor(s):
Title : Maria of Hungary as Queen, Patron, and Exemplar [The author considers Mary of Hungary's areas of influence including her role as regent ("vicar") during her husband's absences, her economic resources for political and religious activities, and her importance to her many family members as a support and a role model. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 45 - 60.
Year of Publication: 2004.

4. Record Number: 14634
Author(s): Michalsky, Tanja.
Contributor(s):
Title : Mater serenissimi principis: The Tomb of Maria of Hungary
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 61 - 77.
Year of Publication: 2004.

5. Record Number: 20787
Author(s): Fleck, Cathleen A
Contributor(s):
Title : Blessed the eyes that see those things you see: The Trecento Choir Frescoes at Santa Maria Donnaregina in Naples [Describes the events depicted in the fresco cycles of the monastery, and makes connections between the relationship of the nun's agency as viewer of the frescoes to her relationship with the male mendicant orders of the monastery. Also examines how the content of the frescoes alludes to increases in women's literacy in Naples during this period. Title note supplied by Femiane.].
Source: Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 67., ( 2004):  Pages 201 - 224.
Year of Publication: 2004.

6. Record Number: 14635
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline.
Contributor(s):
Title : The Architectural Context of Santa Maria Donna Regina [The author briefly surveys three aspects of the church's architecture: the organization of the spaces, the particular needs of Clarissan churches, and the development of the church's design in relation to other Neapolitan churches, especially the cathedral with the tomb of Charles I. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 79 - 92.
Year of Publication: 2004.

7. Record Number: 14636
Author(s): Yakou, Hisashi.
Contributor(s):
Title : Contemplating Angels and the "Madonna of the Apocalypse" [The author briefly discusses antecedents for the nuns' elevated choir and then turns to the church's frescoes. Yakou in particular focuses on the "Angelic Choirs" and the "Madonna of the Apocalypse" in terms both of iconography and meditative use by the Clarissan nuns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 93 - 107.
Year of Publication: 2004.

8. Record Number: 14639
Author(s): Warr, Cordelia.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Golden Legend" and the Cycle of the "Life of Saint Elizabeth of Thuringia-Hungary" [The author briefly traces various lives of Saint Elizabeth as sources for the cycle of paintings in Santa Maria Donna Regina. Warr also argues that as patron Mary of Hungary was involved in the project's plans especially for those paintings that honored her great-aunt Elizabeth and celebrated the sanctity of the Arpád and Anjou lines. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 155 - 174.
Year of Publication: 2004.

9. Record Number: 14638
Author(s): Hoch, Adrian S.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Passion Cycle": Images to Contemplate and Imitate amid Clarissan "clausura" [The author argues that the passion cycle in the church of Santa Maria Donna Regina emphasized an "imitatio Mariae," a devotion to the Eucharist, and Franciscan concerns for female viewers. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 129 - 153.
Year of Publication: 2004.

10. Record Number: 14632
Author(s):
Contributor(s):
Title : Religious Patronage and Royal Propaganda in Angevin Naples: Santa Maria Donna Regina in Context [The author explores the Angevin rulers' connections with Franciscanism, their religious patronage generally, and their efforts to strengthen and lend prestige to their dynasty. Kelly maintains that Angevin support of Franciscan Spirituals and religious p
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 27 - 43.
Year of Publication: 2004.

11. Record Number: 14631
Author(s): Genovese, Rosa Anna.
Contributor(s):
Title : Prologue: History of the Building and Restoration of the Trecento Church [The author briefly surveys Santa Maria Donna Regina's history from its fourteenth century building and alterations in the early modern era to restorations in the nineteenth and twentieth centuries. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 13 - 26.
Year of Publication: 2004.

12. Record Number: 14640
Author(s): Elliott, Janis.
Contributor(s):
Title : The "Last Judgement": The Cult of Sacral Kingship and Dynastic Hopes for the Afterlife [The author argues that Queen Mary of Hungary used her royal patronage to create an iconography that was personally meaningful to her as well as an embodiment of the dynastic concerns of the Angevin house. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 175 - 193.
Year of Publication: 2004.

13. Record Number: 14641
Author(s): Gardner, Julian.
Contributor(s):
Title : Santa Maria Donna Regina in its European Context [The author argues for Santa Maria Donna Regina's importance as a royal monastery for women. Other contemporary examples like Longchamps and Poissy do not survive. Furthermore, Mary of Hungary's tomb and the extensive fresco program incorporate complex dynastic and sacred themes. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 195 - 201.
Year of Publication: 2004.

14. Record Number: 14637
Author(s): Fleck, Cathleen A
Contributor(s):
Title : To exercise yourself in these things by continued contemplation: Visual and Textual Literacy in the Frescoes at Santa Maria Donna Regina [The author argues that the Donna Regina fresco program was planned to enhance the resident nuns' understanding and meditation on the tenets of the faith. Furthermore many of the nuns would have had a visual literacy as well as a textual literacy to understand the sophisticated iconography and the Latin inscriptions. The nuns also would need to summon up relevant Biblical texts and other readings from memory. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: The Church of Santa Maria Donna Regina: Art, Iconography, and Patronage in Fourteenth-Century Naples.   Edited by Janis Elliott and Cordelia Warr .   Ashgate, 2004. Schede Medievali , 46., ( 2008):  Pages 109 - 128.
Year of Publication: 2004.

15. Record Number: 7366
Author(s): Nuovo, Isabella
Contributor(s):
Title : La festa tra spettacolo e invenzione: il corte nuziale di Isabella d'Aragona e Gian Galeazzo Sforza [Magnificence was expected of Italian courts in the 15th century. This extended to wedding with their diplomatic overtones. In 1489 King Alfonso of Naples married his daughter Isabella to the young duke of Milan, Gin Galeazzo Sforza. Ceremonies in both Naples and Milan were marked by conspicuous display. Scholars and artists, including Leonardo da Vinci, were enlisted to ornament these nuptials.]
Source: Patrimonium in festa: cortei, tornei, artifici e feste alla fine del Medioevo (secoli XV-XVI).   Edited by Anna Modigliani .   Centro di Studi per il Patrimonio di S. Pietro in Tuscia; Ente Ottava Medievale di Orte, 2000. Zeitschrift für Kunstgeschichte , 67., ( 2004):  Pages 133 - 148.
Year of Publication: 2000.

16. Record Number: 14582
Author(s): Di Giorgi, Marianna
Contributor(s):
Title : Santa Maria Egiziaca tra Oriente e Occidente. La "Vita Sanctae Mariae Aegyptiacae Meretricis" di Paolo Diacono Napoletano [In the ninth century, Paul the Deacon translated a Greek life of Mary the Egyptian into Latin. Mary had an extensive cult in the East, and it had reached the West by the sixth century. Paul came from Naples, a center of Mary's cult and its texts. His translation was free enough to make his own theological points in a style that was unique. The article ends with a series of tables giving Paul's Latin renderings of Greek words and phrases. Title note supplied by Feminae.]
Source: Schede medievali , 38., ( 2000):  Pages 155 - 197.
Year of Publication: 2000.

17. Record Number: 5005
Author(s): Facchiano, Annamaria.
Contributor(s):
Title : Monachesimo femminile nel Mezzogiorno medievale e moderno [The monastic history of southern Italy is complex. Several orders were present, some of Greek background; and regions display differences between them. Lay patrons often reserved to themselves the right to name the abbess, and nuns even built themselves private houses within the enclosure. Reform of these houses might require importing a new abbess from elsewhere, as well as strict enforcement of monastic enclosure and proper care for the monastery's patrimony].
Source: Il monachesimo femminile in Italia dall' Alto Medioevo al secolo XVII a confronto con l' oggi.   Edited by Gabriella Zarri .   San Pietro in Cariano: Il Segno dei Gabrielli editori, 1997. Schede medievali , 38., ( 2000):  Pages 169 - 191.
Year of Publication: 1997.

18. Record Number: 9519
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline.
Contributor(s):
Title : Queen Sancia of Mallorca and the Convent Church of Sta. Chiara in Naples [The author argues that the convent church building significantly departs from previous models of architectural planning in the Poor Clare tradition. In part she attributes this to Queen Sancia's deep devotion to the original ideals of Francis which prompted her to found a double house and redesign the church layout so that the nuns could see the host while remaining unseen by the laity and the Friars. The queen also was reacting to ecclesiastical controversies in which her own relatives took leading roles as proponents of the Franciscan Spirituals against Pope John XXII. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Memoirs of the American Academy in Rome , 40., ( 1995):  Pages 69 - 100.
Year of Publication: 1995.

19. Record Number: 10295
Author(s): Bruzelius, Caroline A.
Contributor(s):
Title : Hearing is Believing: Clarissan Architecture, ca. 1213-1340 [The article studies convent churches in medieval Italy, in order to evaluate changes in the liturgical participation of Clarissan nuns. Title note supplied by Feminae.].
Source: Gesta 31, 2 (1992): 83-91. Link Info Later published in Medieval Religion: New Approaches. Edited by Constance Hoffman Berman. Routledge, 2005. Pages 272-289.
Year of Publication: 1992.